Tankless electric water heater question

When you install an electric tankless water heater, do you have the electrician hook up the wiring first or do you have the plumber hook up the supply lines first?
I am thinking the electrical should be hooked up first but not sure.
Thanks,
MC
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Mine is gas and everything done by gas company at same time but if I had a small electric one I would have electician do his job first since it should be a no brainer as long as you give him specs for the heater.

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If possible, you install the most "disruptive" systems first and then work the other stuff around.
For example, duct work and waste lines go in first. Then other plumbing "works around" the ducts and pipes. It's "nice" for fixed appliances including HVAC and water heaters to be connected to duct work and plumbing. At this point, the wiring can be neatly connected to the appliance. It's easy to run wires around pipes and ducts but the reverse ain't so each. I
If you have good plans the electrician can wire leaving coils of wire hanging where he things it should be able to reach wherever the appliance needs the juice. With the price of copper today, this might not be such a great idea.
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We just had one of these installed. The electrician came out and put in the wiring first, then the plumber did the pipes, then the electrician returned after it was plumbed and turned it on.
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Let the plumber do his job first. The electrician has more flexibility in locating the wiring. You could have the electrician prewire the unit with a plug and cord or if it is a really big unit have it prewired with flex. It could make wiring easier later if the unit is located in a confined space.
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First you hang the tank, then whoever shows up first
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From a logical standpoint, working with plumbing is more restrictive than wiring, even using PEX. The nature of piping is that it is always a compromise with the space available, the fittings that can be obtained, and access to the input source. Wiring, OTOH, can be run over, under, around and through obstacles. Some say this is why so many plumbers have ornery dispositions, a truism I can't verify.
Jpe
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It's usually easier to route electrical lines than plumbing lines, so my preferred order is plumbing first. If both are easily routed/ accessible, it doesn't matter as much.
R
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MiamiCuse wrote:

Do it all yourself and save money. (You may need to have your electrical service upgraded first). You need at least a 200 amp service. Better to go with gas or propane.
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STOP!whole house electric tankless tend to not work well, likely need 200 amps for just heating water if you live in northern area where it gets cold.
cold winter water temperatures a ery likely disappointment.
electric tankless just doesnt have enough BTUs.
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wrote:

STOP!whole house electric tankless tend to not work well, likely need 200 amps for just heating water if you live in northern area where it gets cold.
cold winter water temperatures a ery likely disappointment.
electric tankless just doesnt have enough BTUs.
In my case it is ok. I am using it only to heat the kitchen dishwasher and laundry washer in the east wing of the house, the west wing is heater by another independent tank heater. I am in Miami so the rise I need is not as high as the northern states. Electric service is ok, it will need 3 independent double pole breakers 240V 3x39 amps. I am getting the Eemax series 3, with a 5gpm demand I will get 40 degree rise out of 29kw.
Thanks,
MC
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