Synthetic oil and follow-up oil changes?

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I went to the Jiffy Lube this weekend and thought I'd splurge and put in some Castrol Syntec as they were having a sale on it, (vehicle 2007 Toyota RAV4). When I asked for the Syntec the guy said that once you go to a synthetic oil, you should stay on it and not go back to regular oil. Well since the the regular cost of a Syntec oil change is double, I said forget it and just put in regular oil.
First, is it true what the guy said about it being "bad" to go back to regular oil after using synthetic? If so, why? I had a car in early the 90's that loved Mobile 1, ran great on it, I dont remember dedicating that car to Mobile 1 though for all time, I'm sure I used all different oils.
Thanks Rick
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Rick:
Not true .Synthetic motor oils are completely compatible with mineral motor oils.
Pierre
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I wouldn't think it would matter or there would be a warning on the label. Anyway, how long will you own that car? Most of todays cars can run 200-300K without any major problems. Why pay the extra? No one hs ever asked me what kind of oil I used when they were buying a car (or anything witha motor) from me.
Hank
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You're right. I sold my 95 Avalon (first year they were made) last year at 270,000 miles and the engine ran as quitely as day 1, so did the transmission. A compression test on that Toyota V6 showed excellent, even, pressure on all cylinders.
I let it go mostly because of other "little" stuff like door locks sticking, windows sluggish, a small AC leak, etc. The guy who got the car (my brother in law) is still driving it over 350K, he was down on his luck and needed a car.
I used sythetic oil in that car maybe 3 times, but they never "warned" me about changing back.
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In researching synthetic oil use, a while back, the only generalized comment was that you do not want to convert an older, well worn car to pure synthetic.
The reasoning was that the non-synthetic/conventional oils for older vehicles have *seal conditioners* etc.. in the oil to help keep the well worn and old rubber seals from leaking ?
I do not have any sources for the truth/proof of this belief.
Most people with an opinion and maybe some knowledge believed that all age cars can benefit from synthetic.
So, i typically use 1 quart of pure synthetic and top off rest with conventional oil (~ 2-3 quarts) on my older vehicles in whatever brand oil i am using (eg. mobile / castrol),
in my case that is Castrol Syntec and Castrol GTX high mileage or Mobile 1 and Mobile high mileage etc.
The other point many commentors made was to avoid the "blended" (synthetic + conventional) products as you can blend your own.
well i hope that was worth $0.02 (US)
robb
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They just want you back buying the better-more expensive oil, a bit more profit for them.
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On Mon, 31 Aug 2009 13:08:11 -0700 (PDT), RickH

What the hell does this have to do with home repair? I'm sure you could find a group that was appropriate for your question. You may even get a correct answer.
Gordon Shumway
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Gordon Shumway wrote:

What it has to do with home repair, is that the OP should be doing the oil change at home, properly. A trained chipmunk could do a better job than Jip-me Lube.
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I changed my own oil for 30 years 72-02, now I'd much rather do other things, I've paid my dues and earned the money to let some well- trained chipmunks do it. I have better uses for the 20 or so years I have left in this mortal coil :)
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I changed my own oil for 30 years 72-02, now I'd much rather do other things, I've paid my dues and earned the money to let some well- trained chipmunks do it. I have better uses for the 20 or so years I have left in this mortal coil :)
***********************************************
I did my own from 62 to 91. Then I crawled under my Regal and found it to be quite a PITA and have happily paid since then. ONly reason I finished that change was becuase I already had the filter.
I change oil every 7000 miles and on the last four cars, I recall having to add oil only once between changes. I've also put well over 120k and never had an internal engine problems so I don't see the value of synthetic. It is better, bt not needed in most cars under normal conditions.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I only have trucks, so service on them tends to be a good deal easier. No crawling under, just roll under on the creeper with plenty of room. My newest truck has a top mounted cartridge type oil filter that is quite easy to work on, just need an old AL pie pan to put under the old filter element after you lift it out so it doesn't drip everywhere.
I've used nothing but synthetic for the last couple decades and I'm quite happy with that. The latest truck also has dual turbos, and the synthetic oils have higher temperature tolerance and resistance to "cooking" in the turbo bearings when you shut off the engine, so they provide extra protection there.
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Ya know, a lot of folks ask about internal combustion engines here for their 20 year old 5-bucks-at-a-garage-sale lawn mowers.
A car is the second or third largest expense for most folks, and that answer could be applied to other engines too.
Sheesh
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On Mon, 31 Aug 2009 19:08:39 -0700 (PDT), windcrest

With that flawed logic you probably think it proper to discuss quantum mechanics in this group too because those principles are at work in our homes. Taking it one step further we might as well combine all discussion groups into one because we are either at home or not when everything happens.
Gordon Shumway
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I bought a ATV several years ago and the dealer told me the same thing - "If you break it in on synthetic you need to keep using it or it will burn oil with conventional oil". I bought a ZTR mower this year and the service manager told me the same thing. I don't know if it's true or not but there are a lot of service departments telling their customers that it is.
Red
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In regards to ATV's, depending on the type of clutch, using synthetic oil can make the clutch slip (usually on wet multi-plate clutches).
Hank
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RickH wrote:

back to regular you change more often. Jetta Diesels specify synthetic for longevity and fewer oil changes. VW also pays for the first 3 or 4 oil changes.
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Van Chocstraw wrote:

Synthetics are particularly helpful for engines with turbos as the synthetics have higher temperature tolerance and resistance to "cooking" in the turbo bearings after you shut the engine off.
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some cars require synthetic. for example, corvettes starting in the late 80s required moble 1 or equivalent.
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I wonder just how this "shop" would explain away blended oils (synthetic+dino blend) sold by just about every brand out there ??
RickH wrote:

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On Mon, 31 Aug 2009 13:08:11 -0700 (PDT), RickH

Yes it is true. It is always best to stay with the same oil, same brand. If you buy a used car, continue with the same oil as the previous owner. Engines may run differently, depending on viscosity, detergents, and additives. It is best to stick with the manufacturer's recommendations, although I've always changed oil every 3,000 miles. Oil breaks down over time, synthetics also but slower. As a DIY, I would expect you would change your own oil--it's a fast and easy job and allows you to inspect for possible problems elsewhere.
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