Tape to repair office chair arm

I have a very old Herman Miller Aeron chair. The right arm rest has cracked and the cover is tearing. I've tried 2-3 kinds of tape to repair it, but none work well.
A couple of types of glass tape work well while they last, but the constant stretching eventually causes them to start to separate.
Electrical tape doesn't have the splitting problem, probably because it's stretchy itself. But it doesn't stay in place.
The arm rest is removable so I can wrap the tape completely around the top to the underneath part where it is held in place with a couple of heavy screws.
Any suggestions for a different kind if tape? I would prefer black as that's the color of the arm rest.
Thanks, guys ;-)
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Yes, with the addition of a pair of black stiletto heels.
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Cynthia Moore wrote:

Maybe an auto upholstery shop would be an answer. There's a site here that might help: https://www.ifixit.com/ There is an electrical tape for watertight connections that is really flexible. It's so sticky that it comes with plastic wound in with it to help it separate for application. It isn't all that tough though.
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On 5/9/15 5:21 PM, Cynthia Moore wrote:

Gear Aid Tenacious Tape for Fabric Repair may do the trick. Each package has 3" x 20".
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I wouldn't tape it at all. Get Naugahyde or cloth to match the armrest and install it with good spray adhesive.
On 5/9/2015 4:21 PM, Cynthia Moore wrote:

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Beter yet, staple it from the back of the armrest.

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There's a lot to be said for this. Especially if there is an unseen side of the armrest where the edges of the current covering come together.
They sell vinyl that looks something like leather at fabric stores. And lots of other fabrics. If you do both arms, it won't seem so bad if the match to the old stuff is not perfect. (Do they sell actual Naugahyde somewhere?)
Probbaby better than tape.
But as to tape, I'll tell you what I know. Gorilla tape is very sticky, and has a black back, but probably doesn't mold itself around corners.
And silicon tape, which is the size of electric tape but wrapped on a white plastic piece of tube (instead of a paper roll) is expensive (though I think I found a nameless cheap version at Home Depot once) and molds itself excellenty (and after a day or two merges into one piece) but it's surface won't be that pleasant. Not shiny or smooth, not sticky either

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wrote:

But probably don't take off the current covering. There might be a bunch of foam rubber underneath, about to crumble and fall off.
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On 05/09/2015 07:50 PM, micky wrote:

No, the Nauga was declared an endangered species by the World Wildlife Federation in 2003.
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On 5/9/2015 10:55 PM, rbowman wrote:

As such, they are now over populated, and eating the Styro out of its natural habitat. Price of Styrofoam is going to go up, soon. Africans have been poaching Nauga, to little effect.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 5/9/2015 5:21 PM, Cynthia Moore wrote:

UV resistant lineset tape. From your HVAC wholesale house.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Sat, 09 May 2015 14:21:57 -0700, Cynthia Moore

If the armrest comes off why use tape? get a nice chunk of jersey-backed vinyl of the right colour and re-wrap the armrest. Why do a half-assed repair when a real repair is every bit as easy and no more expensive than fooling around with what you KNOW won't do the job???
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On 05/09/2015 03:21 PM, Cynthia Moore wrote:

Gorilla Tape comes in black.
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Cynthia Moore wrote:

Black duct tape.
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On Sat, 09 May 2015 14:21:57 -0700, Cynthia Moore

I took the arms off my chair and put clear silicone sealant into all the cracked areas and just glued the whole thing back together. It's mostly held up for about a year. The most leaned on one has cracked again and I'm going to have to redo it. I would have preferred to use a Urethane but couldn't find any at the time. In my experience Urethane is stickier and more durable then silicone plus now that I've used silicone it may be hard to get a new application of anything to stick to it. You can buy replacement arm pads from Amazon but you would need to verify that they would fit. I found some that would fit (right spacing for screw holes, etc, but they were smaller overall so I decided to try gluing mine instead.
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On Saturday, May 9, 2015 at 4:21:25 PM UTC-5, Cynthia Moore wrote:

That's a quality chair so why not buy new arm pads? A quick search found a pair for $40.00. Some used ones on eBay.
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