surge protectors for refrig and washing machine

Any recommendation for a surge protector (strip with a cord that plugs into wall) for a refrigerator (touch control panel on door) and a touch control Samsung washing machine (as separate appliances)?
I know I asked and looked for a clothes dryer surge protector earlier and I conclude there isn't any that will plug into wall. As a result I may later do a whole house surge protector.
If it matters I can get the make/model numbers for the washing machine and refrig but meanwhile, what joules, etc.. is a good number to go by when shopping for surge protectors?
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wrote:

The whole house protector is probably the best option but I bet most fridge failures are caused by brown outs and power blinking on and off, not surges. If you are trying to restart that compressor into a head from the last blink, it will lock.
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Doug wrote:

Er, why do you want one?
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Er, why not? many new appliances have circuit boards and get blown out with high frequency. It's not you father's refrigerator these days.
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I would suggest a whole house.
You can also buy inexpensive suppressor plates that just plug into wall outlet. Some have multiple outs, just make sure it has enough amps. Probably $10-15 .
As far as quality strip suppressors, I'm partial to tripplite.
You can also do this..
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Greg
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I would not have a MOV based surge protector in my home unless it was in a METAL housing, not a PLASTIC housing.
MOVs across a power line can fail in a spectacular flame and I wouldn't count on a plastic box to contain that.
This includes plastic surge protected outlet strips.
THe MOV needs to be in metal.
Mark
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I would agree, but my whole house unit is encased in a heavy plastic container. When the first one exploded, it shot out the hole into the main box.
Greg
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On 11/3/2012 9:47 PM, Mark wrote:

UL1449 listed surge protectors made since 1998 are required to have thermal disconnects for overheating (failing) MOVs. You should only buy UL listed ones anyway. (Seems like some UPSs are not listed under UL1449.)
This is a good application for a protector at the service panel.
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On Saturday, November 3, 2012 1:05:13 PM UTC-7, Doug wrote:

I'm about to purchase a 30 AMP surge protector from Camping World (or somep lace cheaper, it's listed at just under $60.00 at Camping World)for my drye r. I have replaced the circuit board three times and was about to do a whol e house surge protector until I had the "eureka" moment: it dawned on me th at I used a 30 AMP, 3 prong surge protector cord for my trailer, which was exactly what I needed for my dryer. Plug my dryer cord into the 30 AMP surg e cord, then plug into my wall. All for under 60 bucks.
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