Taping drywall - Third coat of mud

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I have applied the second coat of mud over the tape and last night I did a little bit of sanding so smooth things out a bit before adding the last coat. Do I need to wash the dust from the sanding off of the joints before I add the last coat of mud? I am wondering if the dust might cause streak lines in the new coat of mud.
Also, a few of the seems look pretty good after the second coat. I must have gotten the mud a little thicker than I intended but it looks like they might not even need the third coat. Should I do the third coat on those seams anyway?
Thanks, David
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I'm not a fan of sanding, and prefer to pretty much eliminate sanding by not putting too much compound on the wall in the first place, paying attention to not leaving any nibs behind, and using a damp sponge to wet sand and smooth out as necessary. A little dust won't hurt things, but if you're going to worry about the dust, you should worry about the dust getting all over the house. You should vacuum up the stuff as you're sanding.

Can't tell from here. ;) Until you have the eye, and touch, for reading your spackling job, you might find that putting primer on the wall is the only way you'll know if you need to pay more attention on the next project. Sometimes I get the job 'good enough' and then prime paint to see where I have to do touch ups. I find it easier in most cases as there are always touch ups and the uniform prime coat makes it much easier to locate the deficiencies.
R
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wrote:

I'm not a fan of sanding, and prefer to pretty much eliminate sanding by not putting too much compound on the wall in the first place, paying attention to not leaving any nibs behind, and using a damp sponge to wet sand and smooth out as necessary. A little dust won't hurt things, but if you're going to worry about the dust, you should worry about the dust getting all over the house. You should vacuum up the stuff as you're sanding.

Can't tell from here. ;) Until you have the eye, and touch, for reading your spackling job, you might find that putting primer on the wall is the only way you'll know if you need to pay more attention on the next project. Sometimes I get the job 'good enough' and then prime paint to see where I have to do touch ups. I find it easier in most cases as there are always touch ups and the uniform prime coat makes it much easier to locate the deficiencies.
R
Third coat is just a skim coat...Do it..It will fill in things you might not see and is easier then running around with your nose on the wall looking for touchups.......Sand it and vacume up the mess...Tape plastic over the door if you're worried about dust getting into the rest of the house...
R...I thought you was a pro...Your *spackling* routine sounds like something a bewildered homeowner might do...LOL...Get it good enough , prime it THEN do the touch-ups...Sand it and prime again...ROFLMAO...I would be outa business in a NY minute if I went that route....I can't imagine doing 250 sheets that way...You crack me up....LOL....I take it you only do little jobs....
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I'm getting older, and I do it all by myself. I no longer do jobs that are more than 20 or 30 sheets - I'll sub it out...and budget time for fixing the newly completed job done by the speed pros. I get paid for quality and reasonable speed, not speed and reasonable quality.
The term spackling, like strapping, is a regional thing. Taping occurs in only one coat of the 'taping', so it's a misnomer. In other parts of the country, and with other colloquial jargon, it may be referred to as floating, mudding, etc. It's still the same thing, eh?
I primarily work on occupied spaces, so occupant comfort is paramount. I don't create excess noise or dust. People appreciate it. That's another thing I get paid for - consideration.
R
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RicodJour wrote the following:

Good for you! But then, you can always do it the 'Made in China' way and make more money with less work.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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I don't know if I could stand the commute. ;)
R
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wrote:

I'm getting older, and I do it all by myself. I no longer do jobs that are more than 20 or 30 sheets - I'll sub it out...and budget time for fixing the newly completed job done by the speed pros. I get paid for quality and reasonable speed, not speed and reasonable quality.
The term spackling, like strapping, is a regional thing. Taping occurs in only one coat of the 'taping', so it's a misnomer. In other parts of the country, and with other colloquial jargon, it may be referred to as floating, mudding, etc. It's still the same thing, eh?
I primarily work on occupied spaces, so occupant comfort is paramount. I don't create excess noise or dust. People appreciate it. That's another thing I get paid for - consideration.
R
Just yanking your chain Ric...LOL...Though you did brag that you were a concrete to keys contractor that ONLY subed out the electric and HVAC..Eh??? And if you need to fix your so called Pro's work , perhaps you should find a different one that gets it right the first time or atleast comes back to fix it...It's also nice if they speak English , pay taxes and don't list their residence as the parking lot at Homedepot as well....Spackling is how girls say it ...LOL....
If I'm in a house with folks present I too try to be considerate if possible...However if I'm in a new house or one with the homeowners gone I CRANK my Milwaukee jobsite radio and let the mud fly...Though it is sometimes embarassing to be working along , singing away and turn around to see guys laughing at my singing...LOL....
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Only after you get a coat of primer or paint on the wall will you know for sure how good your leveling technique is.
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wrote:

Only after you get a coat of primer or paint on the wall will you know for sure how good your leveling technique is.
Huh ??? We were talking about Pro's not a first timer...I doubt I would be getting much drywall work or be in business for 20 years if I had to constantly run back to jobs after the painters had primed and tell the painters to go home for a few days so I could check my " leveling technique" and do more mudding and sanding..Then tell them to prime it again..Then do I go back and check again ?? .ROFLMAO....Homeowners maybe but not a pro..A good PRO will know what will cover and what won't before any paint hits the wall and the only touch-ups the painter should have is just be whatever dings are on the walls that the other subs do by mistake....
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The OP certainly was not a PRO.
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wrote:

The OP certainly was not a PRO.
True , but as in all threads it has kinda wondered off topic...I was having a conversation with .RicodJour...You might have seen that if you had read the previous posts...HTH...
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On Mon, 11 Jan 2010 10:06:06 -0800 (PST), RicodJour
...

Very good advice. BTW after 20 or 30 years of not doing it, you loose a lot of the feel that you might have had.
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Don't worry about the dust. Put the 3rd coat on, I always do. Comes out better.
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Thanks everbody. I started the third coat today and things are going well. This is my third such project over the last 10 years. I was more careful when I installed the drywall this time and have fewer and shorter butt joints.
I have 4 angles in the ceiling that are more like 130 degrees instead of the usual 90 degrees. I'm trying my hand at making those angles rounded instead of a sharp inside corner. I made the mistake of doing this without any research but I didn't know it was going to go this way until I started applying mud. It really wouldn't be too bad except I wind up with a bunch of little ridges at the edge of the knife.
David
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hibb wrote: (snip)

http://www.all-wall.com/acatalog/Rubber_Corner_Tool__Bat_Knife__.php
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Yep that's what you use...Corner pro is another name brand...same tool...I know it's to late now but if you use Ultraflex 450 or 325 prefinished corner tape making those corners are a breeze...Even for DIYers
http://www.all-wall.com/acatalog/copy_of_UltraFlex_325_100__Roll.html
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Great, I'm gonna look that stuff up. (shoulda done it before) I still have two more rooms to do that have those type of ceilings. Plus I can probably use that tool for the finish coat of the room I'm doing now.
David
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hibb wrote:

Once when doing an attic room with funny angles I made my own tool for those corners. Worked good too.
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wrote:

Always a good idea to dust off the surface after sanding. You can use a dry or very lightly damp rag. Hopefully you should not have to do too much sanding, it turns the job into a messy one. You are at an important step--inspect your work carefully with a work light against the wall and check for defects. Believe me, you'll find LOTS. Thin out the last mud coat.
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You don't have to worry about the dust on the wall till you paint and do not put a light against the wall...You will drive yourself crazy trying to get it perfect unless you skimcoat the entire wall...Drywall isn't finish carpentry and will never be perfect nor is it expected to be so......Use natural light or a light in the middle of the room...As long as it looks good in the natural light or whatever lights you're gonna have in there you'll be good....
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