Sulfuric acid as toilet bowl cleaner?

Page 1 of 2  
Years ago I bought a bottle of sulfuric acid from a hardware store with the intend to open a clogged pipe. I ended up opening the clog with another method. The bottle sits unused.
Many toilet bowl cleaners use hydrochloric acid as a main ingredient, since sulfuric acid is similar stuff, can I use it as a toilet bowl cleaner?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I hope you're not serious:
http://msds.chem.ox.ac.uk/SU/sulfuric_acid_concentrated.html
http://www.jtbaker.com/msds/englishhtml/s8234.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulfuric_acid
It is not that similar to hydrochloric acid.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bob wrote:

Why not. I use bleach, sometimes Scrub Free. An acid or base will clean well.
--
All is as it is.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

although you havent suggested it, mixing sodium hypochlorate (bleach) and H2SO4 can release chlorine gas AND sulfuric poured into a drain can react EXPLOSIVELY with any METAL PIPES, organic materials (such as hair, etc) and lead to some REAL unpleasant results.
i'm a chemist and have used sulfuric for 30 years in various applications. this is NOT one of them!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/29/2011 8:39 PM, bob wrote:

But sulfuric acid is (was?) a common drain cleaner. One of its features is attacking organic blocks. Would think drain cleaner would have to be strong. It was certainly one of the more hazardous household chemicals. The OP didn't say, but the sulfuric acid he bought was probably a drain cleaner.

My guess is that toilet bowl tends to get mineral accumulation. Hydrochloric acid breaks them down. Does sulfuric?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

yes, but the concentration is diluted and controlled. straight H2SO4 is very destructive
One of its features

some drain cleaners are alkali..sodium hydroxide...and they create glycerin, which is water soluble. sulfuric can attack all kinds of things in addition to organics...metals are a favorite

yes, vinegar would be better. it's much weaker but more easily controlled.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Some brands call it hydrochloric acid and some hydrogen chloride. Isn't that strange!

I don't know about this, but phosphoric acid is similar too, and they put that in Coke and we drink it. That doesn't mean we should drink the other acids.
I used to know what stomach acid was..."Gastric acid is a digestive fluid, formed in the stomach. It has a pH of 1 to 2 and is composed of hydrochloric acid (HCl) (around 0.5%, or 5000 parts per million), and large quantities of potassium chloride (KCl) and sodium chloride (NaCl)" wikip
Maybe ask in sci.chemistry if you can use your bottle of acid for this or something else.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mm wrote:

As long as they don't put any dihydrogen monoxide in it, that stuff is really toxic.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 29 Mar 2011 14:32:45 -0700, "Jon Danniken"

some kid won a science award a few years ago for a project pointing out the hazards of dihydrogen monoxide. we in the coast guard are very familiar with the dangers of this material...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/29/2011 3:32 PM, Jon Danniken wrote:

It is a vastly unappreciated danger http://www.dhmo.org/facts.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mm wrote:

Hydrogen chloride is gas; add water and it becomes hydrochloric acid. ________

Phosphoric acid has about the same relationship to sulphuric acid as Tums do to lye. Whether or not you can drink any depends on the degree of dilution.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Nonetheless, the Works disinfectant toilet bowl cleaner lists the active ingeredient as Hydrogen Chloride, its only mention.
And Lysol disinfectant power toilet bowl cleaner says that and also says "Contains Hydrochloric Acid".

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

no, no no no....phosphoric acid is a much WEAKER acid than sulfuric is.

i have and MS in chemistry, have used sulfuric for 30 years in industry. this is NOT an application that sulfuric should be used for.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, yes, yes, they are similar in that they are both acids. You don't seem to have gotten my point, which is that not all acids are alike, which is the same point I think you made in your first reply to LSMFT, after I posted.

Tell the other Bob, not me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/29/2011 12:01 PM, bob wrote:

I don't see any problem in using it but you have to take more caution with sulfuric acid than hydrochloric acid as I find it more corrosive to clothing than hydrochloric because it will not evaporate and stay on the clothing.
I don't think they sell the concentrations of sulfuric acid that will react violently with water but this is a caution and acid should always be poured into water and not vice versa. It is always a good idea to have on eye protection when working with corrosives.
Additionally the sulfate salts, e.g. ferric sulfate, are not as soluble as the chlorides and sulfuric acid may not be as efficient as hydrochloric in removing stains.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
email.me:

the acid will ETCH the porcelain surface and make it harder to clean.
acid is what's used for bathtub refinishing,to etach the porcelain surface for better adhesion of the epoxy finish.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/29/2011 4:21 PM, Jim Yanik wrote:

It might, but it is HF that is usually used to etch glass, etc. If sulfuric was that hard on porcelain, it probably would not be recommended as a drain cleaner.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Yanik wrote:

Perhaps you are thinking of hydroflouric acid? It does attack glass (porcelain), sulfuric does not; after all, it comes in glass bottles :)
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Which acid(s) will do this?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What he needs is fuming red nitric acid. (-: I splattered some when I was working in a photochem plant and it burned through my pants (bell bottoms, fortunately) like a ray gun blast and proceeded to dissolve my workboots. I reached for the reinforced chemical wipe clothes we had and within a second the paper had gone up in a puff of smoke leaving only the plastic reinforcing mesh. It taught me to respect the acids of the world.
I wouldn't recommend sulfuric acid for toilet cleaning, especially if the concentration was not known. There are far better, less noxious chemicals like oxalic acid to handle rust stains. Plus, modern toilets seem to have a tendency to spit when flushed. I saw one study that used fluorescent dye in the tank showing that water from the flush could reach as high as the height where people mount toothbrush holders. So, if you're going to use it anyway, flush with the cover down and wear goggles, gloves and long sleeved shirts and long pants.
-- Bobby G.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.