Taking apart a large transformer

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I am demolishing a huge 8 kVa UPS. Lots of nice wires, screws etc.
It has a large transformer, it weighs around 200 lbs. It comes from a that 8 KVA Ferrups UPS. There is a super heavy square shaped copper wire on it, which, I fancy, could sell for some money. This wire is something like 3x8 mm in cross section. Very heavy stuff. So, if I somehow manage to pull the transformer apart, I would, first, able to throw the steel part to garbage, and second, to get and sell copper wire. i would also keep some of this copper wire for home uses such as grounding wire for my generator.
Without taking it apart I will not be able to do anything with this monstrosity, not even throw it away.
This is a specialty transformer with lots of contacts, so I do not think that I could sell it. (another, smaller like 50 lbs transformer is an isolation transformer which I hope to sell for at least something. Also, there are 8 1.2 farad capacitors)
So... How do I take it apart? It was assembled from steel plates, can it be therefore disassembled?
i
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Here in upstate NY, an entire lake was contaminated with PCBs by some guy "salvaging" transformers at the shoreline. The fish are no longer safe to eat. You may want to investigate further what may be inside that transformer of yours before disassembling it. Perhaps your state's environmental conservation department, or local department of solid waste could assist in finding out more. Or, the manufacturer.
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Thanks.
Hm, all that is inside this transformer is steel, copper, varnish, and paper. Maybe you are referring to hyooge transformers filled with liquids? In any case, I will appreciate input regarding this issue, as I do not want to run afoul of the laws.
i
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Ignoramus22732 wrote:

if you can ID it you should be able to get the specs from the manufacturer to determine if it is oil filled or dry (maybe you already know). If it is dry then no problem. If oil filled and has PCB, make UPS take it back since they shouldn't have given or sold it to you.
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"Doug Kanter" wrote:>

How many transformers do you have in your house, Doug? How many of those contain PCBs? What types of transformers used PCBs, and what was the purpose for the PCBs?
Jon
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On 1/3/2005 1:37 PM US(ET), Jon Danniken took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

--
Bill

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Jesus guyz. The friggin' thing is a "dry-type" transformer! There are no (read my lips) ***NO*** PCBs in a dry type transformer.
The copper isn't worth more than 5 cents per pound. It is classed a mixed copper and nobody wants it.
The laminations are usually and E and an I type on each layer reversed positioned for each layer.

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Erm. ALL electrical, and plumbing (aside from the soldered joints) copper for that matter, is better than 99% pure copper.
Hell Bob, if you have some, I'll gladly pay you $0.05/lb, and shipping too!
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
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Insulated square copper wires from a dry transformer are not 99% copper and take a lot of work to remove the insulation.
I have tonnes of insulated copper wire if you want it. I think you could almost have for the picking it up. How many bins can you take per year?

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Simply add Tin and you have a Bronze of some sort. Copper is worth it to me. I have a fist with of backplane buss line copper that is 1/8 to 1/4" thick. So after I move, I'll buy some TIN from a Solder company or sorts and make Bronze.
Martin
Gymy Bob wrote:

--
Martin Eastburn, Barbara Eastburn
@ home at Lion's Lair with our computer snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net
  Click to see the full signature.
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5% each zinc, tin and lead makes the classic semired brass/bronze. Up to 22% tin (alone) makes a hard bell bronze. Up to 30% Pb (alone or with others) will make a frothy bearing bronze. Up to 35% zinc makes brass, much more and you get white (beta) brass, aka muntz I think.

By which you mean liberal application of less than a dollar of propane? I'm all for that...

Is that thin stuff or house wiring? Insulated or enameled? How much is shipping say 50lbs to 53511?
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
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50 lbs? We have it by the bin full. Mostly #6 to 650 MCM. I beleive you would have to leave a bin and then pick it up full later to compete with the current scrapper.

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I am curious... what state do you live in? a New England one I hope !!

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Nope...further south and it aint no state.

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Question 1: Doesn't matter. I have no intention of disassembling them.
Question 2: Probably none, but none of the transformers in my home are older than 3-4 years, except the tiny one that handles the doorbell. I doubt PCB's are permitted in small household transformers at this stage, considering what we know about them.
Question 3: The oil in older, larger transformers was there for either cooling or insulation - I don't recall, and it doesn't matter, since it's just a point of interest. But, the PCBs were there as a byproduct, not because they had a purpose.
What's YOUR point? That, knowing what we do about these chemicals, we should be stupid, pretend the knowledge doesn't exist, and be careless?
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"Doug Kanter" wrote:

My point is that I suspected you of being a reactionary man who is unable to consider a topic rationally, based upon the facts in evidence, without launching into a pre-programmed tirade based upon emotional supposition and lack of knowledge.
That you are unwilling to answer the very basic questions that I asked you WRT transformers further demonstrates this, and I thank you for further revealing yourself with your response.
I can't "fix" the problems that you seem determined to expose to the world, Doug,, but perhaps you would be a bit better off it you would at least educate yourself a bit before exposing your ignorance in any particular area of knowledge.
Of course, you might very well enjoy espousing your ignorance to the world; it seems to be a popular pastime with your type.
Jon
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Reactionary? Nonsense. The OP stated that he has a transformer weighing around 200 lbs. While this does not necessarily mean it's different from the one in my furnace, dishwasher or doorbell, it also does not mean it's the same. Neither you nor I know exactly what he has. You know that.
As far as "rational", I'm sure you're aware that there's an entire generation that has no idea what sort of chemistry experiments went on in this country before people finally woke up. Perhaps the Love Canal situation was the wakeup call. It's entirely possible that the OP had NO idea about what he might have in his possession.
Why do you have a problem with suggesting that he proceed with caution? Do you believe that all the research into the dangers of PCBs are junk science?
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There is no liquid in a "dry-type" transforemt and therefore no PCBs
PCB were only used in large transformers full of cooling oil for usage indoors because of the flammablity rating of the PCB oils.
Did you know, **NO***, I repeat ***NO*** death has ever been related to PCBs?

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No deaths? OK. But, why is it considered dangerous?

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Gymy Bob wrote:

From http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/epic/internet/inimr-ri.nsf/en/gr-71897e.html
"Unfortunately, Japan's PCB history is tinged with tragedy. In 1968, an accidental mixing of PCB with rice oil affected 14,000 people and resulted in 300 deaths."
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