Studs on basement wall.

I am planning on building a family room in the basement of our new home. As basements go this one is likely to be quite dry. The basement is only half deep in the surrounding grade and the land is a mixture of sand and rock. During heavy rains this land drains very quickly. Following advice from this NG I shall use pressure treated 2"x4"s for walls against the basement walls and for sole plates. I want to insulate between the studs set against the basement walls.
What kind of fiber glass should I use for insulation? Is aluminum foil backed fiber glass still available?
Also should I attempt to seal the floor against damp before installing carpeting? If so, what should I use? Paint, plastic membrane, other, etc?
Peter.
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I did not use pressure treated wood to stud up against a basement wall and never had any trouble, also used fiber glass insulation between the studs. Regarding the cement floor--moisture will come up through the floor and go through any carpeting with no ill effect. Be careful how you try to seal it. I would not use any plastic membrane because vapor will get trapped under the plastic and you'll end up with water there. I had carpeting on the cement floor with a good pad and never had a moisture problem. MLD

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Not to change gears on you but why are you using pt for wall studs? Do you want chemically treated wood in your house? Have you given thought to steel studs. I used them in some framing I did and they are a real treat. They have their own issues but for framing, they're great. You could also use regular lumber with a membrane below for the sill.
As to your flooring question, I believe there is an underpadding that has a moisture barrier built into it. The best way is to raise the floor (if you have room) by laying 2x4's flat and covering with plywood. You can also insulate between the studs to make the floor more comfortable.
You may also consider a new product that looks kind of like egg carton made of pvc. It allows water and air to flow around the product and keeps it away from the flooring. You can buy rolls of the stuff and cover it with plywood or you can buy ready made (plywood with this stuff glued to the bottom) 2' x 2' squares that fit together. The only thing with the ready made jobs is that you have to build your walls on top of them if you are going to put carpet down (otherwise they won't stay down when you stretch your carpet!).
Good luck

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wrote:

Not necessary to use PT for the studs. They should be half an inch or so from the concrete walls. Not necessary to use PT for the sole plate. In northern climates, general practice is to install a moisture barrier behind the studs and under the bottom plate, beginning at ground level or four feet whichever is the lesser..

Standard fibreglass insulation is fine. Then a vapour barrier floor to ceiling.

General practice here is to carpet directly onto the concrete. Usually an eight to ten pound pad and a 32 oz or higher berber.
Ken
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@adelphia.net says...

Your local codes may require treated wood for the bottom plate, touching concrete. Do not set the studs directly against the wall--the wall may not be plumb or square, and concrete always transmits some moisture from the earth that can wick into the wood. Set the stud wall an inch or so from the exterior concrete wall, and make sure the stud wall is independently plumb and square.
You also don't want the insulation directly against the concrete for the same reasons of moisture wicking. If you use kraft paper backed insulation, you'll staple its edges to the front of the studs.
Don't overlook the possibility of steel studs. They do have some differences and disadvantages, but also some powerful advantages. After all is said and done, I believe they are superior to wood for basement finishing.
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