Suggestion for 24V/120V relay to control new outlet?

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I'm looking for suggestions on a 24volt relay with contacts that can handle 120V, 7 amps. I'm looking to install it to control a new 120V outlet that is going in an attic and needs to be controlled by a 24V signal to turn it on. So, I'm looking for one that is cost effective and can be mounted in some simple type of wiring box. If it can go in the same box as the outlet, even better. I'd like to make this code compliant and do it right. Plenty of space is available as I can mount just about anything on a stud in the unfinished attic.
Thanks for any input.
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After posting, I realized that while I said I only need 7 amps, since it's an outlet on a 15 amp circuit I guess I actually need one capable of min of 15 amps.
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On Tue, 11 May 2010 11:49:48 -0700 (PDT), horizon

Try something like this
http://dale-electric.com/search.php?itemnumber=rr7&manufacturer=&keywords=&category=&sortby=1&resultsPerPage %
The RR7 is a good choice It has a turn on and a turn off coil and latches in the last state you put it in. You control this with a momentary contact SPDT center off sw.
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On May 11, 3:12 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I controlled a relay like this powering the coil with only 9v batteries. Since there is no hold-in current required you can put a capacitor in parallel with 3 9volt batteries and use a couple of push buttons to control it. The batteries will last practically their shelf life.
Jimmie
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horizon wrote:

I would use a RIB "relay in a box". Most electrical, HVAC and electronics supply houses have them in stock.
http://hvac.functionaldevices.com/chartPilot.html
TDD
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http://www.tequipment.net/Remcon.html
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What are you attempting to automatically control with the relay ?
What is the source of the input control signal ?
The most difficult issue for you is going to be finding an enclosure which isolates the line voltage side of the relay from the low voltage...
Depending on what you are using for your control input you might want to find a relay that is made by the same company as the rest of the equipment in place... It would also be a good idea to obtain information from the OEM asking them if using the equipment with an external relay is safe and won't interfere with the normal operation just so that whatever accessory you are going to be controlling via the relay won't void a warranty or something like that if external relay terminals aren't provided...
~~ Evan
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On Tue, 11 May 2010 13:43:39 -0700 (PDT), Evan

The 3 that have been linked here mount in a 1/2" knockout with the line voltage inside the box and the low voltage outside.
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I was going to suggest a typical boiler relay like Taco SR501, but then I saw both John Grabowski's, and gfretwell's replies, which make even more sense. I don't know the one John suggested, but if you can live with the amperage rating, it's a nice self contained unit. The rr7 that gfretwell suggested, does need a 24 volt power supply, but it has a high amperage rating, and those relays will last forever.
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*Roy I recently discovered these when a customer asked me to fix his closet light. I thought that it was a nice compact unit that is made to fit in an electrical box. It can also be used to replace relay switches. The OP didn't mention what the load consisted of so I threw it out there for him to decide if he could use it or not.
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smaller. I've been buying from Tequipment recently, in fact I just got a couple of proximity voltage testers today, and I got my last pair of Klein lineman's from them. They have incredibly low prices, and being in NJ the shipping is quick
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*The customer service at Tequipment was very good when I called for the relay. I was going to drive down to pick it up, but the woman on the phone said it would ship out the same day I called and I would have it the next day. Sure enough I received it the next day. I will check out their prices for tools.
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RBM wrote:

Are they "Tequipment.net"?. I could always use a source of low priced Klein tools.
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Of the suggestions, it looks like the one that will work is Daring Dufas's relay in a box suggestion.
http://www.functionaldevices.com/pdf/RIBU1CW.pdf
It meets all my requirements:
easy to mount as it comes in it's own box 15 amps so controlling outlet on 15 amp circuit is OK takes 24V input available online for $21
One remaining question. Someone mentioned isolation of the 24V circuit from 120V circuit? I would assume that since an electrical equipment manufacturer is making these relays and they are UL listed they are OK and meet code for my application even though the 24V wires obviously go into the same box as the 120V wires?
Thanks again for the suggestions
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Happens inside your heating systems so I'm guessing it's ok. If you want to go cheap look behind some hvac contractors on the weekend for junk ac compressors. They all have a relay that is pulled with 24vac and handles anywhere form 20 amps and up. The hvac guys call them contactors but it's just a relay.
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HVAC guys use 24 vac relays often enough. Should be easy enough to get one.
--
Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

HVAC guys and control system guys like me use the RIB because we're lazy and don't want to have to do a lot of screwing around to accomplish a simple task. I'll pay $20 for a manufactured solution rather than blow $100 worth of labor to build my own. It's simple economics, I only build things that aren't available off the shelf for a reasonable price.
TDD
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horizon wrote:

They can both be in the same box when required - such as to connect to a relay. Just keep the wires separate.
--
bud--

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wrote:

Better is the relay like the RR7 where the coil part sticks out of the box through a 1/2" K/O and the 24v is not exposed to the 120v side. Those relays that have both in the same box are listed as part of a piece of listed equipment, not general premisses wiring.
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That is one handy gizmo. How much are they? For anyone who builds or plays around with home equipment, a few of those in the spare parts bin would be terrific.
--
Nonny
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