Suggestions For Fixing This Slow Cooker Handle?

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My son picked up the slow cooker pictured below for $2 at a garage sale. We tested it and it cooks just fine, but as you can see one handle is no longer attached. The center post that holds the screw protruding from the case has broken off from the handle.
http://i440.photobucket.com/albums/qq121/DerbyDad03/photobucket-4178-1391273118180_zps59633450.jpg
http://i440.photobucket.com/albums/qq121/DerbyDad03/photobucket-6516-1391273138675_zpseb0c2577.jpg
http://i440.photobucket.com/albums/qq121/DerbyDad03/photobucket-6480-1391273179784_zpsab8677a5.jpg
http://i440.photobucket.com/albums/qq121/DerbyDad03/photobucket-7890-1391273164781_zpse1085ad3.jpg
While it does not appear to be _impossible_ to remove the outer case from the inner heating core, I'd prefer not to unless absolutely necessary. The case is held on by a single press-on toothed washer over a post on the bottom of the unit and may also be sealed where the core wraps over the top of the case. The cord is secured through the case with a grommet and I doubt there is much slack inside the unit. As most of you know, this type of item is meant to be put together during manufacturing, never to taken apart again.
The main thing to consider is that the crock and contents of a slow cooker are hot and heavy, so the handle needs to be securely attached in order to be safe.
I should mention that there is a 1/2" gap between the outer case and the inside core where the 2 holes for the handle posts are. I was able to fish a length of bell wire from hole to hole, so there is no obstruction internal to the area where the handle mounts.
I've got a few thoughts on how to fix this, but I look to the wisdom of this group for creative - and safe - ideas.
BTW Yes, I know the price of new crock pot. Yes, I know I could buy him a new one in less time than it will take to fix this one.
Thanks.
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On 02/01/2014 11:27 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

When my wife and I have people over and use one of those, we never have a reason to move it. It just sits on the table and people ladle-out the food. At least for us, the handle would not be needed.
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On 2/1/2014 12:27 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

My thought is generous dose of two part grey epoxy (the over night kind) on both the stud and handle. Should end up being as strong as the original. Also, perhaps some clear epoxy where the edge of the handle meets the enamel exterior. Bit of grey epoxy where the alignment pegs go through the enamel.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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looks like a job for J-B Weld
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wrote:

I'd just get a longer screw and a washer. Put the washer on the screw, put it through the hole in the handle, and thread it into the cooker..
Unless I'm missing something obvious.
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On 2/1/2014 3:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Well, Derby did say.... (quoted text sroll up)
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Christopher A. Young
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Two part stop-leak epoxy stick. Form handle and stick into place.
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wrote:

I did miss the obvious - on second look the end of the screw is the treaded end, not the head!! so a longer screw won't help.
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On 2/1/2014 3:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

From what I could figure, the handle was put on before the top and bottom were assembled. Head of the screw is inside the enamel casing.
Totally ideal answer would be to buy a new handle, take the cooker apart, and put on the new handle from inside. But, DD has said he prefers not to dissemble the cooker.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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"ChairMan" wrote in message wrote:

looks like a job for J-B Weld
Like chairman says. Add J B Weld to the center AND both side posts. ALSO DO NOT USE the 5 minute type. It has 1/2 the strength of the 24 hour one. I was told this in a conversation with the JB owner. WW
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On 2014-02-01 11:27 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Chip away the remaining post plastic and 3d print a new post to thread around the screw. Make sure to use durable plastic.
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On 02/01/2014 01:01 PM, Adam Kubias wrote:

Good one!
Heck I'd just chip away the plastic and use a speed nut and a home made bracket.
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On Sat, 01 Feb 2014 13:01:46 -0600, Adam Kubias

Another POSSIBLE way is to take a dremel and cutting disc, cut a slot across the end of the screw, get a barrel nut to fit, start it on the thread, break the rest of the plastic off, thread the barrel nut on, using a small screwdrived down through the barrel nut to hold the screw, then drill the handle and out a short screw through the handle into the end of the barrel nut. If you can't find a barrel nut, get a peice of tubing and run a tap through it to make your own barrel nut.
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On Sat, 01 Feb 2014 15:35:29 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I agree, a barrel connector threaded onto the existing stud (cleaned off of course) then add a piece of threaded rod to the other side of the barrel connector to extend the existing stud.
Drill a hole through the handle and add a cap nut with a lock washer. Only thing I am not sure about is how hot the existing stud gets when the appliance is operating.
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In article

DerbyDad03-
If it were mine, I would not hesitate to disassemble it. I would use a small knife blade or tiny screwdriver to work the toothed washer off of the post.
You may not be able to reuse the old handle. Either using it or a substitute, you could use all three mounting holes to secure it to the pot from the inside. Either pan head sheet metal or wood screws should work.
If you insist on not disassembling the pot, the epoxy may meet your needs. You might leave part of the white plastic on the screw to keep it from flopping around while the epoxy hardens, but leave enough of the screw exposed to grip the epoxy. Perhaps an undersized fiber washer could be threaded onto the screw to hold it in place.
Fred
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On 2/1/2014 12:27 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I would not feel safe using any kind of adhesive on it, lest it let go while someone is carrying a pot full of hot food. Set it on the counter and leave it there, or buy another with a removable dish. They aren't that expensive.
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My first thought is JB Weld too.
1. I'd cut away the remains of the post on the threaded stud.
2. I'd slather JBW on the stud and into the handle stud hole AND well around it in and around the existing plastic webbing...I might even drill some holes in the webbing.
3. I'd let the JBW set up a while until it isn't real runny then put the handle on. . 4. I'd rotate and reposition the pot from time to time so that as the JBW flows while it is setting up hard it stays where I want it (which appears to be IN the handle and ON the stud).
--

dadiOH
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Call off the dogs...it's in the trash.
My son and I decided to see what it would take to remove the case and it turned out not to be so hard. However, when we opened it up we found this...
http://i440.photobucket.com/albums/qq121/DerbyDad03/photobucket-14375-1391297553673_zps61e59021.jpg
There were a few spots where the white insulation around the heater wires was cracked and separated. Every time we moved the wire, it cracked in more spots. There was no sense in going any farther because I wasn't going to put it back together knowing about the wires.
Thanks for all the responses.
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On 2/1/2014 6:41 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Like the woman said "that was fun". Or, was that the man?
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Christopher A. Young
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wrote:

Sometimes, bargains aren't.
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