sweat fitting?

What is a sweat fitting and how do you do it? I just bought a cabin and it has all copper piping. A neighbor told me that it is very difficult and very expensive to get a Plummer up here. I want to add a water filter to the line from the well and it is all copper.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Evon wrote:

Sweat fittings are just the copper fittings that you solder using solder made for that use.
Get yourself a book that covers plumbing. It will have written instructions and pictures to help you learn. Get a good torch, it will be worth the little additional expense. Buy some fittings and a little pipe to practice with. Get a pipe cuter at the same time. Read the part about using bread to keep the area dry in the book. It really works.
A trip to the DIY store should get you all the stuff you need without paying too much. This is a skill that anyone can learn without much effort and do an OK job, but do practice before you try the real thing so you have the feel for it.
--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Evon wrote:

http://www.misterfixit.com/nosweat.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It is pretty easy once you have the hang of it; but I would hate to try to learn it from a book rather than from a person, though I suppose it is possible.
There are epoxy glues made to take the place of solder. If you only plan on doing a few, it is probably easier to glue than to learn to solder; and cheaper than buying all the gear.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
toller wrote:

Interesting...I learn something every day!
Anyone here with actual experience with this stuff? Do your local inspectors let you use it?
http://www.justforcopper.com /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
toller wrote:

This stuff? http://www.noblecompany.com/copper.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've used it. It's OK but I think I work just as fast with a torch and solder. You must follow the directions exactly or it will leak every time. For just a couple of joints in a hurry, I'd use it again.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No Sweat. Honest. you don't have to sweat anything to install most filters. You just cut the line and use the compression fittings supplied.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
as edwin said, i would consider compression fittings if they will work.

No Sweat. Honest. you don't have to sweat anything to install most filters. You just cut the line and use the compression fittings supplied.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just thought I would add a few tricks I've learned over the years.
1) Get a few pieces of shingle step flashing that you can use when heating pipes close to anything burnable, I've gone as far as adding a wet rag behind the flashing just to keep everything cool.
2) Keep some old bread around if the pipe is on a bit of a down angle and the water keeps dripping stuff a piece of bread in there about 6 inches back to help keep the working pipe end dry.
3) A shop vacuum is great way to get water out of pipes that are really hard to drain.
4) When in doubt add more soldering paste.
5) Clean, Clean Clean those fittings (roughing up the contact area between each pipe) Sand paper, wire brush or my favourite a battery post cleaner.
HOPE THIS HELPS SOMEONE
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HotRod wrote: ...

Ever have trouble getting the soggy remnants out? Hadn't thought of that though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Duane Bozarth wrote:

angle and

inches back

When the water flows through the pipe the soggies break into smaller and smaller pieces till they just pass through whatever spigot or whatever is open. If you're concerned, when turning the water back on, have a downstream faucet already open and with its aerator screen removed. Flush a few gallons through, and you're good to go. You want to flush out any internal slag anyway.
%mod%
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HotRod wrote:

between
cleaner.
I have a tool with "innie" and "outie" wire brushes to clean the outside of 1/2" and 3/4" ID copper pipe and the inside of their respective fittings. It's like a battery post brush on steroids. I think I bought it at the BORG, but "real" suppliers have them as well, as well as more specific sizes which can be useful in cramped quarters where the multi-tool can't fit.
%mod%
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The biggest trick in sweating copper pipe is getting everything clean, shiny clean. I use steel wool. Then work some flux into your clean pipe and fitting, heat and apply solder. If you are doing it right the solder will wick up into the joint.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Never even bothered to take the bread back out, turn on the tap and it will find it's own way. The only problems I've ever had was getting wood chunks (from drilling holes) stuck in the cooper pipe after I shove them through small holes. I know use a shop vacuum to try and suck out such things before I put the taps on.
Just on note for the newbie.
If you clean the pipe and add enough solder paste you can solder your fittings upside down, most people tend to think that they need gravity. I fit everything together and then solder it in place, I usually keep a wet towel around to cool down joints if I need too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.