Suggestion for 24V/120V relay to control new outlet?

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In typed:

I think you're confused between class definitions for Safety and what the NEC defines; they are different.
Class 1, 2, and 3 CIRCUITS are classified as remote-control, signaling, and power-limited circuits in the National Electrical Code (NEC).
Class 1 and 2 Power Supplies determines the insulation PROPERTIES of a power supply and there is no Class 3. To the layman, they either need the third ground wire or not (1 & 2 respectively).
The 8 Amp limitation IN NEC has nothing to do with UL/CSA et al classifications. A transformer can output any current it can be designed for as long as it meets the insulation and overvoltage/current test specifications and meet the safety requirements. Class 1, 2, 3 as used in the NEC as you can see above is quite different. While saftey is of course a concern, simply limiting an output to 8 amps would not deem it to be "safe". The NEC is concerned with wiring, and the Safety is concerned with safety. Two different worlds. A google for UL 1459 might be enlightening for you. You apparently already have some NEC information, or I'd assume so at least. You know NEC and I know Safety; perhaps between the two of us, we could purchse/outfit/install equipment for a home<G>.
HTH,
Twayne`

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Twayne wrote:

I think you're confused about nearly everything.

Limiting the discussion to class 2, which many people are familiar with (thermostat, doorbell):
Class 2 circuits are class 2 because they are _powered by a class 2 power supply_.

So if I buy a UL listed class 2 transformer, according to you, it is not power limited and can not be used to power a class 2 circuit. What a bizarre idea. Make that a stupid idea.
No class 3? UL category XOKV - "TRANSFORMERS, CLASS 2 AND CLASS 3".

That will surprise UL.

It might be a lot more enlightening for you.
UL 1459 is "Telephone power supplies" (and has probably been withdrawn). You are probably the only person that thinks we are talking about telephones.
Class 2 transformers are listed under UL 1585, "Class 2 and Class 3 Transformers." (There is that pesky "class 3" again.) They are power limited "in accordance with ANSI/NFPA 70, National Electrical Code (NEC)"
Some other standards may be applicable such as UL 1310, "Class 2 Power Units" which also comply "with Class 2 voltage, current and volt-ampere limits as specified in ANSI/NFPA 70, 'National Electrical Code'."
Note the reference to the power limits in the NEC.
Information is from the UL White Book.
Again you are posting nonsense.
Four months ago, in a thread about utility PF correction caps, you told HeyBub "next time I'll be a lot more careful." Obviously not. Again. <G>
--
bud--

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You're right, I cited the wrong spec; it's probably actually something like one of the 5085's. But I'm not tempted to refute anything you say because you are still getting things terribly mixed up. Perhaps you should brush up on how to read these specs too. Like, parts 1 & 2 apply unless excepted by 3 and so forth. Sorry; I don't have the time to mess with your refusal to get the proper information assembled for the project at hand.
HTH,
Twayne`
n typed:

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Twayne wrote:

Translation: you are wrong but won't admit it.
At least you admitted when you were wrong about utility PF correction caps.

I have no problem reading specs.
Like - from UL: Class 2 transformers are listed under UL 1585, "Class 2 and Class 3 Transformers." They are power limited "in accordance with ANSI/NFPA 70, National Electrical Code (NEC)"
Repeating again - from UL: The transformers are power limited "in accordance with ANSI/NFPA 70, National Electrical Code (NEC)"
Perhaps you should brush up on the English language.
Explain what makes a class 2 door bell circuit class 2.

Describe your "project at hand". I want to make sure I never get anywhere near it.
bud--

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In typed:

No. You're mixing up NEC/Safety agencies. UL and CSA and all like agencies only have classes 1 and 2, no class 3, and they deal with the safety aspects of a power transformer and its container, and must be so tested/listed in order to be sold legally anywhere in the US or Canada. You are trying to apply NEC wiring classses to the safety classes, incorrectly. The definitions are exactly as I stated.
NEC Class 1, 2, and 3 circuits are classified as remote-control, signaling, and power-limited circuits in the National Electrical Code (NEC). Transformers are NOT required to meet ANY of those requirements. The 8A is a wiring issue and part of the NEC, NOT part of safety. Look up UL 1459 and you'll see what I mean. A transformer/power supply does not HAVE to be power limited and in fact most are not, and if it's NOT power limited, that section does not apply. Most transformers are NOT power limited but per Safety agencies can never, under ANY load including locked rotors, solenoids, short ckts, etc., can never present a fire or safety hazard to anyone or anything. A class 1 OR class 2 24V transformer sold in North America is required to have UL or CSA or equivalent markings and submissions or be listed as a component. INSTALLATION of same is where NEC comes in, and may or may not apply; usually not. If it does not claim to be a class 3 installation device, then it's a moot point; other parts of the NEC will apply. HTH,
Twayne`

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DigiKey.com They will have what you need. ww
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horizon wrote:

Radio Shack, and similar, have remote switches for electrical outlets. Meant to control things like lamps from across the room by radio control, they may very well fit your needs. They're very cheap, like under ten dollars.
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MR-101 or PAM-1 should do what you need, also I think Air Products sells a similar one that mounts to a knockout of a handy box which might be exactly what you're looking for. Don't remember part number off the top of my head.
You probably won't be able to mount it in the same box as the outlet for box fill reasons. I'd put it up in the attic so you don't have a blank plate showing in your living space.
nate
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In typed:

Check out X10.com. They have what you need, it's wireless, and requires nothing special but an outlet. You could have as many switches to control it as you wanted. Right now it's $19.99 but prices change often there. I've nothing to gain from them; just love their toys & products.
HTH,
Twayne`
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Thanks for the suggestion, but I can't use X10 for two reasons. One is the control signal comes from a controller that already supplies a 24volt output. That also rules out some of the suggestions where the transformer function is already included in the relay. The second problem with X10 is reliability is a concern.
I still think Daring Dufas's relay in a box fits all the reqts.
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On 11/05/10 11:49 AM, horizon wrote:

24VAC or 24VDC?
For 24VAC what you want is a pump start relay that works with 24VAC sprinkler systems. Already complete in a box. Start here: "http://www.google.com/products?q=pump+relay+irrigation&hl=en&aq=f ".
For a 24VDC coil, 10A contacts relay go to "http://www.allelectronics.com/make-a-store/item/RLY-2024/24-VDC-DPDT-10-AMP-RELAY//1.html ". You'll have to put it into an enclosure yourself.
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