T1-11 Siding Question ?

Hello:
Saw a house we might be interested in purchasing, and was told that it has T1-11 siding. These are vertical board siding, and understand that it is a "type" of plywood siding. True ?
Anyway, it looks as if several are damaged due to water seepage at the board ends, and will need replacement.
Is T1-11 still made and available ? By who ?
Are there different types and grades ?
Might someone please tell me something more about this type of siding ? Good, pros and cons, etc. ?
Much thanks, Bob
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Do a google search for T1-11 Siding. Here's one answer:
http://www.acutabovesiding.com/faq.htm#1 http://www.acutabovesiding.com/siding-issues.htm#alert
Sounds like crap that you don't want to get involved with.
--
"De inimico non loquaris sed cogites."

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My garage was built in 1978 and is sided with T1-11. It has been painted a few times but still looks as good as new. I'm going to add a shed on the back and use it there because it hold up so well with minimal care. Improperly installed and not maintained, ANY wood or composite siding can go bad. In the case of the OP, it can be removed and replaced.
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T1-11 is basically exterior grade plywood. If you can keep the water out of it you should be fine forever. Keep a good coat of paint on the surface and be sure the seams are sealed so water can't wick up into the edges. Don't get it down to grade and use "Z" flashing on horizontal seams
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T1-11 siding has been around for years and years. It is just a piece of exterior plywood dressed up to look good. It is used a lot in spec houses because it very cost effective. It is cheap to buy and cheap to install. The material itself is very durable. It is nothing more than exterior plywood. You should be able to find something to closely match it at any good lumber yard.

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wrote:

It *is* plywood siding.

Yes.
Now by several manufacturers, but your local lumber supplier will have it.

Different styles, and now there's pressure treated as well.

It's plywood. With all the pros and cons of plywood. Keep in painted and sealed, and keep it away from termites. It also makes an okay base for installing concrete lap siding or vinyl siding if you prefer that look. Even a base for stucco.
Jeff
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Good point. I have sided (with both vinyl and cedar beveled) over T-111 sided homes. It is a great base for siding. Just cover with tyvex and go at it.
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Just a few points I didn't notice from others.
    T-111 stands for Texture 111 which is what it was called when it was first made.
    It is 5/8" exterior grade plywood which is commonly made out of southern yellow pine (less expensive) or Douglas fir. It has vertical grooves spaced 8" (I think) and the ends are lapped.
    It was originally designed to replace the sheathing on a house. The idea was that it could be nicely stained and would look decent for a couple of years until the owner put real siding over it.
    In our part of the country (northern NH), it was introduced in the early 70's. Some folks have left it exposed for 30 years and so long as it's kept painted or stained it seems to hold up ok.
FWIW,
--
Larry
Email to rapp at lmr dot com
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Is is always necessary to replace the a section of t1-11 if just the bottom gets wet?
Is there a way to splice a section in?
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Last year a carpenter cut off the bottom 2" of my siding and put in a plastic product. I don't recommend that approach. It was expensive and has started to pull out.
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snipped-for-privacy@spam.invalid (biscuit) wrote in

You can cut off like the bottom foot of it. Seal that cut off end with primer. Then, where the foot was cut off put Hardi Plank. Careful not to cut off a foot and you can only get say 7" Hardi Plank! Where the joint between the new and old is put a 1x4. Prime the 1x4 on all surfaces after cutting and fitting then install with galvanized nails. Use a good Permanently Flexible" caulk where the new trim board meets the upper siding. Caulk the bottom of the new trim board to Hardi Plank to keep bugs and moisture out.
There are many homes where I am that have done this. It looks fine if a nice job is done.
If you want to do a bang up job on the trim board, bevel the edge so water can't sit there.
Endview of 1x4 |~\\ | \\ | | | | | | | | | | |---|
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Al Bundy wrote:

you should use flashing, they make such for t111 or for windows etc
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