Surge protectors in series

Page 3 of 3  


Which is why all those incoming utilities must be properly earth - ie 'whole house' protectors. Did he forget to mention phone lines already have a 'whole house' protector install for free at every home? And that is point. Every incoming wire must be earthed. AC electric is the missing protection and the source of most all surge damage.
Numbers from the IEEE Standards. A properly earthed 'whole house' protector provides 99.5% protection. From that IEEE Standard:

Massive protection at $1 per protected appliance using a 'whole house' protector. For an additional 0.2% protection, bud recommends spending $5000 on obscenely profitable plug-in protectors. bud even forgets what his sources also say: Page 42 Figure 8. Without that 'whole house' protector, the 0.2% protecton can, instead, contribute to appliance damage.
Without a 'whole house' protector and upgraded earthing, a $25 or $150 power strip protector can even earth a surge 8000 volts destructively through adjacent appliances. Page 42 Figure 8. Why does bud avoid that fact? Profits at risk.
Where is this power strip spec that claims protection? Why does bud, whose income is promoting these devices - why does he still not provide those numeric specifications? Because no plug-in protector claims that protection.
"Protectors in series" assumes protectors will somehow stop and absorb what three miles of sky could not even stop. So many long half truths from bud combined with insults .... and he still cannot find even one numeric specification that actually claims protection.
A protector is only as effective as its earth ground. Either surge energy is absorbed harmlessly in earth OR it finds destructive paths to earth via appliances. "Protectors in series" will stop what three miles of sky could not? Nonsense. Even power strips connected three miles in series will stop what three miles of sky could not stop. A protector is only as effective as its connection to earth. No earth ground means no effective protection. Page 17 his NIST citation:

No earth ground means no effective protection - no matter how many scam protectors are connected in series.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Cue twilight Zone theme music...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
westom wrote:

Because of his religious blinders poor w can't figure out how plug-in suppressors work. As the IEEE guide explains for anyone that can think, it is by clamping.

w's religious mantras protect him from conflicting thoughts (aka reality).
w just repeats the same drivel, as if repetition makes it true.
Still never seen - anyone that agrees with w that plug-in suppressors are effective. (Because no one agrees with w.)
Still never answered - simple questions: - Why do the only 2 examples of protection in the IEEE guide use plug-in suppressors? - Why does the NIST guide says plug-in suppressors are "the easiest solution"? - Why does the NIST guide say "One effective solution is to have the consumer install" a multiport plug-in suppressor? - How would a service panel suppressor provide any protection in the IEEE example, pdf page 42? - Why does the IEEE guide say for distant service points "the only effective way of protecting the equipment is to use a multiport [plug-in] protector"? - Why did Martzloff say in his paper "One solution. illustrated in this paper, is the insertion of a properly designed [multiport plug-in surge suppressor]"? - Why do your "responsible manufacturers" make plug-in suppressors? - Why does "responsible" manufacturer SquareD says "electronic equipment may need additional protection by installing plug-in [suppressors] at the point of use"? - Where is a source that says protection is "inside every appliance"? - How do you protect airplanes from direct lightning strikes? Do they drag an earthing chain?
And (with some overlap): 1 - Do appliances and electronics typically have some built-in surge protection, eg MOVs? Yes or no. 2 - If the answer to 1 is yes, which we all know to be the case, then how can that surge protection work without a direct earth ground? 3 - How can aircraft be protected from surges, caused by lightning or static in the air, since they have no direct earth ground?
For real science read the IEEE and NIST guides. Both say plug-in suppressors are effective.
--
bud--

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Anybody who follows Westom's advice or believes his idiocy is a prime candidate for the Darwin Awards. Westom is a long time usenet kook who likes to sprinkle just enough truth in his nonsense to fool people into doing things that could kill them.
He has changed his usenet identity once again to try and escape from his past. He used to post as w_tom.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
westom wrote:

The best information on surges and surge protection I have seen is at: <http://www.mikeholt.com/files/PDF/LightningGuide_FINALpublishedversion_May051.pdf - "How to protect your house and its contents from lightning: IEEE guide for surge protection of equipment connected to AC power and communication circuits" published by the IEEE in 2005 (the IEEE is the major organization of electrical and electronic engineers in the US). And also: <http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/practiceguides/surgesfnl.pdf> - "NIST recommended practice guide: Surges Happen!: how to protect the appliances in your home" published by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology in 2001
The IEEE guide is aimed at those with some technical background. The NIST guide is aimed at the unwashed masses

If w had minimal ability to read and think he could read in the IEEE guide how plug-in suppressors work - clamping (limiting) the voltage on all wires (signal and power) to the common ground at the suppressor. Plug-in suppressors do not work primarily by earthing (or stopping or absorbing). The guide explains earthing occurs elsewhere. (Read the guide starting pdf page 40).

EZ Peaces appears to describe a direct lightning strike to a house. The only reliable protection is lightning rods.

w has a religious belief (immune from challenge) that surge protection must directly use earthing. Thus in his view plug-in suppressors (which are not well earthed) can not possibly work. Unfortunately for w, the IEEE guide clearly explains how plug-in suppressors work - primarily by clamping, not earthing. Because that violates w's religious belief he apparently can't read it - just like he cant read any other source that says plug-in suppressors are effective.
Because w is evangelical in his religious belief in earthing he trolls google-groups for "surge" to save the world from the evils of plug-in suppressors. He is currently is spreading his drivel in another current thread in this newsgroup and this is at least his 4th missionary stint to this newsgroup this year.

If poor w had valid technical arguments he wouldn't have to lie about others.
Never seen - anyone that agrees with w that plug-in suppressors are effective.
Never answered - any questions. Current questions from the other thread: - Why do the only 2 examples of protection in the IEEE guide use plug-in suppressors? - Why does the NIST guide says plug-in suppressors are "the easiest solution"? - Why does the NIST guide say "One effective solution is to have the consumer install" a multiport plug-in suppressor? - How would a service panel suppressor provide any protection in the IEEE example, pdf page 42? - Why does the IEEE guide say for distant service points "the only effective way of protecting the equipment is to use a multiport [plug-in] protector"? - Why did Martzloff say in his paper "One solution. illustrated in this paper, is the insertion of a properly designed [multiport plug-in surge suppressor]"? - Why do your "responsible manufacturers" make plug-in suppressors? - Why does "responsible" manufacturer SquareD says "electronic equipment may need additional protection by installing plug-in [suppressors] at the point of use"? - Where is a source that says protection is "inside every appliance"? - How do you protect airplanes from direct lightning strikes? Do they drag an earthing chain?
And (with some overlap): 1 - Do appliances and electronics typically have some built-in surge protection, eg MOVs? Yes or no. 2 - If the answer to 1 is yes, which we all know to be the case, then how can that surge protection work without a direct earth ground? 3 - How can aircraft be protected from surges, caused by lightning or static in the air, since they have no direct earth ground?
For real science read the IEEE and NIST guides. Both say plug-in suppressors are effective.
--
bud--



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lets say the first one trips, if the voltage reaches 200 volts. The second one trips if the voltage reaches 200 volts. How would that add up? I say, not at all.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OTOH,if there's enough energy to blow past the first protector,the 2nd will absorb/shunt it. The 1st protector also acts as a delay,slows down the rise of the pulse.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On May 6, 9:18 am, "Stormin Mormon"

No surge protector trips. Where is this device inside that power strip that disconnects appliance from AC mains? This 'tripping' myth is the claim that a protector will stop and absorb what even three miles of sky could not stop.
What is that 'tripping' device? You made the claim. What does this tripping?
Why is 'let-through' voltage at 330 volts? Where does 200 volts come from? What is this device inside a protector that measures and trips on voltage? Surges are measures in amperes. What measures and trips on 200 volts?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The more important question is, what are YOU tripping on?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.