Tape for leak under sink

I have a very, very slow leak in the trap under bathroom sink. (I think it got that way after I used a strong drain opener!) I put a jar underneath to catch the drip but it's so ugly!
Is there a plumber's tape that will seal the leak semi-permanently -- or at least till I can afford a plumber?
Tx
Aspasia
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Replace the trap. It is relatively simple.
Is the trap under the sink metal or white plastic? ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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I know it is -- in theory. I'm just not up to crawling under there with a wrench. Very narrow space. I had sink set into an old sewing machine cabinet long ago - looks kewl but not easy to access. Call me chicken...<g>

Metal.
Any word on temporary fix w/tape?
Aspasia

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<aspasia> wrote in message

No tape is going to properly fix it long term. Most any tape can buy you a few weeks, like duct or electrical tape. You can buy a new trap for about $10 and replace it yourself for just a few dollars. It is one of the easier plumbing jobs you can do. It will leak again if it is corroded.
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I have never had any luck getting tape, rags, etc stopping the water. There is a spray available that supposedly seals leaks from the outside. I have no experience, but have seen several responses that it seems to work. I think the stuff is available at the big box stores. Duct tape and other wide tapes do not form to the round curving surfaces well. Electrician's tape does well with the curves. It will certainly slow the leak, but it will not cure it for anything more than a very temporary time. The taped up trap would look more ugly to me than the bowl catching the drips. The ugly bowl catching the drips is certainly better than water staining and warping the cabinet bottom.
If you decide to take it on, the big issue is how the trap finally goes into the wall. If it going into a threaded ring at the wall, it will be fairly simple. If it is soldered directly into a pipe at the wall, it may be beyond DIY capabilities.
Can you tell if the bottom of the trap is eaten out or if the leak is coming from one of the threaded fittings? Assuming the bottom of the trap is damaged, you should be able to replace just the trap. It would require using something like a channel lock pliers (pump pliers) or small pipe wrench to loosen the existing threaded rings and to reinstall them on the new trap.
If I were doing it, I would change out the existing metal to PVC. I am old enough to remember hating all things plastic, but plastic plumbing was one of the first things to change my mind about plastic. A whole trap assembly costs under $10. and the plastic can deal with almost any chemical you dump down the drain (you buy acid in plastic bottles). The trap set tightens by hand needing no tools. You may still need the tools to get the old metal one loose.
______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net
<aspasia> wrote in message

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On Sun, 19 Mar 2006 18:14:27 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net wrote:

Then get a prettier jar.

No tape, but PC-70 will probably work. Did for me, stopped the leak while it was dripping. I used a big blob, maybe that went all around the pipe, at least a narrow band did. I did try to dry it first -- the best way -- but the dripping faucet made the stuff I put on it droop away from the drain. I had to push the stuff back on a few times until it started to harden and didn't droop down again. I guess I could have just held my finger there, but I think it was awkward, like with you.
If I had it to do over, I'd put a really big pot in the sink so that the dripping stopped while I was gluing it, and it was setting.
PC-70 has a million uses. I was missing the cap for my wine sack, so I put vaseline on the threads, and made a new cap out of PC-70. A minute later, I put a hole through it for a string so I wouldn't lose the new cap. Once it hardened fully, overnight, even with the vaseline it stuck on so I had to use pliers to unscrew it.

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snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net wrote:

need for a standard repair kit for drains that includes about 3 pieces of white plastic pipe and the required connection fittings.
If you are using a strong drain opener you must have a draining problem and you probably moved the drain pipes around a bit while you were working on them. If you tried to tighten the connections a bit and the leak didn't stop, you probably have a damaged seal and all you need is to replace one of the seals. Or, if you have metal pipe, you may have pin holes in the pipe that allow water to seep out. In the latter case buy a replacement kit, get out your slip joint pliers and replace the parts.
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If you want a temporary fix, go to the plumbing section of HD, or the local hdw store. They have epoxy based products made for this purpose. Depending on where it's leaking, it may work.
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Try this stuff.....amazing!!! It has bailed me out many times. http://www.tommytape.com/types.htm It has even stopped leaks that are under pressure.

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I would replace with plastic. Something you could try. Go to an automobile parts store and get a can of stuff to seal a leaking radiator. Mix some of it with boiling water in a container you will never use for cooking and slowly pour down the drain, repeat if necessary It may work.
I didn't used to believe in this stuff until my car overheated on a trip. A rock had nicked the radiator making a small leak. The guy at the gas station said might as well try this stuff, and it worked. Sold the car after putting another 50k miles on it with the same radiator.

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i tried that radiator stop leak once, it fixed the leak but cloogged my radiator and heater core.
700 bucks later vehicle was running ok again
I once used electric tape on a rusty trap, about that time my grandma died, and I must of forgot about it.
9 years later I was surprised to find the tape, then rembered the insanity of the funeral and leaky trap, so I could date the repair. I must of used a entire roll of tape, and investigated.
All that was left of the trap was the tape, the metal was completely gone
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On Sun, 19 Mar 2006 18:14:27 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net wrote:

the solutions are really kewl).
I think when I get back (going on long trip) I will gird up my loins and replace the damn trap. 'Preciate the hint about plastic rather than metal. I hope they will mate OK.
Hasta la vista!
Aspasia
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