Tank less water heater

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Thanks to all of you who responded. You answered my question fully. Methinks I'll do without one of those tankless thingies, too much of a headache, really. Thanks again :)
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I researched them up and down.
Facts: They save energy by heating water just before it comes out of the tap.
Fact: For the 115 volt variety, electricity is usually close by. Good for a wash sink, or even a kitchen sink. Probably a dishwasher, maybe.
Fact: For the 220V. variety, they take a single dedicated circuit and breaker per unit, 50-70 amps, IIRC. No problem if you're wiring the house during construction, but for a retrofit, it might be spendy.
Fact: You need to alter your style a little so that you don't put too much demand on it at any one time. Running all showers at once, plus the dishwasher, plus the washing machine may require more than they can put out, so you have to be aware, and break up your usage.
Fact: If you have a large house with a few 220v. units, you may have to have a very large service. No problem, but something to be put in from square one, and more costly at first.
Fact: Over the life of the product, they will save money.
If it weren't for the costly retrofit, I'd do it in a heartbeat. If I do any new construction, it will definitely be in there.
My two cents. YMMV.
Steve
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Learn how to ask a proper question.
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Maybe you could learn how to provide a proper answer, or maybe read the question.
Sure it would have been better if the OP had provided more details about his use of them, but when first thinking about them, most people would not have enough knowledge of them to know what to ask. So it becomes a two way conversation where we may provide some information and ask some questions so more information may be provided more specific to the OP's situation. That is the way a newsgroup works, just like a conversation, but with a delay.
Your response did not provide any information on the subject nor did it provide any information to help the OP know what information he should provide.
We all can lean.
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Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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On Mon, 31 Mar 2008 09:04:06 -0400, "Joseph Meehan"
I do.
A local fire dept. Captain built a 6000 + sq ft house - single story. 4BR, 4 Bath. The house is zoned; having two tank less water heaters. A four member family. Parents on one end of the house and kids at the other.
Each zone has hot water when the unit calls for it. The units are outside, plumbed, framed in the wall and has easy access. They vent outside.(?).
I didn't get to read the manual, but I suspect this was a very good unit. They have been in the house for one year now (desert SW). When I seen the fireman again, I've got to ask about his experience.
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it will likely be good helped by warm incoming water, since heaters are outside, cant be a area with freezing temperatures.........
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On Mon, 31 Mar 2008 14:53:27 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

It freezes in the desert here. How does this relate to the tank less water heater and the performance?
Exterior tank less heaters.... gas piped... PEX pipe to all the hot water features.
I'm not afraid to consider a tank less heater, and I see the worthiness of having them.
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chilly nite likely replaced by warm day, gound temperature probably doesnt get to below 40 degrees, hot water heaters must accept low incoming temperature water.....
way easier when water comes in at 50 leaves at 120..........
40 degree incoming water is togher for all heaters to cope with. much hared for tankless
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

They have a thermostat that turns on the burners for a few seconds if the temperature is cold enough to freeze water. It continually monitors for this and protects the lines and the nheater from ever freezing. Haven't looked at any in a while, huh?
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Oren wrote:

In the South West desert every heater will do :)
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netnanny
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I have one in my home, but I would not recommend them.
While for one person that never wants to shower at the same time he does his laundry it might be fine, multiple hot water users screw things up.
You need to install an oversize gas line and an upgraded vent to feed the very large burner needed to supply enough BTU's to give you on demand heating.
The unit needs service from time to time and the parts are bloody expensive. I moved into my place with a dead electric water heater so I did not have a good comparison to a standard tank model, but in comparing gas bills to similar homes with regular tank water heaters they do not seem to burn a heck of a lot more gas than I do.
If you had a cabin where you only went occasionally then these might make sense, but for regular domestic use I would give a pass.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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On Sun, 30 Mar 2008 19:55:11 -0700, "Roger Shoaf"

Good advice! A lot of people today think that the regular storage tank heaters waste tremendous amounts of energy.
In truth, they do not, especially if they are instulated well. An average-grade insulated tank heater can be full of hot water and will normally not even feel warm when touching the outside of the tank. Of course, the outflow pipes should be insulated for best results, but this is not expensive to do during the initial plumbing installation. Electric models can be placed on a timer or even shut off by a switch if the house is vacant for a long time.
The capacity to store hot water means that your burner or electric heating element does not have to be excessively large, expensive, or difficult to replace, and make excessive instantaneous demands on your gas or electrcal system.
Also, in the larger urban areas, the tank-type heaters are almost commodity items and can usually be replaced quickly and cheaply with standard stock replacements.
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I have one and am getting a 4 yr payback on a 500$ Bosch plus instalation. You have to size everything right, the gas supply and flow are where the mistake are made all to often. You dont say what you want to know or its use that you need, but you will find alot of bad advise here from people that are ill informed.
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