Sump Pump Question


I need to install a sump pump in my crawl space to get rid of water if and when. My need has magnified this year because of the large amount of snow melt and unusually high rain fall in this Delaware area.
I am lead to believe that I can make a pit in a low spot in order to draw in the water and then use a sump pump to direct the water outside. I plan to try to use a pre-fab plastic pit liner if I can find one. I plan to add holes in the bottom of the liner if not already there, and then use a submersible sump pump inside the liner surrounded by crushed stone.
I want the thing to be automatic, so I don't have to mess with it. IE run when there's water - not run (off) otherwise. I notice many pumps use an outside-the-pump float mechanism to provide the automatic ness. I don't want that. I would like the pump to have an automatic switch internal in the pump. I see pumps advertised as automatic, but I want to be sure they work that way. Do they? I guess I could buy one at Lowes and try it.
Duke
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On Mar 24, 7:53 am, snipped-for-privacy@eldorado.com wrote:

Those external float switches work pretty well, and at least if it fails you can get at it without taking the whole thing apart. I'd get one with semi- trash pump capability, all the junk in the area will migrate to your sump. You can help that situation by making the sump deeper, that will let some of the debris settle when the pump is off.
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On Wed, 24 Mar 2010 06:13:23 -0700 (PDT), Eric in North TX

A sump pump with semi- trash pump capability? Boy that's a new one on me. I'm heading to Lowes now.
Duke
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On Mar 24, 9:27 am, snipped-for-privacy@eldorado.com wrote:

Regarding the liner or sump basin, they have them at Lowes or HD in the section with sump pumps or where they have 4" drainage pipe and similar solutions. I would not "surround" the sump pump with crushed stone. In this application, I don't think I'd use stone at all. I'd place the pump on top of some concrete pavers or similar that will support it and leave 12" at the bottom. With water running into the pit from a dirt surface, over time you will get dirt, sand, etc in the bottom of the pit. If you have crushed stone down there, you have a real mess. Without it, you could remove the sump pump and scoop out the material.
I would think it matters little whether you have a pump with an external float.
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On Mar 24, 8:27 am, snipped-for-privacy@eldorado.com wrote:

I have this one http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/search.shtml?searchQuery=3yu69&op=search&Ntt=3yu69&N=0&sst=subset 1/8" solid solid handling isn't much, but it beats liquid only
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On Mar 24, 7:53 am, snipped-for-privacy@eldorado.com wrote:

Actually, it sounds like you have it figured out. Don't mess with pedestal-type pumps. Go with a good submersible in the 3/4 - 1 hp range. We have had both the external and electronic switching and both work well. Our particular pump is Basement Watchdog but there are a lot of other good pumps like Grainger. the pump is the heart of everything so a little more investment in power will be good. The plastic sumps are available in most big-box stores or lumber yards. In fact, our son retrofitted his basement using a large Rubbermaid storage tub because he wanted plenty of room to install a good backup pump. The plumbing is straight-forward PVC but make sure everything from foundation-out has a slight slant to keep water from standing in the pipe outside. If you have much of a rise from pump to foundation exit, a backflow valve is good too.
Put the sump in a low spot, and if necessary cut rough channels to the sump.
RonB
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Little Giant has several complete packages that include the back water valve, pit box, alarm and switch. I've installed several of these. Don't put gravel inside the box, this only complicates monitoring and replacement:
http://www.lgpc.com/Product/ItemDetail.aspx?ProductID 10
check other listings for vertical head, deeper pits, greater horsepower.
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one more thing,, if you really need a sump pump to keep the water at bay, then buy 2 and keep one ready as a backup...
also figure out what you are going to do when the power goes out..
get a big UPS or a small generator
Mark
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wrote:

Well, I have thought it out and have bought a Water Ace R33SP 1/3hp unit at Lowes - the price was right. Right or wrong, I decided I really did not need a unit as strong as a 1/2hp. My decision was based on the fact that I have only got water in my crawl space once in 11 years, and so may never see it again in my life time because I am already 79 and rather feeble. This February I got hit with 4 feet of snow in a double blizzard, followed by large scale melting made worse by torrential rain storms. Further, I don't have 20A service there. Lastly, I figure I only had 3 or so inches of water which collected very slowly and so should be quick and easy to dispose of. I figure a strong pump would come on and off repeatedly because of the slow encroachment of water, and I fear that would be hard on a 1/2 hp pump. That's my thinking anyway.
That said, I bought a 18" wide plastic planter to line the sump pit which probably will be some 18" deep, and in the lowest spot I can find.
I plan to cut some holes in the side of the planter, but it already has the usual 1" holes in the bottom. I wonder.......How many and what size holes should I make in the side. Should I enlarge or increase the number of the holes in the bottom? Should I cover the planter?
I plan to connect PVC to the pump to convey the effluent at least 50 feet and maybe 200 feet (in order to reach the roadside ditch).
My last wonderment is how should I place the pump in the planter? Flat on the bottom, or on four 2" X 8" bricklets I bought at Lowes to raise the pump. My soil is semi-sandy by the way (here in Delaware).
Be nice
and Thanks
Duke.
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You are on the right track. Cut slots, many slots not more than an inch wide all around the bottom of the crock. Overdig the diameter of your crock's hole, set it in and fill the area surrounding the entire crock with 57's limestone (plain driveway gravel, not pea sized gravel). This will serve to filter out the gunk before it gets to your pump. Set the pump in the crock. Don't set it up on anything, and don't put any gravel or anything else inside the crock, except your pump. Keep in mind, you may not need to dig the crock it's full 24" - 36" depth, whatever it may be, as long as you cut those slots in the bottom, but you do need to dig it deep enough to keep the pump submerged, because they are indeed cooled by the water they drain. Most automatics take care of that issue themselves with the factory float settings. I'd suggest a heavier unit with a cast iron body, such as the Zoeller M-53. I'm still paying under $100 for them and they outlast most everyones all plastic cheapies from the big box stores that cost $15-$30 more.
Good Luck, Lefty
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On Wed, 24 Mar 2010 15:50:02 -0400, "Lefty"
.

Thanks Lefty.
Duke
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On Wed, 24 Mar 2010 15:50:02 -0400, "Lefty"
.

I was thinking of using a garden hose for discharge. Is this appropriate?
Thanks
Duke
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On Mar 24, 6:27 pm, snipped-for-privacy@eldorado.com wrote:

Depends on how much water you move but solid PVC is more appropriate. It is cheap, easy to install and when you are finished, your are finished. Don't have to worry about the hose aging
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whatever hose you use, remember it will get heavy when it fills w/ water and the pressure will make it try to flex, you may need to fasten it to something solid every few feet...
also its a good idea to run the pump for a few seconds at least once per month so that the bearings do not seize...
the external float switches are good, as long as you leave enough room in the pit for them to swing up and down..
Mark
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No, too small and it will restrict the flow. What is the outlet size on the pump? You don't want to go more than one pipe size below that. Use PVC or a large diameter hose. .
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On Wed, 24 Mar 2010 22:51:52 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski"

Yah - I could have guessed something like that. The pump I was considering at Lowes yesterday had a hose fitting on it. They were out of it naturally. It was a Utilite 1/3 HP.
I guess the one recommended here was bigger? I can see the point of long-term wear and flow restriction.
Thanks guys.
Duke
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On Mar 25, 5:17 am, snipped-for-privacy@eldorado.com wrote:

If you want flexible, there is flexible PVC available, 1 1/2 or 2". Pool parts supply houses have it as it's used for pool installs. It gets connected using standard PVC fittings and glue.

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You've had lots of good suggestions.
I'll add only one. You need to know about where *everything* (sewer, drain pipes etc) is located under the floor before you dig the sump pit. For obvious reasons. Expect to run into most anything (rebar, old construction garbage/filler, etc) as you dig.
P
On Wed, 24 Mar 2010 08:53:14 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@eldorado.com wrote:

"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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On Mar 24, 9:53 am, snipped-for-privacy@eldorado.com wrote:

We have lined a sump pit using a 'milk crate'; after cutting a hole in the concrete basement floor the crate was sunk into the ground below, water draining into it from the weeping tile around the footings. The pump sits in the sump and operates when its built in float switch demands. A typical crate is about one foot square and about one foot deep and holds nine containers of milk. If more depth needed use two crates cutting the bottom out of the upper one and wire them together before lowering into the pit.
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On Thu, 25 Mar 2010 22:18:17 -0700 (PDT), terry
.

All good ideas and points
Thanks
Duke
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