Stuuborn leak on new bath sink tailpiece

I replaced a friends bathroom sink tailpiece yesterday and I am having problems with a leak in the pipe with fine threads that goes into the main body of the tailpipe. It is part RP 6128 in the pic below.
http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infplumb/i/infpop1.gif
When I first installed the tailpiece, it leaked. So I removed it and used teflon tape, still leaked. Then I used Rectorseal teflon pipe seal, still leaked.
So I thought maybe I have a defective pipe. So I got a new one,put it in, same thing, still leaks. Any ideas? I'm ready to put 5 minute Epoxy on this thing if i can't stop this leak.
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use silicone bathtub caulk, the stuff you put around the tub. be generous, and its easy to remove in the future but seals great.
I had a leaky toilet tank that leaked at the bolts just a little.
finally gave up and called a plumber/
he used the silicone goo, at first assembly.
no leaks:)
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Sometimes a factor in this is that it's either not tight enough or too tight. How are you tightening it up?
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wrote:

Just hand tight at first. When it leaked, I tightened it a bit more with a wrench, but not at the top where I could risk bending the pipe, but rather down at the bottom. I took the P-trap out and put my channel locks not around the pipe, but I grabbed the inner and outer part of the pipe and gave it a little twist.
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On 4/2/2013 7:54 AM, Mikepier wrote:

I'm also virtually certain after reading description below it's just not tight...

Tape and tighten--it's tapered thread so has to be tight. If it's chromed use a rag to keep from knicking the plating and use the force, luke...
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This is a thin pipe, it seems it will bend easy or become out of round if I use a lot of force on it, making the leak worse.
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On Tue, 2 Apr 2013 05:12:44 -0700 (PDT), Mikepier

Make sure the leak is not from the trip lever packing nut or fittings above.
--
Mr.E

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Mike,
Water flows down hill, so wrap each connection, one at a time, starting at the top with toilet paper, then run the water. This will help you locate the joint that's leaking. I'd look carefully at the pivot seat. Assuming that you are right and the mainbody/tailpiece joint is leaking, I'd return the mainbody. You've already eliminated the tailpiece as the cause of the leak. These are low pressure connections and should be easy to make leak-free unless something is broken or not tightened
Dave M.
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Sounds like it's leaking above the tailpiece, probably around RP23060. -----
- gpsman
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I see drops of water coming out of where the threaded pipe meets the main body. Not a lot, but enough to notice.
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Seems impossible, unless the downstream part of the P-trap is higher than where the tailpiece joins it... or your tailpiece doesn't extend sufficiently into the P-trap.
You've taped a joint that doesn't need taping and still your leak persists. Something is wrong, and it can't be gravity. -----
- gpsman
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If it were me, I would:
A) Wrap those fine threads with teflon tape and then tighten the joint. I realize they're not tapered threads, but the teflon tape will at least stop the leak.
B) Next time use a WALTEC tail piece. Waltec taile pieces are a single piece unit that can't leak. They use a big rubber washer at the bottom of the sink which can be difficult to put on if you don't know to use silicone caulk as a lubricant when assembling the tail piece onto the sink. If you slather up that Waltec tail piece with silicone caulk, you can slide that rubber washer on no problem.
--
nestork


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As nestork points out....
tail piece threads are not tapered threads and as such, the joint is not meant for tape.
BUT tape can sometimes work in these situations. I had a stubborn tail piece installation and used heavy silicone vacuum grease to seal it.
An alternative that would work... RectorSeal #2 Soft Set But I think #2 is no longer available, replaced by #2 Plus Teflon (everything's gotta have teflon in it!)
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On 4/2/2013 5:12 AM, Mikepier wrote:

tape isn't generally used to make it seal, but to make it slippery so yo can tighten it some more. they make a sealant putty for this.
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On Tuesday, April 2, 2013 1:24:37 PM UTC-4, chaniarts wrote:

h fine threads that goes into the > main body of the tailpipe. It is part R P 6128 in the pic below. > http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infplumb/i/in fpop1.gif > > When I first installed the tailpiece, it leaked. So I removed it and > used teflon tape, still leaked. Then I used Rectorseal teflon pip e > seal, still leaked. > > So I thought maybe I have a defective pipe. So I got a new one,put it > in, same thing, still leaks. Any ideas? I'm ready to put 5 minute > Epoxy on this thing if i can't stop this leak. > tape isn 't generally used to make it seal, but to make it slippery so yo can tighte n it some more. they make a sealant putty for this.
Lowes has a teflon sealer that is a white thick liquid in a can with a brus h. Can sized about like the pvc glue. Works pretty well for me in these s ituations.
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Please stop repeating that "suburban legend".
Tape IS for sealing, it's meant to take up the "designed in" clearance between internal & external tapered threads.
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Double check that it's not the large flange and rubber seal that's mated to the sink itself. It may be leaking there and then running down the tailpipe to give you a false sense of where the leak actually lies.
On Tuesday, April 2, 2013 8:12:44 AM UTC-4, Mikepier wrote:

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On Sat, 13 Dec 2014 09:05:13 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Your problem is not uncommon. I worked as a plumber for quite a few years. Those fine threads were a common source of trouble. I often wondered why they designed them like that. Anyhow, there is a simple solution. Make sure both pieces are dry. Then put a thick coating of silicone caulk on both the male and female threads, and tighten it firmly. Let the silicone dry before running water or disturbing that pipe, for at least an hour.
PROBLEM SOLVED!
By the way: The epoxy will probably work too, but you'll never be able to take it apart again. With the silicone, you can unscrew it, but not easily. But it's unlikely you'll even need to unscrew it anyhow. By that time, you'll probably replace it again.
One final thought. Pipe threads such as on a steel pipe, have a taper to them, which is why they seal as they are tightened. Those fine threads on those drain pipes have no taper. It's poor design! It should say on the package to use silicone. (Or be re-designed at the factory).
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| Double check that it's not the large flange and rubber seal that's mated to the sink itself. It may be leaking there and then running down the tailpipe to give you a false sense of where the leak actually lies. | | On Tuesday, April 2, 2013 8:12:44 AM UTC-4, Mikepier wrote:
Do you suppose that Mikepier is still waitnig for an answer, some 20 months after he worked on the sink. In that case you should probably also tell him how to repair the floor. :)
You might also want to get a real newsreader and stop using Google Groups, so that you can see the actual current discussions.
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