Sump Pumps And Carbon Monoxide

Isn't it true that combustion is necessary to produce CO?
A sump-system with battery backup was installed 24 hours ago. Today the CO monitor sounded. Fire Dept. found the highest reading (256 ppm) in the room with the sump, but don't have a clue. They advised to open the windows to drop levels, then close them to see if they rise.
That's where we stand. Any clues? Can a sump system produce CO?
Jack
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BroJack wrote:

There are a number of possibilities.
While CO is normally produced by incomplete combustion where there is insufficient oxygen. As I recall it is lighter than air so it would not tend to collect in a basement. You should check any combustion device close by or not so close. They would be the most likely source.
CO can also be produced by "slow combustion" That is rotting. Organic material that is slowly rotting can produce CO as well as other things. This can form pockets under the earth and that may be the source.
I would not rule out this organic source. BTW while it is rare that it is found in quantity, it has caused deaths, and in a few cases many. It is so rare and because it goes away, it is often missed when it does occur. It could be coming in through the sump.
Keep that CO monitor in service and don't ignore it.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
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Never hear of that. Just a thought, did the guy doing the installation fart a lot?
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you got a dead body buried in your basement BroJack? Close the windows tightly take a few relaxants and breath deeply.
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BroJack wrote:

Disconnect the battery charger. If the alarm stops (after a day), the battery is producing Hydrogen and Oxygen (normal) which is fooling the sensor. I'm assuming a lead-acid battery.
Jim
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Just got off the horn with the installer who said that the batteries are overcharging and producing H2 and fooling the sensor, just as you and others have said.
Scheduled to repair Sep. 1. Now if only the electricity doesn't go out or there is enough charge in the battery to work if it does go out. They drilled all sorts of extra weep holes which are going to allow extra rainwater into the ditch.
Thanks to all who have responded. You guys are amazin'.
Jack
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Oops. I think that oxygen is 16 and carbon is 12.
Told ya I flunked chem. ;-)
Jack ______________________

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wrote:

Yes, CO is lighter than air, but only very slightly so: 1.25 grams/liter for CO versus 1.29 for air.
The atomic mass of carbon is 12, and the atomic mass of oxygen is 16 -- thus the molecular mass of CO is 28, same as nitrogen N2.

N2 is about 79% of the atmosphere, O2 slightly less than 21%, and the bulk of the tiny fraction remaining is argon.

No sh*t?
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Ck battery voltage, and charger voltage get specs from manufacturer , you will kill the battery if voltage is kept up, disconect charger. If you can return the system look into Basepump, or Zoeller Water main powered pumps if you have City water, they outperform battery pumps.
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On Tue, 17 Aug 2004 21:38:13 -0230, Terry wrote:

When CO binds with your blood's hemoglobin it prevents O(2) from binding to it, starving you of oxygen. It's very good at it.
http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/webpages/askasci/gen01/gen01053.htm
Regards, Scott
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On Tue, 17 Aug 2004 19:16:01 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@home.net (BroJack) wrote:

Concentrations of H2 or H2S can set off and give false CO readings on a electronic and/or portable CO detector. (Most of them can't tell the difference.)
http://www.raesystems.com/~raedocs/App_Tech_Notes/App_Notes/AP-222_CO_Detection_for_Engine_Companies.pdf
see "CO in Food Warehouse"
"The warehouse personal pointed out that we were making the CO measurement in an office located within the battery charging room".
"Lead-acid batteries generate hydrogen gas while charging. Using a cross-sensitivity table supplied by the CO sensor manufacturer showed that 80ppm on the CO sensor means that there was approximately 200ppm of hydrogen present, which is well below its lower explosive limit (LEL) of 4%(40,000ppm)."
I.E. Your new pump system may be overcharging the battery.
Let it settle down after the initial charge.
If it keeps on setting off the CO detector.. You might want to put the charging circuit on a simple AC timer($10). Charging the battery for couple hours each day should keep it topped off.
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Can you recommend a H2 detector for the home? The only ones I could find on the web had relay features to hook up with an exhaust system. I just want a home monitor that sounds an alarm. Don't trust the waterproofing company when they say that the charger has been fixed.
Jack
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On Wed, 18 Aug 2004 22:06:48 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@windswept.net (Bro Jack) wrote:

Hmmm. you need it on the cheap... Sounds like your existing CO detector is doing a fine job detecting the H2 offgasing. I suspect it went off @500ppm or less.
Problem is that any device with a readout is going to cost in excess of $100.. I.E. Something used for mine/factor safety,,, http://www.enmet.com/spectrum.html A sensor with a current loop output is still going to cost you.. http://www.airtest.ca/docs/gas/tr3200.pdf TR3200-DC-H2-HYT..
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On Wed, 18 Aug 2004 23:11:40 -0400, Tim Keating

My sensor, 3 rooms away from the batteries, triggered at 75. The Fire Dept's sensor in the room where the batteries are located read 256 which, using the formula you provided, translates to 640 ppm H2.
Thanks again, Jack
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