T1-11 vs fiber cement lap siding

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I am having some siding replaced on my 20 y/o before painting. One of the contractors included in their bid replacing the current plywood T1-11 with fiber cement lap siding. Any comments on the pluses and minuses of the two options?
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wrote:

My 58 y/o could use some siding too, but she wants a face-lift.
My 14 y/o insists on using make-up.

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Okay, Okay, so it's been a tough day and I need a proofreader (g). Anybody have anything to say about what I should do with my 20 y/o HOUSE.
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wrote:

I make loads of typos and other mistakes. Gives people the chance to make jokes. :)
I would have tried to answr your question but I've never even heard of the stuff.
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What you are talking about is hardy plank. I live on the Oregon coast & it is used here a lot,it with stand the weather much better than wood & does not need painting as often.
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Fiber cement comes in panels as well as lap siding. It takes a special blade or shears to cut and a mask should be worn.
T
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Almost the "standard" these days on new home construction.
http://www.jameshardie.com /
Kurt Ullman wrote:

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Thanks for the information.
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. Sounded good to us until we asked a neighbour. Some problems here; damp climate. Neighbour's 8 inch Hardy plank lap siding delaminated in places. However while there is/was a possibility that my neighbours batch was improperly stored (out in the open?) before he bought and installed it, the manufacturer's rep. gave him a refund and allowance for labour for him to replace it on both ends of his A frame summer cabin. Wooden 8 inch pine on the other sides of his cabin is OK.
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terry wrote:

I've installed a ton of HardiePlank for Habitat for Humanity. Some issues: * Store it out of the rain. It's concrete, so it *will* absorb a little water. * It needs to be sealed on all sides. The Hardie brand comes primed, but you need to seal the cut ends with caulk. We have younger volunteers paint it all ahead of time. It's a good project for those too young (according to the insurance wonks) to use tools. Once it's painted, you can store it outside. * If you nail too close to the corner, it can split into layers. This doesn't appear to be a problem, since that area will be covered by the next layer. Avoid this by drilling pilot holes with a small masonry bit.
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Steve Bell
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Thanks. But I am definitely not gonna install it myself (although I now know what to look for when they ARE installing it). What I want to know is how is it better than T1-11 to justify the extra $14,000 (nearly double) that it would cost. Do I have to paint it less? Any energy savings due to better insulating (or energy costs). Why is it (or not) worth the extra money?
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

Ahhh, now I understand. All you have to do is hit me with a stick. :-)
* Since fiber-cement products (FCPs) are made of concrete and fiberglass, it won't rot and bugs won't eat it. T1-11 is wood, and usually cheap wood.
* FCPs are completely waterproof. T1-11 is also waterproof if installed properly, but if the coating fails, there goes the waterproofing.
* FCPs come primed and take paint well. T1-11 is bare wood, and you have to prep and maintain it.
* The appearance is completely uniform. T1-11 has voids that show in the grooves. You have to fill these before painting.
The major advantages, to me, are the rot resistance and uniformity.
Part of the price difference might be in labor. 4x8 panels go up faster than lap siding. You can also buy FCPs in 4x8 panels, giving a similar look to T1-11.
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Thanks. Do you have to paint as often or is most of the savings in maintenance not having to replace them every once in a while?
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That's hard to say, but generally it does hold a paint job a good bit longer than wood siding.
It depends on: (a) Where you live (b) Quality of the paint put on (c) How the paint was put on
Kurt Ullman wrote:

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Personally I am not seeing a whole lot of reason to spend that much extra money. Am I missing something?
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"Kurt Ullman" wrote

Possibly just one and this is area dependant. T1-11 can be attractive to termites. In my area (Norfolk VA) this is a serious problem so the added expense of the cement lap siding, if not going vinyl, is worth it in the long run.
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wrote:

Had the t111 here. I put vinyl over it after watching it delaminate.
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Note that Hardie plank should not be installed within 6" of any horizontal surface, i.e. ground, steps, deck, etc. since it is prone to moisture wicking.
KC
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Are there any good siding alternatives (in plank form) that can be used within 6" of a horizontal surface?
Thanks
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blueman wrote:

The HardiePlank installation instructions say to maintain 1" - 2" clearance around paths, steps, and driveways; and to maintain 6" (or local code) above finished grade.
See figures 3 and 4 here: http://www.hardie.com/pdf/install/install_plank_south.pdf I don't know where you're located, so I chose the "south" instructions.
Around here, *all* siding products must be at least 6" off the dirt to discourage insects, especially termites.
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