stupid electrical action

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I was in the process of trying out some pushbutton receptacles to my floor lamp light section, always making sure pulling out the wire from the wall o utlet before doing this when i attach the 2 wires to it. I must have tried this at least a half dozen times, always making sure about the wire plug. Finally, at the last attempt, i got the proper fit and added the bulb, turn the little switch on the wire to test if the connections worked. It did, a nd then to my surprise, I noticed that last time I did not bother to ever r emove that wire from the outlet. I thought, how come I did not get electroc uted or at the least some shocked?
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On 10/27/2015 11:58 AM, Frank wrote:

The only way you'd get a shock would have been if you had touched both the "hot" wire and the ground or "cold" wire.
A complete circuit is necessary.
Had you touched both, you would have gotten a jolt.
Though not too many people get killed in the process it's a mistake to think 115vac is safe. I've heard of people getting killed.
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On 10/27/2015 9:58 AM, Frank wrote:

There must exist a path for the electricity to flow *through* your body (or, some PART of your body). I.e., a place where it comes *in* and a place where it goes *out*.
The easy way to get a shock is to let *both* wires come in contact with your body. Note that one of the wires (the "neutral") is (theoretically) bonded to the "safety ground" (third wire) back in your electrical panel. So, you *should* be able to hold this wire and the "safety ground" with no problem.
However, there is often a "potential" (voltage) across these two (technical reasons not worth describing here). And, the safety ground may *not* be connected properly. Finally, the "hot" and "neutral" wires may be swapped, incorrectly. Bottom line, do not try this. :>
(there are other ways this can fail)
Because the neutral is connected to the safety ground (earth), grabbing the *hot* and touching anything that is also connected to "earth" (e.g., a water pipe) is effectively the same as grabbing hot and safety ground (which we said was the same as hot and *neutral*) so you'll get a shock.
Depending on the type of soil you have (and how recently it has rained, etc.) standing barefoot on the dirt can have your feet acting like a connection to "earth" so letting any part of your body touch "hot" will result in a shock.
To get a shock, you need enough electrical potential (voltage) to overcome the resistance of your skin. Typically, this is about 40 volts. As such, 110VAC qualifies!
[Note that you can get a tingle from a 9V battery if you hold it to your tongue as there is far less resistance to overcome at your moist tongue than at your dry hands!]
But, the voltage isn't what kills. Rather, it is the current -- the "amount" of electricity (flow rate) passing through your body (from the "in" point to the "out" point). If your *heart* happens to be along this path, then, chances are, it will stop beating and that will be the cause of death. One technique to minimize the chance of this sort of path developing (assuming you are wearing insulated shoes) is to keep one hand in your pocket while working on electrics; with just one hand exposed to an electric circuit, there's less chance of the "second point" being established for the current to flow *through* your body (esp if that second point was YOUR OTHER HAND -- with heart directly between them!).
[I.e., with one contact point, you're a bird perched on a high tension wire -- safely!]
The length of time that you are exposed to the current also plays a factor. For events where you *can* dislodge yourself (i.e., pull your hand away from the "shock"), there is typically less risk than for events where the muscles involuntarily contract, grabbing the conductor even tighter (so the shock persists indefinitely)
If very high currents are involved (like grabbing onto a "high tension" wire), then your flesh will actually *cook*.
Currents as low as 30mA (AC) can lead to fibrilation and, thus, death. AC is harder for the body to cope with -- and our 60Hz is a particularly bad frequency, in that regard. By contrast, DC currents need to be considerably higher (an order of magnitude) to be of significant concern.
[GFCI devices are designed to measure the amount of current going "out" one conductor and returning back "in" through the other. Any imbalance means there must have been some OTHER path for the electricity to follow -- most likely through some *body*. This "imbalance" is what causes them to trip.]
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On 10/27/2015 2:26 PM, Don Y wrote:

I favor the "working on the neutral side" theory.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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wrote:

Just curious why 60hz is particularly bad, and where you got this onfo?
I believe a welder (stick welder) operates at around 24v. I learned real quickly that it can really tingle if a person is standing on wet soil, and the shoes are damp. It's Low voltage, but it still can zap a person. I always stand on a piece of dry plywood if I weld outdoors now, (if the soil is damp or wet).

I have a bucket heater, which is merely a 115v heating element, which is similar to a smallish water heater element. I have used this thing for years to heat a small amount of water. But I can not use it on a GFCI. Even though the water is in a plastic bucket on a dry floor, it trips the GFCI within seconds. I've learned to just plug it into a standard outlet, and it works fine. Obviously there some electrical leakage in this device, so I know not to stick my hand in the water to see how hot the water is, without unplugging it first. Even if I'm on a dry floor, and not touching any sort of ground with my other hand or another body part.
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On 10/27/2015 12:58 PM, Frank wrote:

button receptacles to my floor lamp light section, always making sure pulling out the wire from the wall outlet before doing this when i attach the 2 wires to it. I must have tried this at least a half dozen times, always making sure about the wire plug. Finally, at the last attempt, i got the proper fit and added the bulb, turn the little switch on the wire to test if the connections worked. It did, and then to my surprise, I noticed that last time I did not bother to ever remove that wire from the outlet. I thought, how come I did not get electrocuted or at the least some shocked?

Just a guess. If the bulb was out, and the switch was on the neutral side, you might not have been working on a hot wire.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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What is a pushbutton receptacle? Never heard of it/them! You should never pull a wire from any outlet, you pull the plug that the wires are attached to if you want to disconnect the electricity from an outlet.
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On 10/27/2015 02:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

I wondered too...possibly a GFI outlet ?
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On Wednesday, October 28, 2015 at 7:59:05 AM UTC-4, philo wrote:

Thanks guys..as for what is a pushbutton receptacle....Its been around for years and used mostly on lamps. You either turn it off/on. There are also ones that have a small chain. If your still not familiar...google it.
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On 10/29/2015 7:08 PM, Frank wrote:

receptacle....Its been around for years and used mostly on lamps. You either turn it off/on. There are also ones that have a small chain. If your still not familiar...google it.

Receptacle, synonym with socket. A couple holes, typically flat holes, used to power a plug.
What about my still not familiar? If my not familar.... what?
If you're still not sure of the definition of "receptacle", please google it.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 10/29/2015 7:08 PM, Frank wrote:

Does this receptacle look like yours? http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photography-electric-outlet-wall-socket-plug-receptacle-image7529752
No push buttons.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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wrote:

That is a pushbutton SOCKET.
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On 10/29/2015 9:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Clare, I'm glad that for once I can correct YOU.
The term you are seeking is "switch". As in, push button SWITCH.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Thu, 29 Oct 2015 21:47:20 -0400, Stormin Mormon

No, on a lamp the pull chain, push button, or twist key IS the switch, but it is part of the socket. The OP said ".Its been around for years and used mostly on lamps" and he called it a "receptacle".
He's talking about the lamp socket or "socket lamp holder". Look at: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-Push-Button-Socket-Lamp-Holder-R50-06098-0PG/100357000
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On 10/29/2015 11:07 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Push button refers to switch, which can be within a receptacle/socket.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Friday, October 30, 2015 at 9:58:45 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I think it's clear now, the push button is on the lamp holder, where the bulb goes.
Whether there is another switch in the lamp cord is not solved yet but it would explain the situation.
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On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 09:58:40 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Did you ever see one in a "receptacle" (not lamp socket) in a lamp?????
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On 10/30/2015 3:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Sure, we had them all over the house when I was a kid.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Sat, 31 Oct 2015 08:10:37 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Every outlet in my house in Zambia had a switch on it -just like most in Britain did years ago. Something about the outlets beeing "leaky" or the electricity being "fluid" or something strange like that in the Limey mind I guess., but I've never seen outlets with switches on them in anything newer than about 1928 in North America.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

Another one for Stumpy
--
Tekkie

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