Switch on old stereo receiver

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Very versatile advice.
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Christopher A. Young
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Puddin' Man wrote:

When it goes off, does the button mechanically move out, or does it stay exactly where it was when it was on?
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It feels like it edges out a mm or 2 when the circuit opens and the unit powers off.
P
"Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens!" -Friedrich Schiller
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Puddin' Man wrote:

I'm thinking the little mechanical spring-and-groove linkage that makes the switch stay in one of two positions (i.e. on or off) isn't working. If that's the case, contact cleaner won't work and your only options are switch replacement, or having someone wire across the switch to make it always "on" and using an external switch, or unplugging it, to turn it on and off.
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The best contact cleaner to use is DeoxIT, actually improves electrical connections/contacts OR use the whole can of a generic contact cleaner and it may or may not work for a short period of time. DeoxIT is unbelievable. www.deoxit.com or http://store.caig.com/s.nl/sc.15/category.295/.f for distributor info. Good luck Mike
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One of a number of things that I fear, and will be on the lookout for.
Thx, P
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Suggestions by others may work but here is one more. Check the local shoppers paper in your area and see if there is a radio restorer or electronics repair guy. Some will do a simple job like that at a reasonable price and he may have a box full of switches he can substitute. If you took it to a real authorized repair shop they'd want $50 just to look at it, bus some part time tinkerers will look at it as a challenge to fix, not a means of making money.
A few years back I found a guy like that. I had a $500 circuit board from a machine that needed repair. One place would repair it for $250, saving that much over a new board. Found a local guy working in his basement and he repaired it while I waited and hesitated to ask $5. I gave him $10 and we were both happy.
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I fear it's more like $75 hereabouts.

That kinda feller might be extremely rare nowadaze.

That's a nice story. Wish there were more like him.
Thx, P
"Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens!" -Friedrich Schiller
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I might as well toss in my 10 cents worth: buy a can of spray contact cleaner, unplug the receiver, then spray the hell out of that switch with it in all its positions. Spray it, work it, spray it again. Repeat several times. Let it dry before you try to use the receiver again. While you're at it you might as well squirt some in all the pots while you twist them back and forth.
You will probably have to take the cover off to really get the switch clean but it's worth it to try it without doing that first. What do you have to lose?
One thing I definitely would not do is spray it with WD-40. That stuff gets gummy after a period of time. Use contact cleaner... easily obtained at any Radio Shack or Lowes. A big spray can is only a few bucks.
If that doesn't work then take it to a repair place that still works on analog equipment. But I'd be willing to bet you'll get it to work with the contact cleaner. Excellent stuff.
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Mortimer Schnerd, RN
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I knew an old TV repairman who swore by WD-40 for cleaning tuners, and volume controls. Wonder if he's still alive?
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Christopher A. Young
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Puddin' Man wrote:

Found this through a link in another thread. Give these folks a try.
http://www.vintage-electronics.cc /
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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