Sump Pump w/o Tile Connection?

I have a basement that floods in one corner after heavy, extended rain (every 2-3 years). Current theory is hydrostatic pressure pushing water (vapor?) through concrete.
Will a sump pump help?
The weeping tiles in this development are notorious for being inadequate, so I'm not sure if busting through the floor/walls to make a connection is worth it. Is it worthwhile to install just the pit and pump without connections to the weeping tiles?
All the usual measures (eaves, grading, etc) have been taken. Lots of concrete/asphalt around the perimeter of the house makes excavation unappealing.
TIA.
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I doubt a sump pump by itself will do more than provide a place for the water that makes it onto the floor to go. It might help marginally.
You could try it and if it does not work by itself, then cut the concrete 18" back from the wall around the perimeter, break it out and install a drainage system with leading to the new sump pit.
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Sorry computer problems for a day or two.
Still doing demo, but pictures of inside are here: http://www.dropbox.com/gallery/20192720/1/BasementWater?h=492572
Outside is concrete patio extending 10+ feet in all directions.
Once the inside finishes are out, I'll get some shots of the bare concrete.
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WandererFan wrote:

It's hard to say for sure, but it looks to me like it may be possible to just put in a sump pump in the corner or area where the problem is and that might work. I have something similar in the basement of a house that I own and I think it is the water table rising every once in a while, especially after a lot of rain. I had a sump pump pit put in, with stone around the pit of course, and put holes in the side of the pit. I didn't break out the floor along the walls or anything like that -- just a sump pump in the corner. It worked for me. When the water table rises, the water comes into the sump pump pit through the sides and the pump pumps it out. That solved the problem. My thinking was that I would start with just the sump pump pit and see if that worked. If that didn't work, I figured I could always go to the next step of breaking out the floor along the walls and running drain lines under the floor over to the sump pump pit that I already put in. But, I ended up not needing to do that -- just the sump pump pit by itself worked.
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On Wed, 10 Aug 2011 09:12:22 -0700 (PDT), WandererFan

Really hard to tell what's going on from the pics. It's possible you have a crack in the floor or foundation that's the source of the water. Once you have all visible you should wait to see exactly where the water is entering. Then it's quite possible you can get that sealed by a pro and don't even worry about a sump pit. I had a 3-4 foundation cracks sealed by U.S. Waterproofing. Some kind of epoxy they inject. Cost about $250 a crack. I don't look at that as DIY but you and others might. You could hardly see the cracks when dry, but they let enough water in form puddles during heavy rains. My working sump pump didn't stop that.
--Vic
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That's the plan. Leave everything bare concrete until we get a big rain or until SWMBO's patience runs out.
I had 2 cracks sealed with epoxy last flood. Can't see any evidence of water getting in through them.
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On 8/8/2011 2:24 PM, WandererFan wrote:

My first house would get water in one corner after a long heavy rain. Wife called a waterproofing company and guy came out, said the water table was causing problem, wanted $1000's to put in a french drain. House was on top of a mountain, and the highest point in miles. Told him he was full of sh*t, and threw the turkey out of my house. Drilled holes in block walls and entire wall was filled with water, but only leaked in a few places.
Told my brother-in-law, a builder and he said 99% chance it was downspouts leaking. He said put a hose in downspout when dry, let water run for 1 1/2 hour, NO LESS unless it leaks sooner. EXACTLY 1 1/2 hour it started to leak. Turned out the downspout went into terracotta pipe that connected downspout on other side of house, and that was broken, about a foot or two under ground. I ran a new PVC drain and problem was gone. BIL told me most basement leakage comes from this sort of problem.
The first thing you need to do is find out why there is water around your house. Basements are not swimming pools, and it's difficult/impossible to keep water out if it gets to the walls. If it's a water table, or you live on a spring or something, you might need a french drain/sump pump. About all other conditions you want to remove the cause if possible, and most of the time it is coming from the roof to your basement. It needs to be redirected to someone else's basement:-)
--
Jack
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been there done all this:(
just go with the interior french drain system with sump pump or better a drain to daylight.......
because although just a sump pump may work today one day a gully washer might come along and flood your basement/ this is espically tue if your finishing your basement...
been there spent 8 grand on exterior work......
all new downspout drains , exterior french drain, sealed basement walls newsidewalks and steps. I was the laborer. sealed basement walls and floor cracks, completely regraded lawn. the job took much of the summer. hard grueling work.
that winter the basement flooded anyway./ you cant seal out water just redirect it. and cracks can move again, so crack sealing is nbo guarantee of anything other than having spent money:(
broke down and had interior french drain installed which fixed the problem.......... for a fraction of the cost of my doing the exterior work.......
yard looked great it gave the home curb appeal.......
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