Switching an outdoor outlet between GFCI Circuits

I would like to connect an existing outdoor outlet to a GFCI circuit that is on a timer during the Christmas season. I was considering using a three way switch to toggle between the hot side of the two circuits. Will this work? Is there a better way to do this?
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2014 19:44:01 +0000, utguy53

The short answer is no. If you do not switch the hot and the neutral, it will trip the GFCI as soon as you add any load.
If you can find a DPDT switch it will work.
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2014 19:44:01 +0000, utguy53

Something like a Cooper 2226
http://www.cooperindustries.com/content/dam/public/wiringdevices/BuyersGuides/AHBG/E/AHBG-E-09.pdf
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On Monday, December 29, 2014 2:44:05 PM UTC-5, utguy53 wrote:

As I understand your plan, with that switch in one of its positions, the re turn path (neutral leg) for that outlet would be reaching the panel via a d ifferent cable than its hot leg is. I'm pretty sure that's a code violation , because it could result in an unprotected overcurrent in the neutral (if there are other loads on it too) and more obscurely, currents can be genera ted within metallic boxes when electricity passes into and out of them thro ugh different paths.
I'm sure you've considered putting in a new timer controlling the outlet in question, and just getting an outdoor timer, and would be interested in he aring why those aren't your first choices.
Chip C Toronto
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replying to Chip C , Utguy53 wrote:

I have a timer circuit through my pool equipment that I am using to control other outlets. I want the lights to be activated at the same time. The rest of the year I want the outlet to be always on as it is now. This requirement drove me to explore what my options are.
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UTguy53-
Consider extending the GFCI circuit permanently. That way you will not have to worry about different current paths tripping the GFCI. (I understand recent electrical codes require outdoor outlets to be GFCI.)
If you do that, you could use a switch to bypass the timer.
Fred
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I missed your recent post!
To do what you want, I think the best approach would be to put a SPDT switch at the timer. The common lead would be connected (along with ground and neutral) to the existing outdoor outlet. The other switch contacts would be connected to the hot leads at input and output of the timer. That way you would avoid tripping the GFCI, although you would lose its protection.
If that requires running too much wire back to the timer, how about bringing the input side of the GFCI to the existing outlet and switching there?
Fred
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2014 19:44:01 +0000, utguy53

I'm not sure exactly what you are trying to do, but since the GFCI is REQUIRED by code for an outdoor receptacle, all you want to do is bypass the timer. Most timers have a bypass switch on them. If not, get a better timer. Or you can probably just put a switch that bypasses the timer. But by the time you do all of that, timers are not that costly.
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