Sump pumps -- GFCI required?

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I have a sump pump in an unfinished basement. It is on a dedicated 15-amp 120-volt circuit, the outlet/receptacle is on the ceiling, and it is a duplex GFCI receptacle.
The sump pump failed because the GFCI receptacle tripped, and the basement flooded.
Are sump pumps required to have a GFCI receptacle according the National Electrical Code (NEC) even if the receptacle is on the ceiling about 7 1/2 feet from the floor?
Could I change the receptacle from a duplex GFCI receptacle to a single receptacle that is not GFCI, and still be in compliance with the NEC?
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For whats its worth during selling home 2 seperate home inspectors wqrote up my sump pump:(
first for no GFCI.......... sale fell thru........
\but I installed GFCI, second home inspector wrote it up saying you should never GFCI a sump pump. second buyer bought home anyway......
I beleve a single non GFCI outlet is proper
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Home inspectors are not by any stretch, electrical inspectors. If you had five different ones, you'd probably get five different opinions. Typically, electrical wiring is inspected and certified, when installed, and grandfathered until such a time when changes are made to it, otherwise, virtually all the wiring in a home that isn't 90 degree, would have to be replaced. If the outlet that you plug your pump into was installed before GFCI protection was required, there is most likely no legal reason why you should have to replace it.
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Thanks. I may end up going with the first option, "Cheat, and replace the GFCI with a standard outlet", since having a sump pump that trips the GFCI when in use doesn't make sense.
I guess I could do the second option of cutting the plug off and hard wiring it. But, I would have to figure out how to do that because the sump pump I have has a plug with two cords going into it -- I assume one is power to the pump and the other is from the float switch. If I did that approach, would I have to have a shut-off switch added to the circuit, or would the dedicated sump pump circuit breaker be sufficient to serve as the shut-off?
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RBM wrote:

Good, the main panel is less than 30 feet away and in direct sight of the sump pump. The dedicated sump pump circuit breaker is very clearly marked and is at the bottom of the panel away from the other circuit breakers. So, I assume that would serve as the disconnect. I would rather do that than have another switch somewhere that someone could accidentally turn off or turn off intentionally and forget to turn it back on.
I would still have to figure out how the wiring in the sump pump plug is set up. It's a molded plug and two cords go into it -- one from the back and one from the side. I am guessing that the cord that ges into the side of the plug is a switch loop coming up from the float, but I don't know. I would have to figure that out if I decided to cut the plug off and hard wire the sump pump.
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wrote in message

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Just make sure that the GFCI doesn't feed other outlets downstream. If it does and you eliminate it from the sump pump outlet, make sure to re-install it in the next downstream outlet.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Thanks. The sump pump is on its own circuit and nothing else is on that circuit -- no sitches, no outlets, etc.
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Jay-T wrote:

Unless it is a dedicated SINGLE outlet. Sump pumps CAN'T be on GFCI's.
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The NEC no longer has any exceptions
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No, just 125 volt. Not a bad idea. The OP can rewire the circuit for 240 volt, change the outlet, and pump, and he's off to the races
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RBM wrote:

Thanks. I did read something about that on an old forum when I did an Internet search prior to my original post. I guess the concept is that the purpose of the GFCI's in unfinished basements is to prevent ordinary users from a shock hazard if they unplug an appliance or device (including a sump pump) and use the receptacle for another purpose. And, I guess they assume that would not apply for a 220-volt receptacle.
Although that means I could change the whole circuit wiring to 220 volts, and get a new 220-volt sump pump, I don't plan on doing that. One reason is that if somehow the 220-volt is safe enough according to NEC for the actual use of the sump pump (without unplugging it and plugging something else in), then that would be no more safe than me just changing the 110-volt GFCI outlet to a non-GFCI outlet (as long as no one unplugs that and plugs something else in).
So, I guess I'll either cheat and change the existing GFCI to a non-GFCI outlet, or I'll hard wire it since it is less than 30 feet away from, and in direct line of sight with, the main panel circuit breaker for the sump pump.
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wrote in message

I agree.
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In wrote in message

Good point; thanks.
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*The latest code edition now requires that all unfinished basement receptacles as well as all garage receptacles regardless of their location be GFI protected. This apparently was changed because people will plug things in no matter where the receptacle is and what it is for. I have seen plenty of extension cords hanging from garage ceilings to agree with the requirement that garage door opener receptacles be GFI protected.
Unfortunately that does present a problem as you found out the hard way. I suggest that you write to the NFPA about your personal experience in this case.
My thought is that there should be another type of receptacle for the sump pump such as a twist lock without GFI protection. That would make the receptacle unavailable for general use and keep it for sump pump use only and thus eliminate the potential damage from nuisance tripping. If GFI protection is required for the pump, an equipment GFI can be installed along with the twist lock receptacle. An equipment GFI does not have the same low threshold for tripping as the one used for people protection and consequently is less prone to nuisance tripping.
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2008 NEC, yes -- which IMHO is completely insane. 2005 and earlier NEC, no.

Won't matter.

Yes, but note that it also says "for purposes of this section, unfinished basements are defined as portions or areas of the basement not intended as habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and the like." [2008 NEC, Article 210.8(A)(5)]
So put a TV, easy chair, and your beer fridge within a yard or two of the sump pit, and you've turned that "portion or area of the basement" into a "habitable room" -- which means that "for purposes of this section" it's no longer "unfinished" and therefore *not* required to have a GFCI.
There's another workaround: the GFCI requirement applies only to "125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles." So install a 30-amp circuit and receptacle, and change the plug on the sump pump.
Note also that the *2005* NEC contains the same language, and additionally two pertinent exceptions to the GFCI requirement that were removed in the 2008 Code: "Receptacles that are not readily accessible" and "Receptacles located within dedicated space for each appliance that, in normal use, is not easily moved from one place to another and that is cord-and-plug connected..."
So if the governing authority in the OP's jurisdiction is the 2005 (or earlier) Code and not 2008, he apparently has no worries.
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