surge protection on washer??

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Why lightning is printed on the suppressor is strange. When I moved in here, the power company wanted to know if i wanted to continue use of meter supressor. I said no. Costs a few dollars a month. Never saw where there was on to begin with, and the former owners cheap. I have installed a supco unit in the breaker box. The first one blew out one day, bang. The power was going off and on during a storm. Replaced unit.
Like the tripplite, it has two or four inductors, in series, with caps. Movs at the end of an inductors have a better chance of working since the voltage is delayed. Noise suppression goes both ways, in or out of strip.
Whole house suppressors have trip voltages all over the place. Some are a bit too high for me. NONE will protect lightning direct hit.
Greg
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On 1/25/2014 8:16 PM, gregz wrote:

They won't reliably protect from a direct strike to the house - for that you need lightning rods.
The largest surge with any reasonable probability of occurring on power service wires is 10,000A per wire. That is based on a 100,000A lightning strike (only 5% are stronger) to the utility pole behind a house in typical urban overhead distribution. Service panel protectors with ratings much higher than 10,000A are readily available. A higher rating means the protector will have a long life. A properly installed service panel protector is likely to protect anything connected only to power wires from a very near very strong lightning strike. I would much rather have a protector at the service panel than the meter base.
A plug-in protector with high ratings, connected correctly, is likely to protect anything connected to it from a very near very strong strike. Connected correctly means all interconnected equipment is on the same protector, and all external wires - including cable/phone/... - go through the protector.
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wrote:

I would look on Tripp-Lite's webpage and see what they say.
They have a good reputation and I don't think they will lie to us.

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Thanks for the suggestion. I originally go a 404-error for their surge protector page, but eventually found some info. It's rated at 330 joules.
Regards, CG
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wrote:

That wasn't what I had in mind to look at.

The problem I see is that afaict the Tripplite page doesn't have a model ib-4. Instead, they have Isobar.... and I think the first letter I becomes the I and the first letter in bar becomes the B in IB4, and the 4 just means there are 4 receptacles (check out ISOBAR6. It has 6.), and the nearest I can tell is that this is the model in the url above: http://www.tripplite.com/sku/ISOBAR4220/ It looks like it (which often doesn't mean anything) , and it says it has line noise suprression, which http://www.tripplite.com/sku/IBAR4/ doesn't mention . http://www.tripplite.com/products/model.cfm?txtModelID doesn't mention noise either but it does include insurance, which ISOBAR4220 doesn't mention. Neither of these urls show items that look like the ISOBAR4220, either.
Looking at any of these pages, just to the right of "Home > Products > Surge Protectors > Isobar® Surge Protectors >" is a drop down list of all their Isobar surge protectors and none is as close to yours as http://www.tripplite.com/sku/ISOBAR4220/ so I'm going to assum that that is the same as the one you posted, and look at its specs.
What I was hoping you'd find was something that mentioned household appliances, Instead all it says is "Typical Applications Ideal for premium protection of personal computers with peripherals, network and CAD/CAM/CAE workstations, internetworking accessories, telecommunications systems, point of sale equipment, audio/video and home theater systems in any home, office or industrial application"
That's what the majority of buyers want it for, and not so many are worried about their washing machine yet, I think. (The other 2 models say the same thing, so the absence of appliances in Typical Applications probably doesn't mean anything.)
The other thing to concern oneself with is the output amperage, if it's enougn to power the washing machine. It says, "Circuit Breaker (amps) 9".
Does your washing machine use less than 9 amps?????????
(I have no idea what mine uses. Though fwliw I think it does have it's own breaker, I never gave that much importance, since it's only 5 feet from the breaker box and the cost of a separate circuit was pretty low in time and parts.)
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