Tapping into an electric circuit

Page 2 of 3  


Maybe I'm missing your meaning of "lighting circuit".
Many workshops are wired with the lights on their own circuit. Keeps the place from going dark when a piece of power equipment pops the breaker. That's how I wired mine. I put in a dedicated circuit for the shop lights so nothing but a complete power failure will leave me stumbling around in a dark workshop.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 14 Jan 2013 00:14:02 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

As Clare pointed out, it's also common for kitchens and other rooms that have a lot of can lighting. It makes a lot of sense everywhere, but it's rarely done.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 14 Jan 2013 00:14:02 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

Preferred is to have 2 circuits in every room, and alternate lighting between circuits so if you pop one circuit you will still have light in at least every second room - and if lights are out you will still have outlet power so you can plug in a trouble light.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I first moved into my house, before I upgraded the panel, they had at least one thing right. The landing light on the first floor was on the circuit that handled most of the second floor and vice versa. Mistake or not, it did help out when fuses blew.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 14 Jan 2013 04:07:08 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 13 Jan 2013 21:24:47 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Kitchens often have separate lighting circuits. My AL house had separate lighting circuits, as well, mainly because each room had a ceiling fan (two in the great room).

That's what I'm doing in my basement (with separate lighting circuits). I want to be able to plug in two high current tools, anywhere.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/12/2013 12:24 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Well, that's just not so--soldering has been acceptable by NEC since the git-go w/ the provision as above mentioned of mechanically sound irrespective of the solder.

--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

familliar with. Soldered was allowed/required with H&T wiring - not allowed with non-metallic sheathed cable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

that powers a light switch. I want to run a new wire from the existing wire to the ceiling fan. How do I tap into the existing wire? Open the box where that switch is and see if there is only one cable coming in with the black and white (maybe with black tape on it) going to the switch, you can't use that one. You could get what you want from a ceiling box over a light most of the time but they are usually packed with wires. There may not be room for another. If you see a ceiling box with 2 or 3 cables, that may be a candidate but if it only has one, not so much, unless you only want the fan on when that light is on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/11/2013 12:48 PM, gary wrote:

that powers a light switch. I want to run a new wire from the existing wire to the ceiling fan. How do I tap into the existing wire? You need to read the electrical code in your jurisdiction, wherever that is. Tapping into a wire is trivial. Making it pass inspection may take more knowledge than you currently possess. And the thing that trips you up will seem trivial or even stupid.
A lot depends on your definition of "ceiling fan".
My neighbor came home with a ceiling fan...the bladed decapitation type. I read the instructions and suggested he take it back.
According to the instructions, you can't install the fan into an existing box in the ceiling. You need a box approved for ceiling fan use. Near as I could tell, the approved box differed in three areas. It had a sticker that said, "approved for ceiling fan use". And a price sticker with a substantially higher price. And it required opening the ceiling and patching it back up.
He wasn't gonna get a permit or have it inspected. I didn't want to be party to denial of a fire insurance claim.
This stuff is easy and you can always get away with it...until you get caught with your house on fire.
Funny story... About 50 years ago, there was some problem with the window air conditioner. It got unplugged. Dad had difficulty getting the plug back into the wall, but made it happen. Next day, I was riding my bike home from school. "Cool, look at all the fire trucks!" Imagine how my mood changed when I discovered it was MY house. Point being, simple stuff can cause BIG problems.
And that wasn't the last time I got burned out of my house. But that's a funny story for a different day.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How can plugging an an AC that got unplugged start a fire?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/11/2013 5:48 PM, mike wrote:

box and a fan support box than just a sticker, price, and necessity to open the ceiling

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ther IS. The ceiling fan box is designed to support the weight of the swinging ceiling fan and transfer the weight to the ceiling joists.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 01/11/2013 06:59 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

However, there's no need to open the ceiling, there are ceiling fan box/hanger kits that will go right in place of the old ceiling box, from below, with only a little difficulty.
Even if you end up making a bit of a mess of the install a rosette is cheap and easy, and the simpler ones don't look too bad. (had to use one at my last place due to a PO's butchery of a strip fluorescent install, it looked great after caulking and painting.)
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 18:59:40 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

A regular box is normally just held in place by a couple of roofing nails or sheetrock screws. If the box comes loose, the fan falls and might decapitate someone. That someone could be YOU!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sure there is. It has to be able to take the weight of the fan and the vibration without falling out of the ceiling. It only makes sense to make sure the thing can take a beating.
We hear the "insurance" nonsense here all the time but it's BS. The worrywarts couldn't take a piss without their master's permission.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 11, 7:02pm, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I was thinking the same thing. By now you'd think there would be case after case cited here by these folks where an insurance company denied a claim because someone did some work incorrectly themselves. It might be out there, but I have yet to see it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I once asked two independent insurance adjusters if insurers would deny such a claim. Neither one hesitated before saying "They'd pay."
I've been all over my homeowner's policy. The only clause that might allow them to deny such a claim would be if they could establish it was deliberate with the goal of burning the house down.
Please write down the date and time. This is an event unlikely to occur ever again. The three of us agreeing on something.
-- Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not to spoil the moment, but I can think of one potential line of argument to deny a claim. Typically homeowners insurance doesn't cover criminal acts that you commit. They could argue that the electrical circuit you added without a permit that was done incorrectly was a violation of the law. But I'm not sure it meets the level of a true criminal act. And they would have to prove that it was the cause of the loss, etc.
Claims may in fact have been denied for work that was done incorrectly by a homeowner, without a permit, etc., somewhere, sometime. But if it's happened, funny that the folks that keep bringing this up don't have cases to show us. If they do, I'd be happy to see them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I, for one, would not be happy to see them.
I'm quite happy believing that all of the upgrades I've done to my electrical system are not going to come back and bite me should I ever, God forbid, have to put in a fire related claim.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.