Sump pump questions

We bought a house in New England last summer, and all was going well until this weekend, when the massive snow melt and rain combined to flood our basement with about four inches of water. There is a sump pump in the corner that wasn't hooked up, but I can't seem to find a drain for it *anywhere*. If a sump pump was installed, shouldn't there also have been a drain somewhere? Or is that not always so? The tubing was just coiled up and hanging above the pump, and I spoke to the previous owner last night, and he said in the three years they were here, they never used it (this winter was the worst in years with the snow).
I attached three more tubes (for 100') and ran it out a window and about 20 feet behind my house, where it slopes slightly away from the house. But the sump hole is continuing to fill up (and water is also seeping up a bit from cracks elsewhere in the basement floor), so it would be nice if I could find a drain! Is there anything I might be missing that I'm not looking for?
Thanks for any tips...
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um.. is the pump running and the water is still rising?
Mark
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For quickest pumping now you want the shortest length hose and shortest rise. 1 ft less rise will make a dramatic difference in gpm. Look for a hole drilled through the house and caped off, Or perhaps it just was never finished.
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You are doing the right thing. It's just that you may need an additional pump or a bigger more powerful pump for this 100 year flood if it can't keep up. And you need to leave it running if you are shutting it down.
I'd agree with the above reply that you need to keep the hoses as short as possible and reduce the height the water must go in exiting your basement. By doing that you will increase the volume of water that the pump produces.
Code usually prevents dumping sumps into the waste line sewer.
JimL
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Maybe it was never permanently installed. My pump has a PVC pipe going straight up, along the basement ceiling and then down and out. Sounds like you have a sump hole and an emergency submersion pump.

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It seems as though the sump pump was put in because there is no basement drain.
It may be illegal to dump rainwater (sump water) into a domestic sewer drain. Domestic waste may go to a water treatment plant while street drains (rain water) often gets dumped directly into a river/bay. Too much rain water going into the waste treament plant overloads its capacity - hence may be forbidden.
The solution you devised may be the ideal one.
John wrote:

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Yes, I've completely emptied the basement about three times now. Each time, the water continues to rise and flood.

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That seems to make sense. After all, the main drainage PVC pipe is directly above the sump hole, so it seems to me that they could have connected the pump right to it easily enough (if that's how a drain could be connected).
When searching (frantically) for a drain, I did discover an old pipe (about 1.5 inches in diameter) coming up through the concrete in another part of the basement. It's cut off and open, and I stuck my finger in it and felt water in that, too.
On Mon, 04 Apr 2005 17:48:54 GMT, Bennett Price

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In all probability you have a water table problem. Other than installing special drains you're going to have to live with the water seepage into the basement and using your sump pump. The pump should be effective in maintaining some level of control of the water that seeps in. If it wasn't for the pump the water level in the basement would be much worse MLD
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A second sump hole and pump at the other end of the basement would help, too.
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Thanks for your input (and thanks to everyone else, too). Regarding the pump, it's doing a good job of expelling the water, even along my 100 feet of patchwork tubing (and up and out a window). Unfortunately, the float switch isn't working properly -- it'll shut off, but won't turn back on. This is why I keep need to turn it off after it expels the new water, because I'm bypassing the switch.
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John wrote:

on the pump again until there is quite a bit of water in the pit. If you haven't, try leaving the pump on (but not operating because of the water level switch) until the pit is nearly full, and see if it will restart itself then.
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If the float doesn't work, go and buy a new sump pump. It should never ben turned off at the socket. And the last 2 houses I had both expelled the water out of a pipe in the basement wall and down towards a roadway.
Home depot sells sump pumps. I'm in the process of adding a second one ot my basement now, and will route it out of the wall and down the road.
Dean
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