T 1-11 Siding application

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On Sunday, June 29, 2014 8:27:20 AM UTC-4, Mayayana wrote:

I see you've chosen to dig your hole deeper. Now you're lying. I never said anything of the sort. Try to pay attention. You said that Tyvek is just a wind barrier. That's not true. It's also there to prevent water infiltration if any water gets past the siding. Is it essential for a she d? No, but that doesn't change what Tyvek is, what it does.
despite that the shed is not normally

Sure, we should believe you rather than the company that makes and specs the product. But you're OK with them saying that it helps block wind, that's not marketing hype and lies. Go figure.
They're exploiting peoples' fear of water damage with a vague

You're an idiot.
Water *flowing* around or under siding

Sure, we should believe you rather than the company that makes it. How about This Old House video, are they lying too? They show Tyvek being installed and how it shields against water getting in:
http://www.bobvila.com/sections/tv-shows/projects/16-lifespan-house/episode s/193-framing-the-roof/videos/1099426141001-tyvek-house-wrap-installation#. U7AK8nlOV9A
United State Gypsum lying too?:
"Water repellent barrier protection for exterior drywall systems DuPont(tm) Tyvek(R) StuccoWrap(R) has an engineered grooved surface that can help bet ter manage water when installed as a drainage plane. "
It would seem USG that makes exterior building products surely knows about what Tyvek is to be used for, how it works to protect their siding products.
How about the International Building Code:
"SECTION R703 EXTERIOR COVERING
R703.1 General. Exterior walls shall provide the building with a weather-resistant exterior wall envelope. The exterior wall envelope shall include flashing as descri bed in Section R703.8.
"R703.1.1 Water resistance. The exterior wall envelope shall be designed and constructed in a manner th at prevents the accumulation of water within the wall assembly by providing a water-resistant barrier behind the exterior veneer as required by Sectio n R703.2 and a means of draining to the exterior water that enters the asse mbly. "

No siding system is perfect. I guess the concept of not relying on just one thing is foreign to you. See the IRC code above.

And again, I never sais she should, idiot.

She can read up on Tyvek, read the building code I cited and what you just said about relying only on siding to keep out water and then she'll know for sure that you don't know what you're talking about.
But feel free to dig deeper.
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Or more commonly, 2x6s providing additional cavity space for insulation.

Or more commonly, OSB (oriented strand board) on the outside.

Or more commonly to prevent moisture damage due to condensation within the wall cavity.
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On Mon, 30 Jun 2014 15:29:36 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

to liquid penetration, so it helps keep walls and insulation dry.
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It's not common, but...
The exterior of my 1956 2 story colonial is sheathed with 1x8 T&G boards, both the walls and the roof.
The interior has 3/8” x 12 T&G gypsum drywall board covered with 3/8" of plaster, as shown in images 3 & 4 at this site:
http://www.fireengineering.com/articles/2014/03/construction-concerns-plaster.html
Yep, the interior walls are 3/4" thick.

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I think "common" varies over the years. My in-laws 100 year old house is similar to yours.
The walls are balloon framed with 2x4's (really 2" x 4").
The interior has wood lath and plaster that is almost 3/4" thick.
The exterior has 1x6 wood siding nailed directly to the studs, something like this:
http://www.coxhardware.com/p-9605-1-x-6-2-yellow-pine-siding-117- lengths.aspx
There is no exterior sheathing, and certainly no tar paper or house wrap. There's very little in the way of diagonal bracing to prevent racking. It still amazes me the house has lasted 100 years and still going strong.
Of course, there was no insulation either, so everything breathed fairly well. Todays houses are built much tighter, so moisture control is critical to prevent mold growth.
On the other hand, a simple unfinished structure with no heat or insulation (like a shed) doesn't need housewraps or moisture barriers.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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