Sump basin leaking

I just moved into a new home in Southeast WI, the sump pump has been running about every 15 minutes. Net summary - after troubleshooting, found out that at the bottom of the sump basin, there are two holes that have been drilled out approximately 1/4" in diameter that are filling the sump basin.
Does anyone have any suggestions on how to either A) fill/patch the holes in the bottom of the pit or B) replace the sump basin?
The water flows in quite vigorously when the it gets to the bottom of the sump basin, so a simple silicone sealant/caulking doesn't seem like it would stay in place long enough to dry. And I'm not sure how to go about replacing the sump basin (especially if there is an easier, yet effective, option).
Any thoughts? Thanks!
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Unless this is a sink basin or sewage ejector basin, I would expect ground water is what it's there to remove, and if so, and you plug the water entry holes, eventually the water may rise to a level above the floor

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Exactly. The purpose of the sump pump is to remove ground water to keep the level below that of the basement floor. The water has to get into the sump basin to be pumped out. Often there is a drain system around the basement perimeter, under the floor that brings water to the sump pit. In any case, the whole purpose of the pit is to let water in, so it can be pumped out. When the groundwater level drops enough, the pit will no longer fill up enough to turn on the pump.
Make sure the discharge is going 10+ ft from the house. And there should be a check valve in the line to prevent water left in the line from siphoning back when the pump shuts off. You could also adjust the float switch so that the water level is a bit higher before it turns on, but it's better to have it set a bit too low and have a dry basement.

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On Sat, 11 Aug 2007 09:37:54 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

This is a standard sump application with sump basin sunk into basement floor (and possibly connected to drain tiles)? If so ...
The little holes in the bottom (same as I drilled in mine) are to allow the residual water to drain after the water table has lowered (so it doesn't become fetid, etc).

The object of the sump system is to trap/evacuate water as the water table under the house rises to meet the bottom of the basement floor. You -want- to allow water into the sump basin, not shut it out.
Suggest you review sump system operation, etc, confirm that pump is evacuating water properly. Then figger out why there's so much water to pump. Perhaps you need exterior grading away from foundation or somesuch.
P
"Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens!" -Friedrich Schiller
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Please tell me you are trolling!
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Allrighty gang - here's what I've deduced/tried out thus far:
The foundation does appear to have a drain tile present with two corrugated plastic pipes feeding into the sump basin - it's my understanding that the only water that I should expect to see feeding into the basin should be from these drain tiles as the sump basin is the low spot in the drain tile setup and not from underneath the sump basin (where I am currently seeing a large waterflow/influx). The only other potential is that the two corrugated infeed pipes are coming only from the basement window wells as an overflow versus being present for a drain tile as I was told during the buying process.
The biggest "question" I have is that my neighbors are not seeing anywhere near the pumping that I am (up to 5+ times / hour), where they will have almost nothing.
The water table seems to equalize at around 10.5" in depth (still below my "drain tile" hoses), but high enough to fill the basin. If I pump it out, it simply gushes back in with great force from the holes in the ground.
Some other thoughts:

It is discharging plenty far away from the house and the pump does have a check valve installed (and correctly).

We are looking to improve the grading to keep water going away from the house, but again, the biggest question in our mind is why does ours go off and literally flood parts of our yard as its pulling up groundwater while neighbors units are not doing anything. I would think the overall water table would be relatively similar from house to house (~15 - 20' away)
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Whatever the level it stabilizes at is the level of the ground water under your house. If you want that level lowered, either try to prevent it from entering by way of curtain and foundation drains, or set your pump to whatever level you'd like it at

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Agree. It's not all that unusual for one house to have a sump pump that runs more than others in the neighborhood. The ground contours and water level are not perfectly uniform. For example, in some places, a natural spring will be bubbling out of the ground, yet 25 ft away, there is no evidence of water at the surface. You basement could also be 6" deeper, or have another entire block course, which could make a significant difference
Forget the idea that somehow plugging any holes in the sump pit is going to stop the pump from running. Water is going to seek it's natural level. It's unclear where the 10.5" is being measured from. But if you want the pump to run less, raise the float level a bit. But be careful and keep an eye on it, as if you go higher, you increase the risk of water showing up somewhere in the basement. It will try to make it's way over to the sump pump, but the higher the sump level, the lower the delta to make it to the sump low spot, instead of surfacing somewhere else.

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