Swimming pool conversion

Page 1 of 3  
I'm considering the idea of converting our 55,000 litre swimming pool (better known as the money well) into a rainwater tank. It's inground and made of very thick and solid concrete, with no leaks. Has anybody out there done this or heard of it being done. From what I have read, it seems feasible, and the pump on the pool now appears to be the right power to supply the house.
Any and all hints and tips would be appreciated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne wrote:

Not sure this is a good idea. How will you treat the water? The same system that filters and chlorinates the water in the pool does not make it potable. I think it's a legionaire's disease/mosquito/cryptosporidium/giardia breeding ground waiting to happen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
louie wrote:

Hi Louie I had thought of that as well. My idea was to have a concrete lid built onto it, with a well sealed access point for cleaning and sludge removal, along with a filtering system on the inlet points. That is what the water authorities reccomend on normal tanks. So provided it is sealed the mosquitos won't be an issue. As to the rest, any info would be good.
The filter system on it currently is a sand system, so there'd be no chemicals involved.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Take $100,000 and one gallon of gas. Mix well. Ignite.
You will have the same result as messing with this idea.
Unless you are just thinking of a way to make a swamp, a sewer, or holding tank for irrigation water.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

Hi Steve Okay you'll have to work on the theory that I'm a dummy here, because never having looked at anything like this before, there are going to be a lot of theories and situations I have no knowledge on. Can you explain to me your thinking on this please. Wayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just keep it simple.
What do you intend to use the water for? What size of a management program would be required to store and maintain that quality of water? Is it worth the cost of building a storage facility when there is water available from other cheap sources?
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

The intention is to use it for showering, washing, flushing toilets etc, we use bottled water for drinking and cooking. Management program? This is a two storey house..... not getting you there. The pool is built, full, and simply needs a well fitted cover, yep there will be cost there, but I'm working those out as we go. I don't know where you are Steve, but here in Sydney Australia, we are under very tight water regulations, and it looks like they are going to put the price of water up tremendously very soon. Our reservoir here is currently at around 42% of capacity, and is going down not up. Cheers Wayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it were just that simple. Storing XX,000 gallons of water, and keeping it safe to use is not a small task.
Even though you say you will only use the water for showering, etc., you can ingest protozoans that are in the water by simply getting them on your lips during showering. Protozoans that cause dysentery and that are difficult to treat, even with modern medicine. Some incidents have been fatal.
Your questioning of the term "management program" indicates that you have not done a lot of homework on this. What you propose is plausible. It's doable. But you aren't going to be able to just use your swimming pool as a water reservoir without some "management program", just as you can't simply swim in your pool without a "management program" that involves monitoring and treating the water. And such a simple solution as you propose of adding a tight fitting cover is not going to be anything that is close to easy.
Good luck in your adventure.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

***Wayne: - Precisely why I am asking these questions, obviously there are those of you out there who have some of the answers.

***Wayne - Which is exactly why all these questions, did you think these were just random thoughts?

***Wayne - I'm not looking for a simple solution, if there is a management program neccessary, then that is what will have to be implemented. I truly do appreciate your concern over our health, but have to remind you that up until two years ago, I lived in the country and lived in a home serviced by a 500 litre tank. Never had a problem with any diseases, and it tasted better and more pure than any "town water" I have ever tasted. Steve I'm 47 years old, not prone to idylles, simply a better solution to a problem. If you aren't going to help with specifics, please leave it to those who will, there are others on here that have offered possible solutions and suggestions.
Committed to finding out whether this is an economical, sensible way to go. Wayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne wrote: Sorry I meant 5000 litre not 500.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne wrote:

Its a interesting idea. theres the cost of the cover, the filter and pumps to get the water in the house and the cost of power to keep the water pumps and filters working.
fi;ltering for toliets etc can be kinda crude, showeing demands much better.
so assume you have this big tank, and are using water.
how will you replenish the tank?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Wayne Okay let's take this step by step. The cover will cost X amount of money which I'm prepared to do, the filter already exists and is a sand filter, and will cost the same amount as running this as a swimming pool. My theory is that as it is adequate as a pool filter, it should be adequate to filter for showering, washing and toilet flushing, and we use spring water for drinking and cooking and have done for the last couple of years. As to "are you using water", I was considering using alcohol, but as it's currently full of WATER, and the cost of 55,000 litres of even the cheapest alcohol in Australia would come to about $120000 dollars, I figured water was the best way to go. Therefore, we will use the traditional method of allowing the skies to administer the additional liquid to the said tank. For god's sake read the previous posts or don't bother.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

There is one word in your post that I hate, hate, hate, hate, hate.
That word is "should."
That "should" work.
When it comes to health issues, should is not acceptable.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

Then substitute "does" as in "does work" since exactly what the OP is proposing is commonly done in many parts of the world, even in some areas of the US.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

I'm sorry to say (ok, not so sorry) that you are way, way off base there. Large rainwater collection tanks are very common in many parts of the world and work just fine. Indeed I seem to recall This Old House did a project in Bermuda and spent most of one episode covering the rainwater tanks that provide the bulk of the domestic water there.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pete C. wrote:

G'day Pete Thanks for the tip, I'll have a look at their online site to see if there is some sort of transcript on these systems. Being in Australia, I haven't seen that show, although it's probably on cable somewhere. Cheers Wayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
louie writes:

Properly maintained pool water is sterile. The problem is, it is not always properly maintained.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I don't see why it wouldn't work Wayne. The way we have been pushed rain water tanks over the past few years, i am surprised that I have not heard of the idea before. There are many older houses around Sydney that have underground storage tanks and that is really all that you are proposing. It would be easy to channel rainwater into it and the standard pump would be adequate to get the water out of it. You may want to think about a smaller, elevated intermediate tank with a float valve to act a s a buffer between the pool and the house.
How about talking to someone like Dural Irrigation for some ideas.
http://www.duralirrigation.com.au/onlinestore/index.cfm?NavigationID01
Now if I can only convince the better half that we don't need the pool....
Good luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Avery wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Avery wrote:

Hi Avery I have sent a query to another irrigation specialist, but will give Dural a go as well, the more the merrier I say. I dont know that this has been tried before, but I'm determined that either this will happen or it will become a hole filled with dirt. No more money drain for me mate! Thanks for the lead. I'll keep posting here to keep things up to date. Wayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.