Stuck screws

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I have one of those!
Did you know that early vaccum cleaners, for cleaning carpets, were hand powered? They had to be pumped.
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On 11/14/14, 10:09 PM, micky wrote:

That must have sucked! :)
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It was a rental, but I put in a grab bar for my 80-year old mother, at the entrance to the bathtub, iirc.
Not in the tile but the stud just outside it. I wanted to be positive it didn't come out when she pulled on it. After she died, it took a long time to get the screws out. I had to push and twist and I damaged the slot, but I did get it without special tools. I guess I woudl have used a bit a 32" or even a 16th" size bigger if I'd known, but better safe than sorry.
I continued to pay the rent until I moved everything out and cleaned the place up, but one month I didn't tell them in a timely manner and they rented her appartment to someone else. When I found out they said, No Problem. We'll tell the new tenants it's not available after all and push them into aother apartment. And they did. One time I was there on a Saturday night and one of the other five apartments was having a party. A black woman came down and looked and I sold her my mother's whole bedroom suite for 50 dollars. It was the last thing keeping me from moving out. Soldi mahogany, matching end tables, dresser, chest, and two single beds hinged on the outside to the same backboard. I don't think they made king size mattresses in 1945. Now it was 1996. She knew she was getting a bargain -- it was still in very good condition and any flaws couold probably have been repaired. nd was very appreciative.
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'N8N[_2_ Wrote: > ;3308556']

> impact driver recently when the shop foreman at my friend's shop came to > my rescue when I busted my last #3 phillips bit (I didn't have my snap > on set with me so I was using a less expensive Lisle one) trying to > remove a stubborn rotor screw with a hand impact.

> ludicrously expensive but whereas the SO hand impact and a hand sledge > makes an impossible job doable but difficult the shake-n-break made the > same job trivial.

On the Wivco web site, it says that the Shake-N-Break tool uses 5/16 inch driver bits.
'WIVCO Design - Invents and manufactures body and fender hand tools of unique design and application (Shake-N-Break)' (http://www.wivco.com/shake_n_break.htm )
The only driver bits I've ever seen are 1/4 inch.
Are 5/16 inch driver bits standared in auto body repair tools, or does this mean you also have to buy Wivco driver bits to use with their tool?
--
nestork


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On Saturday, November 15, 2014 12:17:11 PM UTC-5, nestork wrote:

o

I dunno... I'm thinking the bits that came with my Lisle set were larger t han 1/4" though. Maybe they are 5/16". The Snap-On ones are 3/8" square d rive, they don't use a holder (each bit comes with its own "socket" if you will.) Don't have the Lisle bits handy to measure, they're at my friend's shop ATM.
nate
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'N8N[_2_ Wrote: > ;3309081']

> larger than 1/4" though. Maybe they are 5/16".

I think I've got it figured out.
Screw driver bits that come mounted on a 3/8 inch drive SOCKET will typically be 5/16 inch hex. I measured some of my 3/8 inch drive Torx driver bits and they were all 5/16 inch hex. You can pull them out of their 3/8 inch drive socket and put them into a 5/16 inch 1/4 inch drive socket for applications where you just don't need as much force.
http://tinyurl.com/qehoctw
The removable driver bit in the above socket will fit a 5/16 inch hex socket.
--
nestork


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Try E-Z Grip friction drops. You apply a drop of this to the tip of your sc rewdriver and it greatly increases the gripping power without stripping out the head of the screw. I've had a bottle of this on the shelf for many yea rs and it comes in real handy for stuck screws. Also works to increase the gripping power of a wrench on nuts. I haven't seen it in stores, but it is available online.
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They pretty much stopped selling screw on tips, that fit my elements. In favor of screw-in tips. I stocked up somewhat, plus I have those two Wens and I think something else. I'd sure hate to have to buy an expensive iron a month before I die, but otoh, if I had the money, at that point there'd be no point in saving it.

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Nope.
--
?Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive,
but what they conceal is vital.?
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On 11/18/2014 7:29 AM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

Man, that stucks. You're screwed.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Tuesday, November 18, 2014 8:13:10 AM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I'm surprised he didn't bolt from the discussion. He must be nuts.
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On 11/18/2014 8:18 AM, TimR wrote:

This is a good thread, a bit coarse at times.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 11/18/14, 8:13 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

At my workbench, I used to have a lot of trouble with stuck screws until I put up a mirror. Then the sweep second hand on the clock on the wall behind me reminded me which way to turn the screwdriver.
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On 11/18/14, 7:29 AM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

Can't you budget an impact driver or a thermostatic soldering station?
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wrote:

Not for two screws, no. I got the rest of them out okay.
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but what they conceal is vital.?
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On 11/18/2014 2:18 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

Perhaps you have a friend who can loan you one, or come over and do it for you?
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 11/18/14, 2:29 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I've never been able to get a screw loose unless I could budget.
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I already checked the neighbors and nobody has an impact driver (or at least will cop to it while I'm around). The soldering station seemed like too much work.
--
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but what they conceal is vital.?
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On 11/18/2014 4:32 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

Plan C would be to say hell with the brass handles, and do the whole thing in white latex paint. Real men use white latex.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 11/18/14, 4:32 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

I just like the word "budget" when I think about stuck screws. I was kind of fooling about soldering irons, building on Stormy's quote about a red hot nail.
I've got a couple of the kind of impact drivers you hammer. I remember one of them once budgeted a #3 Phillips loose on a car door hinge.
Mostly, I believe in long screwdrivers that fit screws just right. In 1972, I was having a lot of trouble with screws that wouldn't budget because of a reaction between alloys. I bought a 5/16" Bonney flat blade, 9-1/2" overall, with a square shank. I could apply far more torque with that than with other screwdrivers. I used a sharpening stone to maintain a perfect fit.
For tough #2 Phillips, I got a Craftsman, 11-1/2" overall.
For all those other kinds of screw heads, I've got one kit with 32 assorted bits and another with 24. They didn't cost much. I can usually find a perfect fit, and there's an extension. A long shaft helps me keep everything straight and apply a lot of pressure as well as torque. Besides preventing slips, pressure can ease the tension on the threads.
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