T&P relief valve - nowhere to drain?

Page 13 of 13  


Yes.
Wrong. One is supposed to exercise the valve. This causes water to come out. Said water kills the grass. It really is that simple.
sdb

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You do not exercise "RELIEF VALVES" if you do it 90% of time will leak and it has to be replace get some info. from plumbers and if you are one of them I feel sorry for you clients Tony


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It's not *required* to be piped outside, no matter how many times Heybub says so...
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Pretty sure I read up on this one just recently...and recall needs to go almost to the floor leaving just enough room so as to comfortably fit your foot directly underneath so if someone messes with the pop-off it will only scald the living fuck outa your little piggy.
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Right from the warning tag....
Warning: To avoid water damage and/or scalding due to valve operation, a discharge line must be connected to valve and run to a safe place of disposal. The discharge line must be as short as possible and must be of the same size as the valve discharge connection throughout its entire length. The discharge line must pitch downward from the valve and terminate at least 6" (152 mm) above a drain where any discharge will be clearly visible. The discharge line must terminate through plain (unthreaded) pipe. Discharge material must conform to local plumbing code or A.S.M.E. requirements. Excessive length more than 30 feet (9.14 m), use of more than four elbows or bends in discharge piping, or reduction of discharge line size will cause a restriction and reduce the discharge capacity of the valve. No shut-off valve should be installed between the relief valve and the tank, or in the discharge line.
If they can't understand that... they need to call a professional!!!!
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<schnipperdazolsky>

Plumb as the feed line for your overhead fire supression system--my bets the inspecter will never catch it
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Bullshit, they are not required to be vented outside!!!!!
Matter of fact, it's against code to pipe them outside when they are subject to freezing weather! Now get a clue, dumbass!

You said they're not designed to leak. But in fact, many do...

When are you going to read up on PT valves and learn that you are *not* required to pipe them outside???? And that it's *against code* to do so, when they're subject to freezing temperatures????
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Oh my, you don't see the reason not to do it...
Try this for one, "because it's against code"!!!
What do you think is going to happen to a slow drip in freezing conditions?????
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David wrote:

Replace the water heater. Seven years for a three-year device is pretty good.
Around here, water under the water heater indicates a leaking tank.
The T&P valve is to prevent an EXPLODING water heater, not for piddly excess drainage.
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Thanks for all the quick advice, everyone. I was going by the manual for the heater (GH Wood Series Pro model JW525, which appears to have an 8-year warranty), which suggests that periodic opening of the T&P valve is normal.
Looks like I'll have to bring in a plumber no matter how you slice it. At least if it's the heater itself that's leaking, it seems to be still under warranty. I've got a jug under the T&P valve just to see if anything happens between now and when I call in the plumber tomorrow.
It doesn't appear to be a thermostat that's gone (the water is 133.5 F, by a pretty accurate thermometer). It would've been too easy if it were something that simple - I could've handled that on my own (electronics technician).
The pressure could be a problem. I had a PEX joint start to leak about a year ago, and the plumber (who didn't have a pressure gauge) turned down the pressure regulator at the main shutoff (it was wide open). Perhaps it needs to be turned down even further.
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David wrote:

You misunderstood. The pressure regulator *is* the problem. They contain a check valve which prevents the expansion pressure from dumping back to the city main. That's why the expansion tank is needed.
But do the bucket-under-the-relief test before doing anything.
Jim
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Also, TPR valves do go bad and fail to seat properly. Before I call in a plumber, I'd find out for sure where the water is coming from, which shouldn't be hard. It could be that you need an expansion tank as suggested. But it could also be a bad TPR which is available at home centers or plumbing supply and if you're at all capable, it's a quick and easy replacement for < $10.
As to where to try to route the water from TPR to, impossible to say here without seeing where it's located.
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It is not normal for it to do so by itself. It should be tested manually once or twice a year, and that is probably what the manual meant.
There is something wrong, and it needs attention now. When water heaters explode, they make quite a mess.

You can get such a meter at the local hardware store for $10. Normal is 50-80 psi.
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having a pressure gauge. Amazing.
Pressure regulators are generally also backflow preventors; they stop all water from flowing back past it. When the water heater comes on it will cause the water to expand, which will increase the pressure in the system. It can get high enough to cause the T&P valve to go. That is what everyone is talking about. An expansion tank will absorb the extra volume and stop the pressure from going up.
I can only go by my own experience. I installed a pressure regulator to get my pressure down from 90psi to 55psi. I then let the water heater cool off, and turned it up high. I figured that was the worst case senerio. My pressure only went from 55 to 85. I tried it again and concluded I didn't need an expansion tank. I don't know why other people do. BTW, my pressure regulator will allow backflow, but that feature clogs up and can't be counted on.
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Thanks once again for all the info, everyone.
Update: I've cut/torn out as much carpet and underlay as I could from around the heater, and I should be able to 'tip' the heater enough (with the assistance of a friend) tomorrow to get the remainder of the junk out from underneath it. The heater will then be sitting on the concrete foundation - which should make the tracking of water leaks somewhat easier.
After running a dishwasher load and washing machine load at the same time, it doesn't appear the T&P relief valve is letting go after all. There was nothing in the jug I placed below the drain tube.
So...now I'm wondering just where the water may have came from. My wife (who is short on technical knowledge but pretty good in the common sense department) suggested the heavy rainstorm we had a few days ago might've had something to do with it. Of course, the foundation is behind drywall...
I went so far as to remove the two access plates for the thermostats/ elements. No apparent signs of leakage, nor are there any signs of corrosion at all. The tank looks new.
I've currently got a dehumidifier stuck in the closet where the water heater is. I'll let it dry out nicely, get the remainder of the carpet and underlay out of there tomorrow, and then play the waiting game to see if water reappears. We've got a rain-free forecast for the next 5 days, so if anything appears near the water heater, it'll have to be coming from the tank.
I hate this crap. Give me a radar to fix anyday.
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