Suggested Appliance Replacement Periods

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FYI...
In reference to the suggested times
Air conditioners: 8 to 15 years Dishwashers: 5 to 12 years Disposals: 5 to 12 years Dryers: 8 to 12 years Freezers: 15 to 20 years Furnaces: 8 to 12 years Heat pumps: 8 to 12 years Refrigerators: 15 to 20 years Stoves: 15 to 20 years Washers: 8 to 12 years Water heaters: 8 to 12 years
I find my own experience with the most current appliances has been...
Air conditioners: 15 years Dishwashers: 21 years Disposals: 31 years Dryers: 23 years Freezers: 23 years Furnaces: 15 years Heat pumps: N/A Refrigerators: 23 years Stoves: 31 years Washers: 23 years Water heaters: 31 years
As you can see, many of my appliances have lasted beyond the suggested replacement periods before needing replacement.
Two comments on this article.
First is when you can save substantial money with improved efficiency, I think it is a good idea to replace the appliance. Refrigerators, freezers, dryers, furnaces and air conditioners fall under this heading. These are appliances that run for a long period of time and use considerable amount of energy.
Second when you buy an appliance buy one as generic as possible. The more fashion conscious it is, the sooner it will be out of style and become an eyesore. There is a reason why white is the most popular color of appliances.
Third is always consider these types of articles with a grain of salt. With the housing market and the economy in free fall, appliance manufacturers are desperate to get the consumer to buy their wares. Many industry trade groups will commission a writer to produce articles to motivate consumers under the guise of saving money to buy their wares. (If you look you will find the car companies are doing the same thing.) Before doing any purchase, do the cost analysis to determine whether there will be a true saving.
Comments?
TMT
http://abcnews.go.com/Business/Consumer/Story?id=3789039&page=1
Creative Consumer: Time to Fix or Trash Your Appliances? Elisabeth Leamy's Tips About What to Do With Your Aging Appliances By ELISABETH LEAMY ABC NEWS Consumer Correspondent Oct. 29 2007 —
I got some new appliances for my kitchen this week. Woo hoo! When we bought our house a couple of years ago, one of the less-than-appealing aspects was the collection of 1980s-era kitchen appliances. They were ugly and didn't work well either. But the darn things just would not fail altogether. So I kept wondering, should I take them to the repair shop or the junkyard?
I finally got my act together to research a reputable appliance repair firm, and when I told the company my address, I got lucky. Turns out the previous owner had also used this company and I was able to find out that they had worked on the oven multiple times. That was all the excuse I needed. And then I needed a dishwasher and microwave to match, right?
Whether to fix it or trash it is a tough call. The first step is to check your warranty. Many household appliances have long-term manufacturer's warranties. Next, get an estimate. If the repair cost is 50 percent or more of the price of replacement, you should scrap it.
If the repair cost is 50 percent or less, ask yourself some questions. What kind of shape is the appliance in? If it's already been fixed several times like my oven, it may not be worth another overhaul. Do newer models offer vastly improved features? For example, new refrigerators use less energy than old ones. You may be able to recoup part of the cost of replacement that way.
Consider whether the appliance is unique. If it fits into an odd space or it's an unusual color, it may be too expensive and difficult to replace. Finally, figure out how old the appliance is. Over the years, experts have figured out the average life of most household appliances.
Air conditioners: 8 to 15 years
Dishwashers: 5 to 12 years
Disposals: 5 to 12 years
Dryers: 8 to 12 years
Freezers: 15 to 20 years
Furnaces: 8 to 12 years
Heat pumps: 8 to 12 years
Refrigerators: 15 to 20 years
Stoves: 15 to 20 years
Washers: 8 to 12 years
Water heaters: 8 to 12 years
Don't just open up the phone book and get an estimate from the company with the biggest ad. Ask friends and family for referrals and check out the companies with the better business bureau and your county or state consumer protection office. Keep in mind, in some states, appliance repair companies have to be licensed. If you don't have a solid referral, plan on getting more than one repair estimate on expensive appliances.
When you call for an appointment, be ready with the make and model number of the appliance. That way you can make sure the company services that brand and that the technician is prepared to bring the proper tools. Ask whether the company charges for estimates. Most companies waive that fee if you go ahead with the repair work. Find out the charge for the first half hour of work and see if there's a minimum repair charge.
When the technician comes to your home, ask for a written estimate. That estimate should list all parts needed, plus labor charges. Some states require the technician to get your permission if the price is going to rise more than 10 percent above the written estimate. Find out if the company offers a warranty and get it in writing. Typically, repair companies guarantee their labor for 30 days, parts for 90 days.
Once you choose a repair company, alert the technician up front that you are going to want your old parts back. This is a good test to make sure the technician really does replace those parts. Keep in mind, the technician cannot give you your old parts if they contain hazardous materials or if the manufacturer requires their return in exchange for warranty service.
Don't pay big bucks up front. Established companies should not ask you for any money at the beginning of the job. Certainly don't pay more than ten or twenty percent. When the job is complete, pay by check or credit card. It's hard to fight the charges if you pay cash. If the company has misdiagnosed your machine, it should send a technician back at no charge. However, if the new repair requires different parts, you may get some money back or owe some more.
If you take small appliances or electronics to a repair store, get a claim check before you leave your belongings behind. And pick your items up in a timely manner to avoid storage fees.
Beware of situations where appliance repair companies approach you. An air conditioning company called William B. and offered to tune up his AC unit for $34.95. Once the technicians got in the door, they claimed William's air conditioner needed much more than a tune-up. They persuaded him to pay $259 for all sorts of services he probably didn't need at all. Unfortunately, upselling like this is common.
Be the hunter, not the hunted. Don't do business with companies that come to you out of the blue. Beware of companies that call and claim to be subsidiaries or affiliates of the company you usually use. And don't panic if one of these companies tells you your appliance is a hazard. That's an age-old ploy. Stop using the appliance and get a second opinion.
To Be a Savvy Consumer Figure out if the appliance is under warranty. If so, contact an authorized repair facility and the fix should be free.
Check out appliance repair companies with the BBB and your state and county consumer protection agencies. Also check to see if they are properly licensed, if applicable.
Get an itemized written estimate and a written warranty.
Apply the 50 percent test to decide whether to repair or replace the appliance.
Don't do business with appliance repair companies that contact you until you check them out.
Where to Complain If you have difficulty with an appliance repair company, contact your county and state consumer protection offices plus the Better Business Bureau. If the company must be licensed, complain to the state agency that licensed that industry.
Copyright © 2009 ABC News Internet Ventures
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What is the source for the appliance life spans?
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snipped-for-privacy@juno.com wrote:

Straight from someone's arse. You can tell from the smell.
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Good question...I do not know.
That is why I included the link to the article for anyone who wanted to follow up on the sources.
TMT
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Too_Many_Tools wrote:

Those numbers are completely meaningless.
What matters is whether the device has failed or not and what the cost of the repair is relative to the cost of replacement and that last isnt constant either, obviously if you can repair it yourself and just pay for the parts required, its going to be viable to repair it for longer than if you have to pay someone else to repair it etc.

And with some of those the replacement isnt just because its better value to replace it, it can be just because the new device is more capable than the old one was and you just say get sick of manually defrosting the original manual defrost fridge etc and go for a frost free etc.

Just goes to show how stupid that 'suggested replacement period' idea is.

And since advances with particular technology arent uniform, the idea of a specified replacement cycle is even sillier.

I'm never ever stupid enough to replace stuff for that reason.

Doesnt work with laptops and other electronic appliances.
And its unlikely that say the bare metal style will go out of fashion any time soon anyway.

I dont even bother to read them in the first place.

Its nothing like in free fall.

Mindless conspiracy theory. This type of article has been around forever.

Hardly anyone bothers to read that sort of article about cars.

It isnt just about savings. I replaced a working 1950s fridge just because I got sick of manually defrosting it and because it was too small for my approach to shopping, a major run every 2 months or so, just because its too boring to bother with.

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Rod Speed wrote:

Yes. And sometimes its the other way round, an older appliance can be more reliable, easier to use, better looking, etc. Some people still have a few ancient appliances that it would be crazy to replace with new, 1950s, 1920s etc.

Thats only true when the savings outweight the replacement cost, which is frequently not the case. When calculating savings one also has to take into account expected lifetimes of the newer replacement, which in some cases can be all too short. Its a mistake to assume replacement is the way to go with many furnaces.

you got to live with it for 20+ years. So no lime green fridges!

I think Rod's spot on this time.
These sort of articles are just mindless junk turned out to pretend to be useful to magazine buyers, and theyre always there to help sell more appliances, and always have been. The mag positively reviews the things it sells, increasing sales, so advertisers want to adv in that mag. Same old - its just a bs game. No conspiracy, its just each party taking actions that suit their own ends.
NT
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At best they are averages. There may be some basis for the numbers, but there are too many variables to be useful. Some appliances start out with better made parts. Some people use the dishwasher twice a day, others twice a week. Some people just seem to abuse anything mechanical.
They state a dishwasher can last 5 to 12 years. So what? A range like that does little to help a potential buyer decide anything. Most of our appliances have lasted near or past the top numbers they give. .
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

All of mine have, and WAY past the top number too.
But then I'm one of the few I know that kept a new car for 35+ years and only replaced that because I was stupid enough to not fix a known leaking windscreen until the floor rusted out and was no longer legally registerable anymore.
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On Sat, 24 Jan 2009 17:16:57 +1100, in misc.consumers.frugal-living "Rod Speed"
The ones that I have bought new lasted as long or longer then those numbers. I always buy used washers and dryers and have never replaced one but have had to repair them myself or pay for repairs on them several times.
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snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

Yeah, I do that with a Sunbeam Mixmaster that still works fine.
Picked up another identical one at a yard sale for peanuts.
Its amazing what those go for on ebay.

He is every time, and dont you forget it |-)

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I had a water heater work for 35 years and a refigerator for 45 years, but that's when things were made in the USA.
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Nothing is made like it used to be, I have a 80b yr old boiler, new units fail in 10. Its to much cheapining in major China controls or overseas parts.
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On Fri, 23 Jan 2009 13:49:21 -0800 (PST), in misc.consumers.frugal-living

Don't blame China, blame capitalism. Once the saturation rate for a new device is reached (such as radios when they are first invented) the only market left is for replacements.
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On Fri, 23 Jan 2009 13:49:21 -0800 (PST), ransley

80 yrs old because you are too cheap to replace it with something much more efficient all the while thinking it is just as cheap to operate. The utility companies love idiots like you. Bubba
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Too_Many_Tools wrote:

You're an amateur.
"[UK] Frederick Stephens was among the first in Britain to buy [a microwave oven] and 150,000 meals later, it is still going strong. "
He bought it 40 years ago.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1126982/Britains-oldest-microwave-going-strong-40-years--150-000-meals.html
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On Sat, 24 Jan 2009 07:19:15 -0600, in misc.consumers.frugal-living "HeyBub"

Kewl.. mine is a 1975 Sharp Carousel and it wieghs much more then a modern microwave. The door is so solid on mine that I find myself slamming the doors on the newer models in the office. I just wish I could find an easy way to replace the light bulb.
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I have the same microwave Sharp Carousel and I have to laugh when I think about how well it still works. I can't figure out which of my kids to leave it to.
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On Sat, 24 Jan 2009 12:45:23 -0800 (PST), in misc.consumers.frugal-living

Awesome.. :) I got mine from my parents when they bought a newer one, it was the first microwave they ever bought and I still remember the day they got it. Is yours harvest gold color too? The newer microwaves are much faster but I'm not going to switch.
The above story in the daily mail a hoax I think. The microwave in that article seems to be a newer model. Some people say it is from 1984. Also he must be making 10.2739 meals a day for his number to be correct.
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Sue Bilkens wrote:

>http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1126982/Britains-oldest-microwave-going-strong-40-years--150-000-meals.html
a touch control nuke, doesnt look too 1960s :)
In the early 90s I saw a pre-67 nuke in someone's flat, forget the brand but it looked like it came from the ark, and it continued cooking until the door was something like 6" open.

IIRC - and its been a while since I played with one of those - there were 2 light arrangements in those, one type via a flap you could easily uncsrew, and the other arrangement you had to take the whole cover off to get to. And IIRC some (or both?) were 120v bulbs with push-on tags on the bases. The best solution I found to the 120v bulbs was to fit a SES bulbholder and use a standard 240v bulb, 25w or 40w.
NT
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how about numbers for microwave ovens and vacuum cleaners. I find I am in a constant battle against planned obsolescence with vacuum cleaners. Even my really expensive "Shark" needs repair all the time.
My microwave was made in 1975, (harvest gold color) it is by todays standards very slow and very sturdy. Just a dial and two buttons on the front so even a 4 year old can operate it. I wish it was faster but I don't replace it because I know a newer model would not last as long.
On Fri, 23 Jan 2009 09:23:07 -0800 (PST), in misc.consumers.frugal-living

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