Sub Panel wiring

I'm running a new 60amp sub panel and have been debating what wire to feed the sub panel with. I have 6/3 NM-B (75 deg) right now, NEC says this is good to 75 amps or so, but i must use the 60 degree rating of 55 amps. If both my double pole breaker and my lugs are rated for 75 degrees can i use this wire or should i just go to a 50 amp Sub.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Barry wrote:

You won't get unanimous agreement on this but, since 55 Amp is not a "standard" rating or setting, you are permitted to increase the breaker size up to the next standard rating (which happens to be 60 Amps). Art. 240-3 Excep #4
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

NEC article on NM cable explicitly limits it use to the 60C column for ampacity. You can use 90C for ambient temperature derating, but not ampacity. If your calculated load on the panel is 55A or less, then you can round up to the standard breaker size of 60A.
-- Mark Kent, WA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That makes sense. My sub is only using 2 circits for receptacles. Power tools and tread mill nothing industrial (no 5 saws at the same time, just basic home owner stuff)the reason I went with 60 amps is for future use for a bathroom and jacuzzi tub(1 1\2 hp at the most), all of which will never run 60 amps at one time. Since the breaker is there to protect the wire even if i did get to 60 amps the wire should still be ok since its rated at 75 amps (even thogh NEC states to use 55 amp). Ill just use the 60 amp breaker. Scince i did not know the reasoning for the use of 60 degree rating i was just concerned about using 60 amps even though its 5 extra amps i did not want the hose to burn down
Thanks Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

6-3???? You mean 6-4 do you not?
2 hots, a neutral and a ground will be needed for a sub panel unless all your loads from it are 240v.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SQLit wrote:

In US practice cable, as opposed to cord, is named by the number of current carrying insulated conductors. The presence of some form of Equipment Grounding (bonding) Conductor (EGC) is assumed. 6/3 would mean three insulated conductors plus an EGC that is sized for the maximum permissible ampacity of the current carrying conductors. The reason for this convention is that the nature of the EGC varies by cable type. In type NM it would be an uninsulated wire. In type AC it would be the jacket of the cable. In type MC it would be an insulated wire and so forth. 6/4 NM would have four insulated conductors and an uninsulated EGC. In the OPs application 6/3 w G would be the correct designation for the cable used to supply a feeder supplied, single phase, 120/240 volt, panel that is located in the same structure as the Over Current Protective Device (OCPD) that protects the feeder supplying the panel. -- Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.