sump pipe height?

Hello All,
After the check valve, the sump drain pipe goes up about 2', then 90deg elbow straight across the room and into a waste pipe. So the sump drain pipe is right in the middle of the wall.
What I want to do is have the pipe go up straight 7' (to just below the joists) before elbowing towards the waste pipe. Is this too high for the sump to pump a column of water?
Thanks, -KJ
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Well, its not too high, but you will reduce your capacity to maybe a quarter of what it was at 2' and put more wear on the pump. Unless you have an extremely good reason for it and the pump rarely cycles, it is a very bad idea.
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I do need to check up on the pump, because I have actually never heard it cycle. Our basement is very dry, and, our house is on sandy soil (the development is on former pine barrens), so I expect drainage to be very good.
Either way, I am going to have a good look at it to make sure it is working, and what model it is, etc. We have never had water in the basement, so I guess we're lucky. I'll post back when I've done a little more investigating. Thanks.
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I'd also check on local codes, as in most areas, sump pumps are not permitted to drain into a municipal sewer system.
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How would I do that (which office to call?) - building inspector's?
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"How would I do that (which office to call?) - building inspector's"
Yes, the building inspector can tell you whether discharging into the sewer system is permitted or not. Most places it isn't as it creates more sewer water that has to go through the processing facitlity, thereby requiring a bigger facitlity, more operating expense, etc.
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On 27 Dec 2005 14:08:24 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

My 2-door away neighbor did that, and now when the rain fills the stream and the stream overflows and fills the sewer, and the sewer backs up into the sink, and the sink overflows, and that water runs to the sump, his sump pump puts the water back into the sink again. Which is full.
We only have this sort of flood every couple years or so, so even though I've pointed out what will happen, he hasn't done anything yet, I think.
He's a couple inches higher than I am, but still one of the 4 houses with this problem.
BTW OP, are you in NJ?
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It will have a reduced Head, pumping ability the higher it goes. www.zoeller.com should have a list of gpm and hp rating sheets correspondoing to each pump sold. If your pump runs often now it will take longer if you raise it but should be in the pumps ability if it is a decent pump. If its overloaded now you will have problems.
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Check the specifications on the pump. Most can take 7', but it will have lower flow; that will not matter in most cases for some seepage. We use them at work to go 19', but that is in the design.
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My situation was worse than the other examples. Mine goes up 7 feet, but rarely ran, sometimes not for months. Yet, when for the first time in 22 years, I had 7 inches of rain within 48 or maybe 30 hours, the pump was running full blast and loads of water was coming out of it, but it still couldn't keep up with the water coming into the sump from the soil outside, through the corrugated, perforated black plastic pipe that surrounds my house underground.
I don't know how much more output there would have been if I only had to raise the water 5 feet less, But I'm saying that required capacity can vary from nothing for months at a time, to beyond the level of my pump.

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wrote:

Interesting. My sump pump doesn't work (I drained my water heater into it and it just sat there, the water draining out of the crock naturally), probably from sitting there for 23 years without ever cycling. I was thinking of simply covering it over to gain a little more floor space. Maybe I should fix it instead? My backyard is a fairly steep slope down, so I figure any water has someplace better to go than into my sump.
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Did the float go up high enough to flip the swtich on the pump? Etc.

Are you sure it never ccycled. Maybe it just broke recently.

Well, whatever cover you use, make it removeable and restorable, if your area is like mine, where sump pumps are required in below-grade basements (but not where one end of the basement is above grade.)
My sump came with a thick plastic cover that has a U cut out of it to allow the pipe and the float rod to fit in it. I havent' nerve enough to step on it, but I do occasionally put things across it.
And I've used it as a stencil for a couple neighbors who didn't have a cover at all. (I wonder who threw away their covers, and why.)
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