Subfloor question

Hey everyone!
Ok, here's the deal...just bought another house and we'll be closing at the end of the month. In checking the house out on the county's property home page I found something weird. I was comparing that house (price wise, space wise) to others in the same subdivision. In doing so, I noticed that our house appears to be the only one that shows: FLOOR SYSTEM: WOOD W/O SUBFLOOR. All of the others houses on that street (about 25 more) and the subdivision (probably 125 total) all indicate WOOD W/ SUBFLOOR.
As far as I know, the same builder built all of these homes, so why would this one be built any different? They all range in price from around $175K to $250+K, and even the homes cheaper than ours have a subfloor noted. Any chance that the property page is incorrect? I can't see why all the houses in the neighborhood wouldn't have this same setup. In fact, there a couple of other houses in the subdivision that look almost identical to ours, and they're listed with a subfloor. Is there a way I can check for a subfloor? The master bedroom is on the ground floor, and my wife and I do have a queen size waterbed. Would this be a problem if there is indeed no subfloor? We have not had the home inspection yet, but hope to schedule that for some time next week. Is this something I should ask him?
Now, in searching the net, I did find a post in a new group that indicated subflooring is often only used when hardwood floors are installed. This house doesn't have hardwood, it's carpet and tile, so if indeed it doesn't have a subfloor would that explain it?
If anyone can offer advise, and explain a subfloor I sure would appreciate it. Needless to say, since I don't know anything about this I'm freaking out and praying that I didn't buy a piece of crap that I'll go crashing through! :)
Tom
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Tom wrote:

Most new houses does not have sub floor. Just plywood and carpet or whatever on top. Some even uses OSB not even plywood. Tony
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Sub floor is a rough floor laid directly on the floor joists and serves as a base for the finish floor. The carpet and tile are undoubtedly laid over the equivalent of sub floor. To see what is there you need to look from below. If you have a crawl space, get the inspector to do that for you.
Tom Baker
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You may be dealing with specific definitions where you are located but generally speaking:
There is a sub-floor in all construction. There would be nothing to walk on if there was not a sub-floor. Generally it is not called a sub-floor unless they is another layer of wood or tile on top of it. Alas the carpet is often referred to as the finish floor by some. If you don't have any hardwood, just carpet over something I think you are getting what you chose to pay for and have nothing to worry about. 500K houses often have carpet over a single layer of 3/4" plywood or wafer-board decking.
For your peace of mind talk to the builder or agent and don't let "buyer's remorse" (O God what have I done?) destroy the enjoyment of your home purchase.
Best wishes
Colbyt
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To have a stable (rigid) floor I always look for at least a single layer of 1" of flooring under carpet, tile or finished wood. If it's accomplished by using two layers I prefer 1-1/8" as with 5/8" plywood layered with 1/2" plywood. I won't specify particle board since it gives a "mushier" feel than plywood.
My own home has a minimum of 1.5" thick flooring supported on 16" centers.
RB
Tom wrote:

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