T&P valve installation?

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Tony Hwang wrote:

Probably. However the Fabulous BeaterPorsche is due for a new front end soon (as in as soon as my new struts arrive, apparently being transported directly from Koni's factory in Holland by carrier snail,) and the HVAC guy is scheduled in two weeks to put in an A/C unit (house came without one, which is why we were able to afford the place.) Therefore, old tank will stay at least until the above expenditures are paid off. Plus it's a gas unit so I don't feel comfortable replacing it myself. A $16 T&P valve allowed me to keep washing clothes, cooking, and taking showers which are important parts of my daily routine :)
I'm contrary in that I do like to get the maximum possible utility out of an appliance rather than just replacing stuff "because it's old." If I replaced everything around here that was old, I'd have to start with everything in the driveway and work in :) (and I'd have to get an extra job or two...) Some call me cheap, but "frugal" has a nicer ring to it...
I do agree with the other comments that I'll probably just step up to 1" copper close to the tank and just do what looks right. I guess too many years of messing with fire alarms have made me a little to concerned about doing everything "to code."
nate
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Pete C. wrote:

Code or not, where is common sense?
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Google for building code online (your state). That should get you started.
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T - temperature P - pressure
If either goes too high, the valve will open. If you don't have a regulator or backflow preventer where the water comes into the house, The pressure can't go higher than the supply. Is that very high pressure? If not, pressure is not the problem. If you do have a regulator or backflow device, then you need an expansion tank to prevent releases.
Watch for releases after a long shower when no other water is used in the house while the water re-heats. If you have a backflow preventer and no expansion tank, that is when it will more likely discharge.
Temperature increases can also cause discharge. Any sign of excessive temp?
Bob
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Bob F wrote:

I do not see a backflow preventer, but the actual point where the water enters the house is hidden behind a closet for a couple feet so it might be in there. I don't know that I've ever seen one (grew up in a house with well water) how large is it and what would it look like? I do not have an expansion tank. I don't have any issues with excessive temperature. I did not notice any discharge after my shower this AM which was the first one I took after replacing the valve; I had seen it weep before when trying to raise the WH temp to ensure enough hot water (I eventually set it a little lower than I wanted to) and I assume that that is what happened and it never reseated properly.
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

You might want to look in a local public library for the building codes. Unfortunately, most building codes are copyrighted works and are not available for free on the internet.

If you are right about the code, and can not legally get the outlet to your sink, how about bringing the drain to the water heater? Add another drain plumbed to a tee with the sink's drain.
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M Q wrote:

The way I understand it, you can't plumb it straight into the drain, there needs to be a 6" air gap therefore the drain needs a P-trap, thus causing that whole idea to become waaaay more complicated than it initially sounds.
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Now it almost all cases, I believe in following the code. But if this were me, I'd just do it with the extra elbow, upsize the pipe if you like and be done with it. We all know it's not going to prevent the T&P valve from functioning.
It could possibly become an issue if the house is sold, during an inspection by the buyer or while getting a CO. But I doubt they are going to count the elbows. And if they do, it's a $5, 15 min fix. Just replace it with a 5 ft straight pipe that ends near the floor.
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so the tank is 18 years old and the T&P valve is bad.
if a leak can do real damage I would just replace the entire tank, its old and may leak after messing with the valve..
if a leak can do damage then change the tank entirely
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yeah i too would upsize the line and add extra elbow. this isnt rocket science
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Nate Nagel wrote:

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