suction off air compressor

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I have a PORTER-CABLE 0.8 HP 6-Gallon 150 PSI Electric Air Compressor. I want to create suction to pull air out of a line going to a swimming pool. I am trying to seal a plastic pipe with glue and want to suck some glue into the gaps around the join. How do I do this? BTW, will I damage the air compressor if I get water inside.
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On 8/19/2012 10:00 AM, Deodiaus wrote:

without vacuum.
Think about what you're trying to do. If your vacuum is perfect, you can get ~15PSI differential pressure. Now, take the cross sectional area of the gap you're trying to fill. Note that the actual force applied is miniscule. One of two things will happen. 1)The force is insufficient to move the glue and nothing happens. 2)The force is sufficient to move the glue and sucks it all out leaving a hole. I wouldn't count on that perfect storm of pressure, hole profile and glue viscosity.

But if you suck in too much at once, depending on the pump design, you can bust it instantly...or not... Chlorine doesn't help. I wouldn't do it.
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The only problem with all of the above is that using a vacuum to draw glue into a PVC fitting like he's doing is a common thing, especially in the pool world. And it works.
Consider that water will come out of a pin hole leak in a pipe under little pressure. So there is no reason to think that PVC glue won't work it's way into the hole under vacuum as well. And all you need is a tiny bit, probably less than a single drop, to fix a pin hole leak in the pool lines.
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On 8/19/2012 10:43 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

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wrote:

Yes, the technique works, for a while...
But then the same area begins to leak again, because the failing component you "repaired" by sucking PVC adhesive into the holes with a vacuum is still compromised and was not replaced...
If you don't want to cut out the piping or fitting and replace the faulty leaky pieces, there are external pressure clamps which can be applied to piping to temporarily repair said piping until such time that it can be properly replaced...
Sucking glue into pinhole leaks in PVC piping is like using white toothpaste to fill the nail holes in the wall of a rented apartment to get off without paying for the repairs when you move out...
You can shine an apple that is rotten on the inside and make it look good, but it isn't honest -- a pressure clamp reminds you that you have something which needs proper repairs...
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On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 18:31:41 -0700 (PDT), Evan

yield a permanent repair. It can even yield a permanent repair to a crack, as long as the strain that caused the crack is eliminated.
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On Aug 19, 10:53pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

As usual, Evan is living in a different world. It's a freaking PVC line for a pool. Even if the pin hole leak does start leaking again someday, which I have not seen happen, it's not like it's going to bring down a ceiling or ruin an oak floor. No big deal if it leaks a wee puddle of water again someday. And he has no clue what a pain in the ass it is to make repairs on some of these pool pads where everything is packed in tight, vs sucking some glue into a little pin hole leak at a fitting.
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Pr the outside air pressure will cause enough glue to be forced into the crack to do the job. It HAS been done successfully before.

Water in the compressor head is NOT a good idea.

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On 8/19/2012 1:09 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You're saying that you never had to drain the water out of your tank?

Agreed, but there's not much you can do to keep it out. Water is everywhere.

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Air has water vapor in it. When the air is compressed it can not hold the water. That water will condense when the air expands and cools off and go in the storage tank.
If you are using a piston type pump and it sucks in water such as from the swimming pool, the liquid may cause the valves to break as the liquid water will not compress. Probably will not as only one of the valves are open at one time and the water in the clyinder can go out.
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Tank yes - that is the "air reciever" the compressor is the pump.

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It would seem it should be obvious how to do it if it was possible. There would have to be some type of "inlet" fitting on the compressor that you could connect to. I've never seen such a thing.
For what you're trying to do, most people use a shop vac. The hose size usually will fit the 2" waste outlet which is typically on the filtering system.
As for possibly damaging the compressor, yes I would think that's a definite risk too.
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On Sunday, August 19, 2012 10:00:06 AM UTC-7, Deodiaus wrote:

Would a shopvac work instead?
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On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 10:35:08 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I would think that it would work better--- It will suck by nature, will move a whole lot more volume of air at a lower psi which is what the op is trying to do.
Jim
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Could work, if you build a liquid and air separator.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

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Try a shop vac.
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On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 10:00:06 -0700 (PDT), Deodiaus

and if you get water in you will definitely stand a good chance of damaging the compressor. Use the shop vac instead. Or even your household vac cleaner.
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On 8/19/2012 1:06 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: Use the shop vac instead. Or even your

This is a BAD idea. Any vacuum not specifically designed to suck wet stuff will likely pass the air right over the motor. Water in a motor is a bad idea.
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On Sunday, August 19, 2012 4:54:18 PM UTC-4, mike wrote:

However, many (if not most) "shop vacs" ARE specifically made to suck not only wet stuff but straight water. They do not pass intake air over the motor like many household vacuums do. (The first 50 or so shop vacs on HD's web site all say "Wet/Dry".)
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On 8/19/2012 2:29 PM, Larry Fishel wrote:

wet stuff but straight water. They do not pass intake air over the motor like many household vacuums do. (The first 50 or so shop vacs on HD's web site all say "Wet/Dry".) So, you're agreeing!
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