submergable sump pump

I have a Wayne 1/2 hp submergible sump pump with a vertical float ,is there any way to adjust the float ,right now it kicks in every minute ,i have check valve,long extensions on my down spouts ,proper grading around the house.I live on a hill,which makes no sense ,this my first experience with submergible pump ,I've always had pedestal pumps ,which the float could be adjusted.???? thanks
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Is the float on a long vertical rod, or just on a short cord tethered to the pump? I normally pump once or twice a day, right now I am pumping every 10 minutes, so the ground is thawed and saturated so pumping should be at a maximum. How often was it pumping out two months ago??
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You only have one option. MOVE TO ANOTHER HOUSE! (Be sure to burn down your current one, so no one else has your problems).
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On Apr 17, 9:21 pm, American_citizen# snipped-for-privacy@here.com wrote:

You mean submersible pump. If you have a pedestal pump, you could have either a float on a vertical rod (most likely), or you could have a float on a cord tethered to the pedestal vertical shaft or tethered to the pump( that is at the bottom of the sump).
I'll assume you have a float tethered to the pump at the bottom. You need to change the length of the tethering cord to the float so the float is not upside down until the water level is higher, or change the location where the tether is connected to the pump to maybe somewhere up on the vertical outlet pipe. Take the cover off the sump and look, it isn't all that complicated, not even close to rocket science.
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no it's not tethered float,it is vertical float rod,it starts 9" and stops 4 ",the way the water pours in it runs almost continually.But e have getting a lot of rain in Wisconsin
wrote in message wrote:

You mean submersible pump. If you have a pedestal pump, you could have either a float on a vertical rod (most likely), or you could have a float on a cord tethered to the pedestal vertical shaft or tethered to the pump( that is at the bottom of the sump).
I'll assume you have a float tethered to the pump at the bottom. You need to change the length of the tethering cord to the float so the float is not upside down until the water level is higher, or change the location where the tether is connected to the pump to maybe somewhere up on the vertical outlet pipe. Take the cover off the sump and look, it isn't all that complicated, not even close to rocket science.
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Do this. What is the make and model of the pump. Go to google, then click on "images" at the top, and find a picture of your pump. Post the URL of that picture so we can see how the thing looks and operates.
By the way: Top posting wont win you any favors on this newsgroup.
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On Apr 18, 7:45 am, snipped-for-privacy@internet.com wrote:

Agree. How can anyone know exactly what kind of pump he has? But one thing is likely. If it's intended to be adjustable, the instructions would say how to do so. He could also check the manufacturer's website for FAQ, etc.
Also, important questions are how much water it removes on each cycle compared to the old one? It could be running more because it removes less water each cycle. Or it could be running more because it's maintaing the water level lower than the old pump. If it's the latter and the float switch isn't adjustable, he could set the pump up higher.
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On 04/18/2013 05:30 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Have you never heard of Google? It took me all of about five seconds to find a picture of OPs pump, which wasn't really necessary because there are only a couple configurations for a sump pump, and OP described it perfectly well in his FIRST post (not to mention anyone who has looked at sump pumps knows what it probaby looks like anyway).
As an exercise, here is how you do it: go to Google, and do an image search on the following: "wayne sump pump", then report back, letting us know that you found it.
Jon
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wrote:

How do you know if the one you found is the one he has? He gave no model #. He could have a pump laying around from 25 years ago, and now he's decided to use it.

So, it's up to those trying to help the guy to use google to start doing research and then GUESS which pump he may or may not have and then formulate answers based on that? He's too lazy to give the specific model of the pump he has so he can get a proper answer, and you attack me?
And yeah, I know what sump pumps "probably" looks like. But probably isn't a very good way to address the problem.

Here's an excercise, kiss my ass moron. Feel free to use google to see what an ass may or may not look like. Pick the one that's "probably" the right one.
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On 04/18/2013 06:57 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Having a bad day today, are we?
Jon
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wrote:

Heh, you started it, by getting nasty with me over the fact that I agreed with another poster that the OP didn't even tell us what model pump he actually has. Just because you want to waste your time using google to find every model of pump it *might* be and then coming up with answers for each and every one you might find, doesn't mean that's what the rest of us have to do. Or that it's the most productive approach. IMO, if someone comes here looking for help, it's not too much to ask for them to at least state the actual model of the pump they have. How about it's not even a current model and could be one made 10 years ago that's been sitting around?
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Wayne pump model CDU800.
wrote in message wrote:

Heh, you started it, by getting nasty with me over the fact that I agreed with another poster that the OP didn't even tell us what model pump he actually has. Just because you want to waste your time using google to find every model of pump it *might* be and then coming up with answers for each and every one you might find, doesn't mean that's what the rest of us have to do. Or that it's the most productive approach. IMO, if someone comes here looking for help, it's not too much to ask for them to at least state the actual model of the pump they have. How about it's not even a current model and could be one made 10 years ago that's been sitting around?
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For the record... OP is clearly not very bright.
1) he top posts (for which I attempted to fix but probably messed it up)
2) the third post (mine) asked him if this was his pump:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
he replied (post ~5) to another post but never verified the model 'til ~post 14.
Hmmm.....
top poster & too stupid to verify or give model number >>>>> not worth the time to help
Flame war started & appears no positive solution consensus... oh well.
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amazing - anyone that has ever had a sump pump in the well, knows there is basically only 2 models - tether ball vs rod & ball and the OP described which one he has...
No wonder we are 27th in the world - geeshh
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27th in the world? If that's so, maybe it's because there are people like you who apparently think that simply having experience with one sump pump is all that it takes to establish that there are only two kinds of sump pumps in existence. That logic is about as flawed as it gets.
Oh, and I'm not through with you yet. From the other post you just made:
"I was kinda wondering the same thing. I've always had the "seaprate" tether, with the piggyback socket that the pump motor plugs into...
Not sure how you can handle adjusting the rod & ball, since there is nothing to make shorter vs longer - as with the tethered ball. "
So apparently you don't know much about sump pumps after all.
QED
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So apparently you don't know much about sump pumps after all.
QED
--
tnx for the enlightenment - about a minimalist design that has "no
adjustments"...
  Click to see the full signature.
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I didn't provide any "enlightenment" about a minimalist design or adustments. Never said anything that's even clost to that. You're so dumb you can't even follow a thread or who posted what.
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wrote:

I had the same problem with a Zoller M47 Pump. It would run every minute or so in the wet season. When the switch wore out and it would not shut off reliably, I purchased a dual float system and zip tied the flot to the on position. This system works by requiring both floats to raise before it turns on the pump, but it won't shut off until both are pointing down, This allowed me to split the on and off positions to allow more water to be in the crock between operation of the pump. This has worked for me well and now my pump runs normally and when it does, it runs for a longer period. The only drawback that I found was thay my crock, which is about 18". Dia. did not allow a lot of room for positioning of the floats. which attatch to the output pipe. If one of them hangs up, the pump will either not turn on or off when it is supposed to, so you have to make sure they are free to move up and down. Hope this helps.

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If it kicks on every minute...how long does it run?
is this the unit?
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Put a bit of weight around the circumference of the float so more of the float needs to be submerged for it to float up & hit the lever. Just make sure the float can still float...too much weight the float will remain completely submerged & never float.
Short cycling can indicate that the sump is a bit small in diameter compared to the flow rate into the sump.
cheers Bob
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I was kinda wondering the same thing. I've always had the "seaprate" tether, with the piggyback socket that the pump motor plugs into...
Not sure how you can handle adjusting the rod & ball, since there is nothing to make shorter vs longer - as with the tethered ball.

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