sulphurous water

I have a small factory on a well in a rural community, and am having a horrible trouble with one of the water lines with blackish, putrid sulphurous water. It clears if I run it for a while, but is back within hours. I assume this is bacteria in one of the lines (since it's not all lines), but don't have a clue what to do about it. Does anyone have a quick and dirty approach to fixing this problem that won't cost a lot -- short and long term? I would be eternally grateful.
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Meredith wrote:

Try injecting bleach (can be dilute a bit) into the start of the line. How you do this will depend upon the setup.
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On 7 Sep 2006 14:59:06 -0700, "Meredith"

Have the water tested. Although it smells sulphur in low concentration is not bad for consumption, actually good for skin washes. You water may be hard. After several months you should become accustomed to it.
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Is it process water, potable water, or both you are concerned about? There are businesses that specialize in water treatment. Talk to one. They may save you a lot of money by doing the job right. You certainly don't want to mess around with the drinking water by adding anything.
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I'm concerned about the process water. And it i s really only in one of hte lines in the building, not all of the water from teh well. Other suggestions were to treat the well with chlorine. I dont' think this is how I want to go unless necessary. The well feeds several structures. Any thoughts appreciated.
meredith
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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Process water must be segregated from any potable water. Backflow preventers, air gaps, etc may be required. If you are using a lot of water, a cooling tower and recirculating system may be the best way to go. You really need professional help with this. The water must be tested to come up with the proper solution. The wrong water treatment can cause alls sorts of problems.
Since the well is feeding other buildings, you don't want to mess with it. The wrong treatment can cost you a lot of aggravation, law suites, even criminal charges if people are made ill. Get a pro. Really, it will be the cheapest and safest in the long run.
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OK. How do I identify someone to help with this -- listings in Tucson for water quality specialists? Plumbers (tried one, no help).??
thanks
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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Yellow Pages. Water treatment, water filtration
Try www.yellowpages.com
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On 10 Sep 2006 21:36:12 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm,

Choices: Call local well drillers, listed in the Jello Pages.
Call Tucson Water, tell them your problem, and they might help.
Check with these guys: http://coep.pharmacy.arizona.edu/water/index.html
Google for "Tucson water quality" for more (where that came from.)
G'luck.
------------------------------------------------------------------ Vote early, Vote often, Vote for Chad! http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website & Database Development
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First off, you need to get the water tested to ensure you're not dealing with other things like coliforms etc....
Short term. Pour bleach down the well. I don't personally recommend this approach but many will tell you it's fine. Run your water until the chlorine odor leaves.
Long Term: I suspect you are getting hydrogen sulfide (rotten egg odor?). The black is the byproduct of the bacteria (probably in the well) and it's called sulfate. Sulfates generally are not harmful although I've seen reports of them being very harmful to infants. In any case, to remove the odors, the best way to do it is through aeration. Combine that with a carbon block filter and you'll probably be fine. If your tests indicate something else like coliform, then you may need to do some sort of injection of chlorine or peroxide. In any case, I recommend you work with someone in the field to figure it out. I installed a system at my house from these guys: www.pwgazette.com and they were very easy to work with.
Cheers, cc
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Thanks for teh suggestion -- I'll see what they offer. Since it is only in one of the lines in the building, would you put it in-line, or at the inlet to the building?
James "Cubby" Culbertson wrote:

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The aeration system is for use to eliminate the odors caused by hydrogen sulfide. Are you getting rotten egg odors? I installed mine to "treat" my entire house but not the water I use for exterior use (sprinklers, hoses). I personally didn't want one sink to be fine and the shower to smell. If it's the odor you're battling, only you can decide which way to go. Now, if it's sulfate, it can't hurt to treat the whole building with a carbon filter. Depending on the size of this building, water usage etc....it may be a pretty simple thing or rather complex. I'd say get someone with knowledge to help you decide these things. Cheers, cc
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How do you choose a water filter? What does the filter actually reduce or remove? And finally what does it cost? These answers are found by doing a little research or home work will call it. Doing such will save you a lot of money and provide you with pure "healthy" drinking water. The bottom line is you must get a Data Performance Sheet by the NSF national sanitation foundation to compare filters. These "proof of performance" sheets show exactly what the filter does and for how many gallons. If you can't get one from the manufacturer or from who ever is trying to sell you one, simply say no thanks!
NSF International, The Public Health and Safety Company, a not-for-profit, non-governmental organization, is the world leader in standards development, product certification, education, and risk-management for public health and safety. For more than 59 years, NSF has been committed to public health, safety, and protection of the environment. While focusing on food, water, indoor air, and the environment, NSF develops national standards, provides learning opportunities through its Center for Public Health Education, and provides third-party conformity assessment services while representing the interests of all stakeholders. The primary stakeholder groups include industry, the regulatory community, and the public at large.
Do your home work! Make a good choice for your drinking water needs. Visit NSF below: http://www.nsf.org/consumer/drinking_water/dw_treatment.asp?program=WaterTre
The Importance of Certification In the last decade, interest in home water treatment products has grown tremendously. Unfortunately, it isn't always easy for consumers to know whether or not a particular product will actually be as safe and effective as the manufacturer claims at reducing various contaminants from your water supply. NSF has a long history of developing and running independent product testing programs. In fact, we are the leading independent tester of home water treatment products on the market today. With our state-of-the-art laboratories and highly skilled staff, we have the knowledge and expertise to effectively evaluate water treatment products, including: Adsorption filters (i.e. carbon, charcoal, KDF, ceramic) Reverse osmosis systems Water softeners Distillation systems Ultraviolet disinfection products. As an added assurance for consumers, NSF requires that all products meet annual re-certification requirements. Unannounced plant inspections and periodic retesting of all certified products are required of all NSF-listed companies. This unique requirement allows us to ensure that the products we certify continue to meet all stated requirements year after year.
Note: NSF has tested & certified over 4000 different filters. It's important to understand we have 400 plus manufacturers of water filters alone world wide. Having said this "why" would you purchase a water filter that is NOT tested & certified by NSF. It all comes down to this: Talk is cheap and facts are hard to find in the drinking water filtration industry! NSF is were you will get the facts.
Ultimately it comes down to this: What does the filter do & how much does it cost?
NSF Data performance sheets is were to find "what it does". Price: For a $1.00 a week you can have pure healthy drinking water. If you are spending "more" it's costing you too much.
Chris www.waterfilterfacts.com
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