Support for Kneewall


I built a 6' long x 42" high kneewall between my Diningroom & Kitchen. But if i push on the end of the wall it moves a little. I want to put a Column at the end for support,but don't know how to attach it to the ceiling & not see brackets. Any suggestion's appreciated.
--
Dell Inspiron
Pentium dual-core 2.2 GHz
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is there a joist where your column is to attach? If so, perhaps you can use pocket screws to attach the column. If not, you're going to have to add something to attach it to. Sheetrock isn't going to do it. In any case, I don't think you need "brackets".

You need to add a <space> and <return> to make the above a proper sig- separator.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
keith wrote:

Don't go up, go down. Think like a stairway newel post. Assuming you have access to the ceiling below, plate across 2-3 joists, and run a stiffener up through the floor. Old stairways were all wood, and went together like a chinese block puzzle. In this case, a metal plate lagged into the joists, with a welded pipe with flanges to bolt off to the studs of the knee wall. You'll have to open up the wall to attach it, but when it place it would vanish completely. Any competent welding shop that makes basement columns to order can whip it up for you.
Whoever built the place should have framed a socket in the floor, and run a doubled 2x4 end stud down into it, the full depth of the floor joists. You could also do it that way, if the idea of ironmongery is not appealing to you.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I added a knee wall in a previous house I too had trouble getting the free end stiff enough, until I tied it into the (open) railing around the side.

He just added the wall, so I doubt anyone thought far enough ahead to add the "socket".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Unless you extend the column material down into the kneewall some you are just going to create another wobble point.
Have you put sheetrock on it? If not that might be enough to tighten it.
I would run something down from the inside of the kneewall into the space below. Then fast it to the nearest floor joist or tie it to 2 joist using a cross piece.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
desgnr wrote:

1. Box in the top end with a molding or moldings wide enough to be nailed/screwed to wood above the ceiling.
2. Are there base cabinets on the kitchen side? Attach to them.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/12/2010 8:43 AM, desgnr wrote:

go through the ceiling, tie into ceiling joists, then wrap with sheetrock
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We put a kneewall in our dedroom, about 4 ft high by 10 ft long. It is stabilized by two 90 degree end sections about a foot long. Very solid.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you have access to the underside of the flooring, consider glue/screw a 4X4 to span between the joists below the end of the knee wall above. Once in place, then drill upward into the end piece of the knee wall and reinforce it with a long lag bolt driven upward through the 4X4 into the framing. If you have lived a good, clean and honest life, you might even find the end framing member of the knee wall passes OVER a floor joist, making life even more simple.
Nonny
--
On most days,
its just not worth
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

To give an educated answer we need a little more info.
Is this a ranch house where you can get to the attic above the post position?
Does there happen to be a joist directly over the post position?
Either of those will make this fairly easy.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit http://www.househomerepair.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
desgnr wrote:

I made a very sturdy one by first lifting part of the floor and putting a vertical 2x6 glued and screwed to the floor joist at the loose end of the knee wall, also adding blocking to transfer the horizontal force to the adjoining joists on each side. I would have had to change it a lot to have more joints like that but the other end of the knee wall was going into a normal wall anyway. I put the sill plate down also by gluing and screwing it down into the double joists below the floor. (double because it was around the opening for stairs) Then built the kneewall using glue and screws. Now many people underestimate the strength drywall can add, but it can add quite a lot. Before the drywall the knee wall was fairly stiff. After installing the drywall with GLUE and screws the wall became even stronger than I had hoped for. For the drywall to add that much strength, the sill plate must be down strong as all hell and the bottom of the drywall glued to it. I think I had a few lag bolts with washers in the sill plate also but the glue is also very important.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The kneewall is below a Archway that i assume there is a header above i can attach to. There is no joist below,they run Parellel to the kneewall.
---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Would it help to put an angle iron between the stud at the free end & floor plate ???????????????????
---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

None of that is going to stiffen it much. You are fighting considerable leverage at the top corner of the kneewall. Your best bet is to extend a 2x4 through the floor and then attach it to the bottom of the floor joists. It doesn't matter which way they run you can always scab some short pieces to connect the vertical 2x4 to one or more joists. Then you have leverage working for you from the other side. You might stiffen it a bit with these other solutions but if it gets subjected to a lot of force, like someone tripping and using it to break their fall, it will rip out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
desgnr wrote:

Is the kneewall still open or covered with drywall or whatever?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In that case just take a piece of wood the same size as the floor joist, and in the joist bay below the end of the knee wall put a cross piece in between two floor joists, then cut a hole in the floor for the end post to go through (I would probably use a 4x4 assuming that you framed the knee wall with 2x4) and bolt that to the piece you just put in.
nate

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.