Suggested power tools to buy for beginner

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Hello, I'm new to home improvement and am looking to buy several power tools to assist me. I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on what a good "base" set of tools would be. I have about $500 to spend. I already have a good collection of screwdrivers, hammers, levels, etc. I was thinking about the following items:
Hammer Drill with decent power (19 amps) Compound miter saw (10 in) Circular saw (7 3/4) Air Nailers and compressor
Any subtractions or additions suggested would be appreciated. I was thinking a jig saw might be better than the circular saw.
Home Depot currently has 3 air nailers and a 6 gallon compressor/tank for $300. The nailers are finishing, brad, and crown. Would those nailers be ok for light work, like building a dog house or sheetrocking, or would I need a framing nailer for that? Also, would the 6 gallon tank be enough to power the framing nailer?
Thanks alot for your time. Jim
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I think you could fix just about anything with a plasma cutter.
-rev
JimmyD wrote:

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Hammer drill? They're mostly used for drilling masonry. Unless you have a specific project in mind which requires that tool, it'll collect dust. You should have a normal drill, either corded or cordless. I rarely have a need for a cordless, so I bought a reasonably powerful corded model from Sears, which has been trouble free for about 7 years now.
Nailers? I wouldn't spend that money just to have it around for a dog house. And, for sheetrock, you use screws, which brings you back to the drill, above, although cordless will be handier for this kind of work.
Circular saw: Useful sometimes, although lately, I've been having big sheets of plywood cut to size at the store.
Miter saw: Those are fun.
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JimmyD wrote:

...
For those kinds of project, you don't need a nailer at all--sheetrock _should_ be hung w/ sheetrock screws for which you need a decent cordless drill/driver. Even w/ nailing it you don't use a pneumatic nailer. This is one of the most useful homeowner tools, but I wouldn't make it _too_ big/heavy/cumbersome. Hammer drill option ok, but really is a special-purpose option for things like masonry-drilling so unless you foresee that in the near future, is probably a waste of initial investment. I'm partial to the Milwaukee 19.2V jobbie I have, but for some purposes it's pretty awkward. Would certainly not recommend anything heavier as an initial purchase for general use.
Circular saw is good, jigsaw is less so in general, but if need inside cuts or curved cuts is invaluable. Personally wouldn't take the jigsaw first over the circular saw, though, they're two different purpose tools and, at least for me, the circular saw gets at least 10x the work.
Miter saw is also a nicety for initial purchase unless intend to do something like interior trim or similar that has a real need for it--for small framing jobs it's mostly way overkill.
I'd rather recommend starting w/ the circular saw and cordless drill and then going from there as you find a real need/purpose/use. You'll know it when you get there... :)
BTW, if you're thinking of the jigsaw as somehow related to cutting sheetrock, you don't saw sheetrock at all, you score a face and then break it...
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My f-i-l nearly died when I took a hammer to a piece of drywall for his house!!!!!!!!
OP: don't buy anything until you have a need for it and then do research on the item needed. Start saving and then buy quality tools as you have a genuine need for them. Of all the specific tools listed, the circular saw is the one I use most. I have a hammer drill, but rarely use the hammer feature (once on removing a stubborn screw). Before I got it (a cordless) I had a few occasions where the hammer feature would have been useful.
Mike D.
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JimmyD wrote:

Get a very good cordless driver/drill. Adding the hammer feature is worth doing IMHO. I like the 18v models by either Makita or Milwaukee. A nice cordless drill will likely be the tool you use more than any other.
Your second choice would be my second as well. I recently invested in a Makita LS1221. Very versatile tool, and being 12" allows for cutting a little bigger stock than a 10". The unit is not really much bigger or heavier than a 10", worth the upcharge, again IMO.
Like the previous poster, I don't see where your air tools will get that much use. If I needed to shoot a bunch of nails, I'd probably go with a Pasload (spelling?) nail gun. No inconvenient air hose to drag around.
How about an electric (corded or not, depending on power requirements) impact gun. I had a bitch of a time removing the blades from my 60" ZTR mower. A milwaukee corded impact paid for itself the first time I used it in terms of ease of use, and elimination of skinned knuckles.
Another thing that's real handy to have is an Amprobe tester. Great for checking volts, amps, Ohms, etc on multiple things around the home & shop.
My 2cents
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Yes, but the OP was talking about power tools, so I didn't go there. There would be many other non-power tools too.
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Funny how a jig saw is better for cutting a circle than a circular saw. Do not buy a left handed monkey wrench.
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Cordless sawzall, before I had it I didn't realize how badly I needed it. Wit a good selection of blades, it will cut metal, wood, & even prune trees. Nothing says; you're coming out, no matter what, like a sawzall.
As to the drill, I bought 2 new ones a year or so ago, first came a Dewalt 3/8" 2 speed 18volt, nice drill, but I needed 2 so a help would have one on some jobs. I picked up a Dewalt 1/2" 3 speed 18volt hammer drill. Frankly the 3/8 gets little use, the 3 speed feature along with a sturdier feel makes it the first one anyone picks up. Driving screws is infinitely easier in 1st speed, drilling and mixing paint fall to speed 2, speed 3 has its uses, I know I've used it, but don't remember for what.
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JimmyD wrote:

If you are planning to tear out any old construction in one of your renovation projects I recommend a Sawzall or similar reciprocating saw. Useful and very satisfying.
Cam
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Amen to that! Amazing how well 45 year old doug fir holds 16d nails- much easier just to take that closet stub wall trapping the furnace and water heater out in 3-foot sections. Burns just as well.
aem sends...
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You'll use a good old regular corded drill more than all the rest of the items combined. You can use it with wire brush attachments, abrasive attachements, all types of driver bits, spinning a coat hanger wire bent into a zig-zag to mix paint.... and, oh yeah...drilling! :) Pilot holes are good practice just about any time you use a screw.
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...

Or sometimes for a nail.
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David Combs wrote:

... and always for a rivet.
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What projects do you have planned? That would determine what you need. Some of the saws you list are somewhat interchangeable, but all do one particular function better.
The miter saw is very good if you plan to do a wood floor, crown molding, or a lot of framing where cutting to length accurately is required. It is not good for building a bookcase, closet shelves. Circular was can do the cutting to length but takes a bit more practice to get square. Same with a jig saw, but don't waste your money on the cheap ones as they don't cut accurately and are a PITA to handle.
Drills are a subject that can be debated for a long time. I have a Panasonic 15.6 volt that has a lot of power, yet is reasonably light and small to handle. Small is good for using as a power screw driver. Heavy is good for drilling into masonry. Corded tools are good in that they are less expensive and batteries don't go dead. If you plant to use it more as a driver, consider a 12V, but it you have 100 anchors to put in concrete, get an 18V or 24V. I've never found the need to buy a hammer drill.
Small compressor is always handy to have. If I had to choose one nailer, I'd get the finish nailer. Brands are good for taking stuff, same with staples. None are good for sheetrock.
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I'll add this: If he foresees molding work being a rarity, there's nothing wrong with a good mitre box and saw.
There's something funny about the way wives view tool purchases. Because so many comedians have focused on our love for power tools, many women see a non-power tool purchase as almost invisible, which can make it a lot easier to buy yet another tool just a week later.
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wrote in message

or
not
a
NONSENSE!!!!!!!!! My son has a very cheap (Harbor Freight) sliding compound miter saw. It is EXCELLENT for straight, square (in both directions) cuts necessary for good fitting corners in shelves and bookcases. It would be foolish to use anything else other than a radial arm saw to make the precision cuts necessary on shelves and bookcases!
Mike D.
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wrote in message

Mike, that's known as luck. Next time HF needs a batch of those, they may use a totally different Chinese factory and the result might be a piece of junk.
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Mike Dobony wrote:

That's if you don't have a table saw, in which case, a crosscut sled made from $2.00 worth of labor and materials will cut dead square and leave your stock with clean, tearout-free edges.
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All good advice. I'd get a good jigsaw, for sure. (The new Bosh will set you back, but it's really versatile.)
Forget the air nailer for now.
Get a good circular saw, which can be fitted with a variety of blades for different purposes.
The miter saw is useful if you have to do a bunch of trim or flooring.
All of that said, however: If you're going to build anything from scratch (like furniture), make a serious hobby out of woodworking, and have some space, most woodworkers will tell you that a table saw is the one tool to have. It can do miters and crosscuts like a miter saw, rips much better than a circular saw, and even joinery using a thick dado blade, or a home-made tenoning jig. It seems like a luxury (even a low-level "contractor" saw can do the job, but it might cost $300).
Good luck.
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