sweating copper

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90 degree elbows into a square? How terribly stupid of me.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

and applying heat to the fitting, with the pipe inside it, heats them both.

For crying out loud, clare, you don't have to heat the whole damn pipe, just enough of it to bond the solder!

You're wasting time and gas. Clean and flux everything, assemble the joint, and apply heat to the fitting *only*. After a few seconds, touch the solder to the *pipe* 180 degrees away from the flame. When it's at melting temp, the solder flows into the joint smoothly, filling the joing completely, without overheated fittings or burnt flux -- in about HALF the time it takes doing it your way.
There is absolutely no need to heat the pipe first, then the fitting.
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On Thu, 9 Feb 2012 02:34:38 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

with mapp gas on my "propane" torch. It IS a high swirl turbo-torch - unless I use the acelelyne torch.
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I've had best success with touching the solder to the side away from the flame, from the beginning. The correct temperature is reached, the solder flows. If the heat is too hot, the flux dries off, and gives a bad joint. The only way to know when the correct moment is by either years of experience, or touching the solder from the very start.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
The joint should be hot enough so that the solder melts easily when you touch it to the joint. Get the joint hot, then touch the solder to it. If it doesn't melt, take the solder away and continue heating.
If you can't do it, then either you have a torch that is too small, isn't turned on enough, or is defective for some reason.
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On 2/6/2012 3:22 PM, teabird wrote:

When using lead free solder on copper water pipe, I've found the paste flux that contains powdered lead free solder the best thing to use. I get a good joint every time. You can buy small containers of Oatey #95 lead free tinning flux at Lowe's and Home Depot.
http://preview.tinyurl.com/7u5luql
TDD
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On 2/6/2012 3:22 PM, teabird wrote:

In addition to the other good advice You may be melting the solder with the torch. The pipe needs to be hot enough to melt the solder [torch can help].
It is also possible to heat the joint too hot and screw up the flux. (Not likely what is happening.)
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On Mon, 6 Feb 2012 14:33:26 -0800 (PST), Michael B

preparation. A fingerprint on the joint can cause a leak that doesn't show up for a day or two.
Don't ask how I know. I ended up taking it apart and cleaning it all up and soldering it. Never had a solder joint leak on me.
Where I can't solder because of flamible materials or no access I use a "sharkbite"
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On Mon, 6 Feb 2012 18:19:53 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

In my experience, that stuff is a CURSE.
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On Tue, 07 Feb 2012 19:24:53 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Some of us still have a stash of the good stuff.
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On 02/07/2012 08:52 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I hope you don't use lead solder on pipes carrying potable water.
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On 2/7/2012 9:12 PM, cjt wrote:

all we used for decades. no need to change just because some gubmint pinhead pencil pusher decided we should. No lead free shit in my tool kit.
--
Steve Barker
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On 02/07/2012 10:07 PM, Steve Barker wrote:

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The house I lived in for 15 years had a lead main water line, as did hundreds of other houses built at that time in the late 40s. Millions of homes have copper and lead soldered joints. I don't know of anyone that was affected.
I drink water every day at work. The copper was installed in the 50's or so.
I bet that just dashed your hopes and dreams.
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead_poisoning
Lead poisoning (also known as plumbism, colica Pictonum, saturnism, Devon colic, or painter's colic) is a medical condition caused by increased levels of the heavy metal lead in the body. Lead interferes with a variety of body processes and is toxic to many organs and tissues including the heart, bones, intestines, kidneys, and reproductive and nervous systems. It interferes with the development of the nervous system and is therefore particularly toxic to children, causing potentially permanent learning and behavior disorders. Symptoms include abdominal pain, confusion, headache, anemia, irritability, and in severe cases seizures, coma, and death.
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On 2/8/2012 5:05 AM, Barney Fife wrote:

very informative there mr. wiki. Probably not accurate though, and what the hell's that got to do with plumbing? We're soldering with the shit, not eating it.
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Steve Barker
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On 2/8/2012 8:43 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

One of the symptoms of lead poising is irritability...and I can't help but notice that your seem easily irritated. You might wanna have that checked out.
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This seems to be the standard warning on many of the drugs advertised on the TV. The ones that are perscribed by the doctors.
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On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 06:05:20 -0500, Barney Fife

Many decades ago, in the 1950's & 60s my father had lead poisoning. He worked for the National Lead Company long before OSHA regulations were thought of.
A couple of solder joints is not going to do all of that. There is very little actual exposure in a properly made joint.
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On 2/8/2012 4:48 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

hell back in the day, they used to ADD lead to drinks to enhance the flavor. More gubmint control.... sigh....
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Steve Barker
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On 2/8/2012 4:48 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I do believe that minerals in the water coat the insides of pipes and basically seal the lead in. Of course, I could be wrong but I could have sworn I read that somewhere, sometime. o_O
TDD
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