Stubborn hose bib


Have a hose bib that needs to be replaced. Problem is it's tight and I'm afraid if I twist it too hard something on the other side of the slump block wall will let go or break. The hose bib has a flange where the pipe screws on and it's almost against the block. So what should I do?
Al
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Big Al wrote:

Heat with torch to expand the metal (bibb must be empty of water).
Then wrench off ... gently.
Jim
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What, by the way, *is* a hose bib?
Thanks!
David
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wrote:

http://tinyurl.com/36l7sy
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
http://www.homedepotmoving.com/proj_article_page.do?action=GetProjArtcilePag e&projId$
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David Combs wrote:

I'm interperting your description as saying that the supply pipe screws IN to the back of that flange, and you can verify that by peering behind that flange and seeing some exposed threads.
I'd try this...
Shut off the water supply to it.
Remove the cap, handle and stem.
Heat it with a propane or Mapp gas torch while applying torque with a pipe wrench placed over the body of the hose bib. The heat should help break it free.
There's a chance that the threads I presumed you saw are not on a "pipe" but are on a thread adaptor sweated to the end of a piece of copper pipe. The heating may melt the solder and might just make that adaptor come off along with the hose bib.
If that happens, don't sweat it, or rather DO sweat solder a new adaptor onto the exposed end of the pipe and screw the new hose bib onto it.

Why are you asking that? You must know, you called it by its correct name.

HTH,
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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ypur much better off replacing the guts, so whats wrong with the valve assembly, leak around the handle? tighten packing nut 1/2 turn
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I took the first sentence of his post literally, without thinking about the fact that he might not be in the know enough to realize it likely could be "fixable" with just a simple washer and/or stem packing replacement.
On reflection, you're probably more right than I was. We broke a high temperature record today here in Boston, so the heat must have baked my brain. <G>
Peace,
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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On Fri, 25 May 2007 20:06:17 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

It's what a baby hose wears around its neck when its a sloppy eater.

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95% of all the hose bibs we replace are soldered on. They look like they thread on because of the hex sides that will accommodate a wrench.
cm

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possible damage in the wall is to cut it off in pieces. You may be ahead to chisel away the block around the pipe to see if it is a threaded or soldered connection. If soldered, just blow out the water and heat until the solder melts. If there is a threaded iron pipe, heat and penetrating oil may help but cutting it off is the only really safe way. You would have to be very careful not to damage the threads. Since fairly extensive block work would be required if something in the wall broke, it might be worthwhile to just chisel away enough block to get a pipe wrench on the pipe to hold it while you twist the bib off.
In cases like this, experience helps a lot in judging how much force to use. You might want to seek help. I would be very leery about just trying to unscrew it if it does not yield pretty easily.
Lots of luck, Don Young
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Spray the fitting with penetrating oil. Then try. This can be repeated. Channel lock adjustable pliers are your friend.
If you are afraid to break it then be very patient and gentl. If your are capable of fixing it then sometimes it is easier and faster to just cut the fitting out with the sawzall and replace.
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wrote:

For those that asked, it's definitely threaded. If I pull out on the bib and look behind it I can see a tiny bit of the galvanized pipe and the rusty thread. I can get it about 1/4" away from the wall. Not enough to get to the pipe with something to hold it. I may try to grind a notch in the valve and split it. The flange is going to be the hard part to get to and split. May try to drill a row of small holes??
Al
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So whats wrong with the old faucet? Washers can be replaced, seats reground in place, in minutes:) stem leaks easily fixable.
because its threaded on galvanized you will likely start a much larger job, as that old pipe fail;s when disassembled, or sometime later.
how old is the galvanized, and do you have good water flow thru it?
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Hopefully it goes into either a basement or crawl space. If so, try to get acccess to the inside where you can get a pipe wrench on it.
In any case, before getting really physical, plan for the worst case scenario - what are you going to do if it breaks?. Sometimes it is best to just abandon it (if the bib itself cannot be repaired in-situ) and run a new line (BTDT).
Harry K
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wrote:

The pipe is in a slump block wall. It must come up from the slab inside the block. Going to take the advice and try to rebuild it. Did it about two years ago and it's leaking again. Right after I rebuilt it, it was marginal. Hard to stop the drip. The seat is not replaceable, so I tried to cut it in place. My seat tool may not be the best:)
Thanks, Al
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wrote:

Got it off. Used my propane torch, not the normal kind. One with a large bottle and a regulator, hose and torch. Anyway got the valve hot and was able to get behind the flange with a thin channel lock and hold the 1/2" pipe. Used a short pipe wrench on the sill cock and with much effort it came loose. Replaced it and all seems well. It had me worried. I'm sure now that inside the house the pipe is copper. Was worried I'd break it or cause a leak. So far no evidence I did. Keeping my fingers crossed:)
Thanks for the help,
Al
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Big Al wrote:

"Nothing succeeds like success."
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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