Stupid Home Repair Shows

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On Jan 15, 12:44 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That's interesting. A 42" Panasonic plasma has a rated power consumption of 286 watts. I'm not sure how they figure that stuff - would that be only when a completely white screen was displayed?
R
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On Sat, 15 Jan 2011 13:23:12 -0800 (PST), RicodJour

That would appear to be correct - worst case current draw.
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On Jan 15, 5:02 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Okay, thanks. I can't wait until we get CFL TVs. I'd love to have some extra time to get snacks and beverages while the TV is warming up. ;)
R
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While simultaneously producing maximum audio volume.
--
When the game is over, the pawn and the king are returned to the same box.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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wrote:

That is because older early model plasma TVs were like toaster ovens. I was at a trade show, where we had to wait for the next demonstration in a long hallway that was lined on both sides with plasma TVs when they first came out. It was like the inside of an oven, you could feel the radiant heat from the screen on your skin much like a tropical sun burning your skin. They have improved them greatly now, the heat from the screens is minimal.
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On 1/15/2011 3:09 PM, EXT wrote:

That explains the lower wattage ratings others have posted. My daughters TV has 5 or 6 fans across the top of it to help it stay cool.
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Mine has fans across the top, too. I didn't notice them until the service tech opened the thing up to replace the power supply. They're *really* quiet. Must not be turning very fast at all.
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Our 46" plasma runs right around 500W. The room is big enough that 500W isn't enough to heat it appreciably, though.
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?

My LG 47" LCD runs 241 watts according to their web site. I also found they no longer list the consumption on TV aside from standby that is 0.3 watts. So, I checked Samsung to see what they offered. They just state it exceeds Energy Star compliance: Approval by Energy Star, a government program, ensures TV is eco-friendly and energy efficient.
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On Jan 14, 6:41 pm, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

The heat sinks in electronic devices are meant to conduct heat away from the chipsets, which are very small and where the heat is generated. That is totally different from heat from outside entering the electronic device causing a problem.
Code limits how close a wood fireplace mantel can be to the fireplace opening based on the size of the opening and the projection of the mantel into the room. Assuming that there is a mantel, it does meet Code, and it doesn't catch on fire frequently, if you are that concerned about melting plastic on the TV, above the mantel, I'd be more concerned about getting out of the house because it's on fire. Check it out - throw a thermometer on top of your mantel and fire up the fireplace. Get it good and hot. You'll see that your imagination is running away with you.
Fireplaces throw heat out more than they do straight up, and the people in that room would be sitting in their underwear sweating bullets before the thermometer registered 100 F. In other words, a hot summer day without AC.
I was surprised by the number of posters who commented on the viewing angle being a pain in the neck, and I suppose it would be if the furniture and/or person's typical viewing position is erect. When I'm watching TV I'm usually on my way to horizontal. I have my feet up on the coffee table and my neck is supported by the back of the couch. When I'm sitting like that when I look straight ahead I'm looking dead center of the screen.
A lot of people with the TVs above the fireplace get those double recliner couches, and that's just about the most comfortable way to watch TV there is. You can't watch a low down TV comfortably in one of those recliners, least I can't, as the angle now makes me crane my head forward, and that does bother my neck. And the higher the TV (within reason), the more people can more easily see the TV, which may or may not be an issue for some people.
But don't take my word for it, use one of the online viewing angle calculators, or check out an AV forum, such as: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1052262
As far as the soot that people mentioned, again, if you have a mantel then it's not really a concern. I've never seen soot that curled up and around and back to the wall above a fireplace. If you're having that much soot, or really any appreciable soot at all, then there are issues with the chimney's draw and/or the size of the fire that is being built, and those should be remedied as they are potentially serious problems whereas a TV's location is not.
R
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On 1/15/2011 1:35 AM, RicodJour wrote:

That is half true. If the ambient temperature is higher than the specs listed for the TV you will put a strain on the unit, and void any warranty. Most all electronic appliances, like a TV, have a low and high ambient temperature in their specs. If you exceed that temperature you put a strain on the electronics because the heat sink won't do its job.
Ambient temperature matters. I just grabbed the first manual I could find in the manual folder and it's for a DVD player. Specs. say the ambient temperature range is 41ºF to 95ºF. The temp above a fireplace can surely go over 95ºF.
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Void any warranty...? Huh? Is there some sort of temperature sensor in a TV with the ability to record the temperature? If you live in a hot climate, are all warranties void? That makes no sense.
As far as the strain, I've had roaring fires and ambient temperatures over 100 F and there's no picture breakup or anything like that (frankly, not even sure how a high temperature would affect a TV - not really sure what would happen). I'm not arguing that the TV is immune to temperature, just that the people would be affected more than the TV would.
And we're talking about TVs, not DVD players, right? Here's what I pulled off of Panasonic's site: For a 50" Plasma TV Operating Temperature     32°F - 104°F (0°C - 40°C) For a 42" LCD TV No operating temperature listed
Interesting, no?
R
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On 1/15/2011 4:18 PM, RicodJour wrote:

Interesting yes. I'm not sure what point you are trying to make? It appears you are saying to ignore the factory operating temperature specs? Well hell yes, we can all go over the factory specs on most everything we own without immediate damage. The manufactures don't advise it, I don't advise it, you seem to believe that it doesn't matter. Whatever. It's your choice.
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No, Tony, I am saying that people are imaging there will be a heat issue affecting the TV over the fireplace in some noticeable way, the same way that they are imaging that the viewing angle is always uncomfortable with it up there.
I have never heard of a heat issue with a TV above the fireplace, have you? Here's a thread of three years duration, and there's no mention of actual heat related problems, only WAGs that there would be a problem. http://www.thathomesite.com/forums/load/homeentertain/msg0219112810437.html It's interesting (I know, I find a lot of things interesting!) that that thread started off almost the exact same way as this one, with the same concerns and assumptions, and nowhere in there is a mention of heat-related damage to the TV. There are many other threads with essentially the same information, but I chose that one to post as it was over a long time frame and addressed the same questions that were brought up here.
I would not hang a TV over a wood stove, a vent-free gas fireplace or over a fireplace that did not have a projecting mantel, or if the fireplace is more or less constantly on in the winter. The surest way to determine if it is safe enough for the new TV is to test the ambient temperature above the fireplace with a thermometer while a roaring fire is going. Anything else is guessing.
R
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On 1/15/2011 4:18 PM, RicodJour wrote:

No, Your are just delivering the usual "see it works" comment when operating something outside of spec which totally neglects any long term effects.
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