stuck washer spigot

I just bought new washer. Delivery man couldn't get hoses off. I have read on here to use liquid wrench etc. I want to know how to apply it. My husband is out of state and I am trying to help myself before calling plumber.. are there any videos to watch? Thanks
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On Sunday, January 11, 2015 at 4:44:05 PM UTC-6, charlene wrote:

For the hoses you need Channel-Locks...as for spigot/valve, use some WD or LW on the valve stem where it enters the packing seal. Hope that makes sense!
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On Sunday, January 11, 2015 at 5:54:01 PM UTC-5, bob_villa wrote:

Just recently with hoses and valves on for over 20 years I had no choice to replace the valves hoses and lots of other stuff.
If the new washer is going anywhere that a flood could damage stuff the OP might be far better off calling a plumber.
My stuff was like welded together after all those years...
In fact I ended up cutting hoses off with a sawzall, cutting a coulple vlves off, and taking the frozen togeter parts to a buddy with a commercial vise.
boy was he surprised he couldnt get them apart either.... he was stunned
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bob_villa wrote:

Or soaking with some CLR if water is hard.
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Couldn't get the hoses off the water faucets?
Or couldn't get them off the old washing machine?
Based on the subject line -- one should never put important information only in the subject line, where it may be ignored. -- I guess you mean the first.
So why not take them off the old washing machine and put them back on the new washing machine? Change the rubber washer in the hose end first. They sell them separately in the garden department.

Why not call your husband?
Are both hoses stuck on?
Liquid wrench might help, but it might make it worse if someone is gonig to to use a torch later**. I would use longer pliers, Waterpump pliers, also called Channel-loc(k) pliers, maybe 10 or 12 inches long, but you'll have a tremendous grip with them and you don't want to squeeze so hard you crack the faucet, just enough that the pliers hold very firmly to the hose end. Once you have a good grip, start moving your hand in an orbit around the hose end, so that you're unscrewing it. Make sure you're going in the right direction, and arne't confused because, for example, the faucet points down and you're looking at it from above. OTOH, Bob H.'s story shows that you might not be able to get it at all.
**If I were bound and determined to take the hoses off the faucets, I think I'd heat the metal faucet with a propane or MAPP torch, and let the heat reach to the part of the hose that is screwed on to the faucet.
Unless you've used a torch before and know how hot they are and how much heat the metal absorbs, I don't think you want to do that yourself.
GO TO A LAUNDRAMAT UNTIL YOUR HUSBAND GETS HOME.

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replying to micky , Charlene wrote:

Would it be ok to leave the ones connected to the faucet on and just connect them to the new washer? If it won't cause damage I can do that easily...the ones that were connected to old washer came off easily. Just need to find out what size ( if they come in sizes) to purchase! I was told new hoses had to be put on....but that was probably to sell the hoses!!
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On Sunday, January 11, 2015 at 9:44:05 PM UTC-6, Charlene wrote:

You can't disconnect them unless you shut the water pressure off...either at the valves or a main shut-off. Even shut-off it will spray until the pressure is relieved.
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On Sunday, January 11, 2015 at 6:41:07 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

Not changing the supply hoses on an old washer when replacing it with a new one is a real bad idea. Especially if they're just the typical rubber type ones.
And before starting to use channel locks on the spigot ends or probably even before taking off the hoses, I'd make sure where the main supply valve for the house is located, that it can shut off the water if need be, just in case.
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It was a mistake. I thought I went back to the OP and didn't know I hadn't until just now.

Sorry, buit I'm sure she saw them in your own post.

I don't have a kid to yell at.
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On Mon, 12 Jan 2015 03:44:01 +0000, Charlene

You should replace the hoses but if all you can do now is put the old hoses on the new machine, it wont harm anything. Those old hoses could last years, but it's still best to replace them. If you want to do laundry now, just swap the old hoses. You might need new hose washers though (any hardware store has em).
When your husband gets home, have him use a pipe wrench on the old hoses at the spigot. You can soak with WD40 at the top edge of he hose at the spigot. If he cant do it that way. Cut off the rubber part of the old hose, and use a propane torch to heat the connector. If that dont do it, the spigots may need to be replaced. However I have never run into a hose that cant be taken off with a good pipe wrench and last resort the torch.
As for hose size, just measure from spigots to hose connectors on washer and get that size of the next longer. Of your old ones reach, just measure them. The hose ends are all standard, it's just the length that matters. When you buy new hoses, it's always nice to buy a red and blue if they have them. Then you know which is hot (red). But some places only sell black ones.
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replying to Jerry.Tan , charlene wrote:

-------------------------------
Thanks The ones I purchased with washer are red and blue. I sprayed some WD40 where the hose screws on but it (spigot) is in such a funny position it is hard to get the spray can where i think it needs to go... it isnt down like a regular faucet is. the hoses connect straight into the wall if you can picture what i am trying to say. I think it would be easier using the smaller can of oil i use when my sewing machine needs oil. Would that oil work just as well?
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On Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 12:44:06 AM UTC-5, charlene wrote:

A penetrating, thin type oil is going to work better. Has anyone even tried to get them off with a pair of channel locks? What did the delivery guy do? I would think he would have suitable pliers, but then you never know.....
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On Monday, January 12, 2015 at 2:04:07 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I agree, it's OK to use them temporarily. But unless they are only a few years old, they should be replaced. I'm betting they are plenty old, which is why they won't come off. If they fail, the results can be catastophic, depending on where the washer is located.
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On Tue, 13 Jan 2015 05:44:02 +0000, charlene

Oh, you got one of those special faucets made for laundry hoses, and the hose ends are almost in a small box inside the wall. (Stupid design). You may be able to get in there with plyers, or buy some curved tip plyers (the tip is bent 90 degrees). I can see why the delivery guys did not want to mess with it. THe best penetrating oil is called PB Blaster. (better than WD40). Just soak the hose ends with either WD40 or buy some PB Blaster. Let it sit for a day and spray again.
I'd buy the PB Blaster and a bent plyers and go at it. Still cheaper than calling a plumber. Especially if that spigot is in an finished wall, which it sounds like it is. Some of that stuff can be a real pain!
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On Mon, 12 Jan 2015 03:44:01 +0000, Charlene

Obviously, you're not asking me. You're looking for confirmation of my statement. Let me explain some more.
Rubber hoses get old and eventually burst. The guy at the hardware store explained that to me the day after one of mine burst. (I heard water running in the pipe when I woke up in the morning, before I had used water or flushed the toilet. Went to the washing machine and that's where it was spraying all over the floor.
But there is no particular reason the hoses have to be changed when you buy a new washing machine. However it might be the policy of the delivery company not to connect with the old hoses so they don't get blamed if a hose bursts, even coincidentally, soon after they were there. OTOH, if you don't change the hoses now, when will you, 15 years from now?
YOU ARE ACTUALLY SUPPOSED TO TURN OFF THE WATER, AFTER EVERY TIME YOU FINISH USING THE MACHINE. Look in the owners manual of the machine and it says that . It said that in the manual of your previous machine too. Most poeple don't, but if they did, the hose would not burst when they were asleep, at work, or out of town, because the water faucets woudl be turned off then.
If you are not going to turn the water off every time you finish using the machine, you should get steel clad hoses, that are covered in woven stainless?? steel. The cover generally limits how much the hose stretches when the valves in the machine suddenly turn the water off. I believe those hoses will last a lot longer, but I'm told they will spring leaks too (leaks under pressure, from the city water company, or whatever pressure you see when you turn on a faucet.)
You know there are electrically controlled water valves in the washing machine, because they are the reason when you set the water level for medium, the water doesnt just keep filling and filling and filling until it pours over the basket and on the floor. But when the electric vavles snap shut, it puts extra pressure on the hose the valve is connected to. This might also be true -- I'm not sure -- when you turn off a sink or when a toilet valve shuts off the water after the toilet is filled.
One more thing. Have you heard of water hammer? It's probably in wikipedia. It's the rattling and noise the water pipes sometimes make when flowing water is stopped by closing a valve. When you have all-rubber hoses, the hoses expand for a split second and take up the shock of the water turning off. (My next door neighbor told me that when he replaced the whole-house pressure regulator, and thus lowered the water pressure from what the city provides, that got rid of his water hammer)
My situation was the reverse When I got the steel-clad washing machine hoses, the hoses were not able to expand when I or the toilet or the washing machine suddently turned off the water, and I got water hammer. I cured this by buying at a hardware store a "water hammer arrestor" or something like that. It's a copper tube about 6" long with both garden hose fittings at one end so it can be screwed on between the washing machine hose and the washing machine. The tube is full of air, separated from the water by a rubber diaphragm. The diaphragm moves when the water is turned off and takes up the shock. Some day the diaphragm will rupture and within a few weeks after that the air will be absorbed by the water, and then the hammer will be back. But I've been using one or two of them (cold, or cold and hot) for 20 years and everything is fine so far.
So you may have to buy one or two of these things if you use the steel-clad hoses, which you should definitely use even if you plan to turn the water off every time you're not using the machine, because you're bound to forget to do that sometimes. Or get tired of doing it.
Get yourself a spare address, or mung your real address, so I could have emailed you a copy of this. Reply by post, please.

They only come in garden hose size. If you mean the length, they should be long enough that you can pull the machine away from the wall and get behind it to work on it while it's still connected. IOW, whatever length is there now is probably fine.

It was to avoid liability in case your hoses sprang a leak soon after his doing this. Assuming he was an employee and an agent of a company selling washing machines, and not just an "ignorant"** delivery man doing you a favor by connecting the hoses, It probably would have been negligent for him not to tell you you should change the hoses, but some people would deny they were told and that they told the delivery man to use the old hoses anhow, and say instead he just negligently put on old hoses. People like that have made it hard for the rest of us.
**Even if he gave no reason to think he knew about plumbing, some people would still sue for damage caused by a coincidental leak.
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