Switch on old stereo receiver

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Old Technics stereo receiver, circa 1988.
Power switch. Button in in - unit is powered. Button in out - unit is unpowered.
Now, if I just push the button to power it, it powers itself, then powers down. If I push the button in and release it -very- slowly, it'll stay on.
Any feel for what I'd have to go thru to repair or replace the switch? Unplugging the unit to put it on a workbench is only slightly less unpleasant than an enema with a firehose. :-)
Thx, Puddin'
"Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens!" -Friedrich Schiller
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On Thu, 06 Sep 2007 14:38:30 +0000, Puddin' Man wrote:

If you can figure out how to open up case, you may be able to replace switch provided you can find one which is compatible with space and opening on chassis. You could always cobble together something which would work.
Chances are it is only a matter of squirting some cleaning fluid into the switch and working it a few times to free up years of accumulated gunk.
I would first purchase some electronics cleaner at an auto parts store or Radio Shack. Open up chassis to access switch. Squirt the cleaner into switch wherever I could. Work switch a few times with power off, of course.
Plug in unit and see if it makes a difference.
This also works for scratchy volume controls.
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The advice below is good with one caveat...
Most electronics cleaning fluids, and other things that people use for that purpose like WD-40, have flammamble solvents in them. And unlike things like the volume control, that switch probably carries enough power to make a spark that could ignite said fluid.
So after you do the cleaning, make really sure the thing's completely dry before plugging it in! Oh and of course *before* you do the cleaning, *un*plug it.
Eric Law

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message
Or you can use DeoxIT, actually improves electrical connections. One or two squirts will do the trick. They have three spray versions, one economy one with a flammable solvent, one nonflammable and quick drying and one with no solvent - just 100% deoxIT. Link: http://store.caig.com/s.nl/it.I/id.66/.f
Mike
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It sounds like the problem is not with the electrical contacts inside the switch (because the amplifier does turn on), but with the mechanical latch mechanism that implements push-on/push-off. And that's probably due to dried grease.
DeoxIT might actually work to clean the mechanical parts, but that's not what it's designed for (and it's pretty expensive). I'd clean the mechanical parts with something like naphtha (lighter fluid), then relubricate with grease after it had dried.
    Dave
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On Sat, 8 Sep 2007 01:24:28 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@cs.ubc.ca (Dave Martindale) wrote:

What kinda grease? Lithium grease (I got handy)?
I opened the case, did an inspection. The push-button with mehanical contact is soldered to a small board with speaker selection buttons and earphone jack. I couldn't even get the board fully loose.
The switch sez M7 TV-4 4A/64A250V.
I dunno ...
Thx, P
"Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens!" -Friedrich Schiller
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Pudding Dot Man At Gmail Dot Com writes:

White lithium grease is probably fine.
    Dave
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Dave Martindale wrote:

Hi, Lubriplate grease or spray(if it does not attack plastic housing) from electronics parts store like old radio shack(it's called Sosurce now up here in Canada). Think that push button toggle switch spring inside is getting old.
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Dave Martindale wrote:

Perhaps, depending on what else if anything is in it...one of the specific-purposes dielectric greases would be more certain unless it mentions being a dielectric...
--
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There's more than one?

What I got is an ancient can of brown all-purpose grease and an aerosol can of all-purpose white (no mention of dielectric properties).
Suppose I need an all-purpose dielectric grease for everything from spark plugs to stereo switches, etc. Price/availability?
Thx, P
"Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens!" -Friedrich Schiller
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Puddin' Man wrote:

There are a veritable plethora, but I was meaning in the sense of being specifically electrical-purpose dielectric just to be sure it didn't have an undesirable additive.
The bulk greases are readily available in small tubes quite inexpensively from any automotive supply. For your switch, you probably need aerosol and the contact types are available at Radio Shack or most any quality electronics supply -- the regular electrical supply places, probably, but sure to be at the electronics guys...
--
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Puddin' Man wrote:

Lubriplate is widely available and not expensive at all.
https://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/store/ProductDetail.aspx?pe24&title=LUBRIPLATE for one source found randomly on a search engine.
--
If you really believe carbon dioxide causes global warming,
you should stop exhaling.
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On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 11:30:39 -0500, clifto wrote:

https://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/store/ProductDetail.aspx?pe24&title=LUBRIPLATE
One doesn't want to lubricate surfaces that transfer voltages, audio signals etc... Lubriplate is decent but not where contacts, wipers etc.. touch each other. I use White Lithium in an aerosol can with a tube applicator. It's been used for many years by the manufacturers.
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If I may add (speaking from exeperience) before you plug it in and try it, make sure that all the fumes from the cleaner have evaporated from INSIDE the switch. I had a small fire once.
OTherwise I would buy a power strip with an on/off switch. The chances of finding a new switch that fits and is cheap is very slim. Try the cleaning first

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wrote:

If none of the above works, just leave the switch in the ON position and use a power strip to shut it off. Thats the easiest solution, and if the switch dies entirely, you can just solder the wires together that go to the switch and continue to use the power strip.
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The low tech answer would be to put a switch in the power cord. Lower would be to unplug to turn off, plug to turn on. Lazy would be to give it to a shop for repair. Modern would be to upgrade to a new system.
Although all of these would be better than the firehose, Franz's ideas are the way to go.
FMB (North Mexico)
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On Thu, 06 Sep 2007 14:38:30 GMT, Puddin' Man

How about leaving that switch on (or bypassing it) and switching the power?
(missing sig separator of "-- "?)

--
110 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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wrote:

Don't think it'd work. Switch is making partial contact. It's working now, but if I stomp on the floor or a heavy truck goes by ...

That's a possibility -if- cleaning/fiddling doesn't work. I doubt I could find a replacement switch for reasonable money.
First I gotta find time to draw a diagram of all inputs, outputs and put it on the workbench. Aaaaargh!

Somebody else's convention, not mine.
Thx, P
"Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens!" -Friedrich Schiller
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Take it from an old stereo collector. Get some Deoxit from www.partsexpress.com. The switches including volume pots get dirty, corroded, etc. Squirt some Deoxit in the switch with a paper towel underneath for drips. Work the switch back and forth 10-20 times while unplugged. Give that a try. I can't tell you how many vintage receivers that I picked up for almost nothing at thrift stores that had problems with the pots and switches. Deoxit works on many switch types even car window/door lock switches that the dealer wants mega bucks to replace. Most of the time the contacts are just dirty.
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On Thu, 06 Sep 2007 14:38:30 +0000, Puddin' Man wrote:

Speaking as a former major brands warranty tech, the chances of you finding a new OEM replacement switch are little to none. Buy a power strip with a switch, plug the receiver into it and use the power strip to turn it off and on.
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