suction off air compressor

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The shop vac I have, from the eighties, has a ball that floats, and shuts off the air if the tank fills.
Do the new shop vacs have a motor that's isolated from the air flow?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
However, many (if not most) "shop vacs" ARE specifically made to suck not only wet stuff but straight water. They do not pass intake air over the motor like many household vacuums do. (The first 50 or so shop vacs on HD's web site all say "Wet/Dry".)
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He said he's sucking the AIR out of the pipe.
Yes, he was also worried about water. But you can use the cacuum into a pail, and from the pail to the pipe - pail acts as water trap for safety.
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What wet stuff?
Regardless, vacuum cleaners need air flow or they can burn out.
I think it would be fine for the purpose for a limited time interval. Shop vac. Most people have them.
Even a compressor Venturi jet will draw a vacuum.
How about canned vacuum.
Greg
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Oren wrote:

Yes you can with an attachment. Here's one from HF, less than $16.00. Get yours today.
http://www.harborfreight.com/air-vacuum-pump-with-r134a-and-r12-connectors-96677.html
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There is no real differance in the simple air compressors and vacuum pumps. The air that comes out of the compressor has to come from somewhere. It does not just make the air that comes out of it. The same for the vacuum pump. When it sucks out the air, the air has to go somewhere.
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Oren wrote:

Well, with this attachement, you can.
You hook this device to an air compressor, turn on the air compressor, and this attachment produces a vacuum. The AIR-VAC has no moving parts. It uses the venturi principle to create a vacuum in the same way that paint is sucked out of a container attached to a compressor.
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But they are NOIZY critters!!!!!!
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wrote:

It's called the Venturi effect, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venturi_effect
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Use a venturi attachment, as HeyBub suggests. I use one in my business, to vacuum pot guitar pickups, and transformers. They're dirt cheap and work very well. Just say "nay" to the naysayers who claim you can't use compressed air to create a vacuum. It's standard operating procedure.
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Wrong tool for the job. Suggest a shop vac instead. It is indeed possible that water could damage the air compressor if sufficient quantity entered the cylinder.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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