stripped set screw

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I wasn't going to go look for the drills and read what it says on them. Later I decided to look for and post the link.

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J wrote:

Seems like the allen wrench and super glue idea would be worth a try. Of course, try to keep the super glue away from the threads (but you already knew that).
Also, you said there is not much room for one of those screw removal tools. But, since it is a set screw which requires an allen wrench. maybe you don't need much room? By that, I mean that the stripped allen wrench hole already created a hole for the screw removal tool to go into -- meaning you may not need a drill to attach to the tool. Maybe just putting the tool in and using pliers etc. to turn it will allow it to grab the sides of the allen screw hole and back the set screw out.
Or, could you try jamming a small flat screw driver in that allen screw hole and try to get that to grab and back out the set screw?
Let us know how it works out.
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in there, letting it dry and then giving it a go. But if there are any better ideas, It might be prudent to try something else first. I've never gotten anything to stick with superglue**, not even my fingers. I'd use 5 minute epoxee. Make sure it's dry first.
**I almost think it's one elaborate scam.
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One of the problems are people who tighten allen screws till they go click click click. At which point they are ruined and will likely never come out:(
I ran into one of those today:( a shaft in a tube held in place with allens neither of which would move....
managed to move the shaft enough to get the roller out, and had a spare roller and shaft with me:)
Saving me a over 2 hour round trip drive .
I service heated roll laminators for a living....
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'J[_6_ Wrote: > ;3082087']

> having to get a new handle (I'd probably need to get two if I want > matching handles, because this type is no longer made - it was > discontinued when I bought it about 10 years ago.

J:
You should be aware that in most cases, faucet companies will use the same cartridges in their faucets for decades, and only the handles will come and go as plumbing fashions change. So, if the company is still in business, there's any excellent chance that any faucets they make now with similar handles will fit your faucet because they're still probably using the same cartridge.
Also, you should download and snoop through IKissler's faucet parts catalogue. Kissler is a company in New York that specializes in parts for obsolete faucets. They simply purchase those parts from the casting and chrome plating companies that made them for the original faucet manufacturer.
I installed Crane two handle tub & shower faucets when I renovated the 21 bathrooms in my building. Crane discontinued their two handle tub & shower faucet in 1994, and the escutcheon plates that went on around the cartridges before the faucet knobs had disappeared from stock within a few years after that. But I can still buy those escutcheon plates, and any other part I need for them from Kissler because Kissler still buys those parts from the Malaysia company that originally made them for Crane. In fact, the escutcheon plates I buy from Kissler now still have the original Crane name on them even though Crane hasn't ordered those parts for about two decades now.
Kissler is a wholesaler with a $250 minimum order, but they supply hardware stores throughout the United States, and their customer service department should be able to tell you who they ship to regularily in your area, and then it would just be a matter of ordering the faucet handles (presuming Kissler has them) and waiting for that store's next order from Kissler to be delivered.
'Kissler | Plumbing Repair Parts' (http://kissler.com /)
Get on Kissler's web site and click on the "Repair Parts" link in the black bar near the top of the site. When the new page loads, click on thier "Handles and Inserts" catalogue to download it. There'll be a lot of obsolete faucet handles in that catalogue, so you'll have to recognize your handle from the pictures and drawings.
--
nestork


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